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Archive for the 'Korean Translation' Category

Learn Korean Dates: Days of the Week in Korean and More

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Do you know how to say Korean dates (months, weeks, days, and years)? In this blog, we’re going to introduce not only days of the week in Korean, but also hours, seconds, and much more important vocabulary for learning Korean dates and times. Before we take a closer look at date and time in Korean, let’s look at the Korean dates format.

Table of Contents

  1. How are Dates Usually Written and Read in Korean?
  2. How to Say the Years in Korean
  3. Korean Dates: Months
  4. How to Say Korean Calendar Dates
  5. Saying the Days of the Week in Korean
  6. How to Say the Hours in Korean
  7. How to Say the Minutes in Korean
  8. How to Say the Seconds in Korean
  9. How to Say Other Time-related Words
  10. Interesting Korean Celebration Days
  11. Let’s Practice
  12. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Korean

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1. How are Dates Usually Written and Read in Korean?

In Korea, the order of the date is written: 1.) Year, 2.) Month, and 3.) Day. We’ll explain this in more detail later, but for now, here’s how you need to write dates in Korean: [”year”]년 (nyeon), [”month”]월 (wol), [”day”]일 (il).

For example, let’s say that today is the 26th of January, 2019. In Korean, it’s written as 2019년 1월 26일 (icheonsipgunyeon irwol isibyugil), or “2019, January 26th.” If this order is the same in your country, then it shouldn’t be too difficult for you. But if the order is different in your country, then it can be confusing sometimes.

This is especially important to keep in mind when you purchase a product that has an expiration date written on the package. Sometimes the first two numbers of the year aren’t included in the expiration date either (e.g. “90″ instead of “1990″), so don’t get confused about the date. For example, when you see an expiration date of 20/09/21, it doesn’t mean “20th of September, 2021″; it’s “September 21th, 2020.”

Now, let’s learn more important information about dates in South Korea.

Street Signs


2. How to Say the Years in Korean

If you’re not familiar with numbers in Korean, it’s a good idea to first become familiar with the simpler numbers. Once you have a good understanding of Korean numbers, dates will become a lot simpler.

As you may already know, there are two ways to count numbers in Korea: Sino Korean and Native Korean. To count the years, you’ll only need Sino Korean numbers.

For example, if you were born in 1985:

  • 1000, read as 천 (cheon), meaning “one-thousand”
  • 900, read as 구백 (gubaek), meaning “nine-hundred”
  • 80, read as 팔십 (palsib), meaning “eighty”
  • 5, read as 오 (o), meaning “five”

All together, it becomes 천구백팔십오 (cheongubaekpalsibo), meaning “one thousand nine hundred eighty five.”

To say “the year,” you need to say 년 (nyeon). So to say, “The year of 1985,” it becomes 천구백팔십오년 (cheongubaekpalsibonyeon).

In Korea, there’s a number of ways to ask which year someone was born in:

  1. 몇년생이에요?
    Myeonnyeonsaengieyo?
    “Which year were you born in?”
  2. 몇년도에 태어났어요?
    Myeonnyeondoe taeeonasseoyo?
    “Which year were you born in?”
  3. 몇살이에요?
    Myeotsarieyo?
    Technically, it means “How old are you?” but you can answer by stating the year, too.

From 2002 to 2019

Korean Romanization Translation
2002년 (이천이년) 2002nyeon (icheoninyeon) “The year 2002″
2003년 (이천삼년) 2003nyeon (icheonsamnyeon) “The year 2003″
2004년 (이천사년) 2004nyeon (icheonsanyeon) “The year 2004″
2005년 (이천오년) 2005nyeon (icheononyeon) “The year 2005″
2006년 (이천십육년) 2006nyeon (icheonsibyungnyeon) “The year 2006″
2007년 (이천칠년) 2007nyeon (icheonchillyeon) “The year 2007″
2008년 (이천팔년) 2008nyeon (icheonpallyeon) “The year 2008″
2009년 (이천구년) 2009nyeon (icheongunyeon) “The year 2009″
2010년 (이천십년) 2010nyeon (icheonsimnyeon) “The year 2010″
2011년 (이천십일년) 2011nyeon (icheonsibillyeon) “The year 2011″
2012년 (이천십이년) 2012nyeon (icheonsibinyeon) “The year 2012″
2013년 (이천십삼년) 2013nyeon (icheonsipsamnyeon) “The year 2013″
2014년 (이천십사년) 2014nyeon (icheonsipsanyeon) “The year 2014″
2015년 (이천십오년) 2015nyeon (icheonsibonyeon) “The year 2015″
2016년 (이천십육년) 2016nyeon (icheonsibyungnyeon) “The year 2016″
2017년 (이천십칠년) 2017nyeon (icheonsipchillyeon) “The year 2017″
2018년 (이천십팔년) 2018nyeon (icheonsip-pallyeon) “The year 2018″
2019년 (이천십구년) 2019nyeon (icheonsipgunyeon) “The year 2019″

Examples:

  • A: 너 몇년생이야?
    A: Neo myeonnyeonsaengiya?
    A: “Which year were you born in?”

    B: 나? 2010년.
    B: Na? icheonsimnyeon.
    B: “Me? In 2010.”

  • A: BTS의 슈가는 몇년도생이었더라?
    A: Bitieseuui syuganeun myeonnyeondosaengieotdeora?
    A: “What year was Suga from BTS born in?”

    B: 1993년!
    B: Cheongubaekgusipsamnyeon!
    B: “In 1993!”

Quiz:

Are you ready for a quiz? Let’s practice your Korean!

Q1. How do you say “The year of 2001″ in Korean?

  1. 이천삼년 (icheonsamnyeon)
  2. 이천오년 (icheononyeon)
  3. 이천일년 (icheonillyeon)
  4. 이천년 (icheonnyeon)

Q2. What does 이천십팔년 mean in English?

  1. “The year of 2019″
  2. “The year of 2018″
  3. “The year of 2010″
  4. “The year of 2009″

Q3. How do you write “the year” in Korean?

  1. 월 (wol)
  2. 일 (il)
  3. 년 (nyeon)
  4. 요일 (yoil)

Answers:

Q1. -> 4
Q2. -> 2
Q3. -> 3


3. Korean Dates: Months

Months

Now we can start learning the days and months in Korean. To say the months is very easy too; just add a number in Korean followed by 월 (wol), which means “month” in the Korean language. For example, to say September: “nine” is 구 (gu) in Korean, followed by 월 (wol), meaning “month.” So it becomes 구월 (guwol), or “September.” Let’s have a look at months in Korean and some examples below:

From January to December

Korean Romanization Translation
1월 (일월) 1wol (irwol) “January”
2월 (이월) 2wol (iwol) “February”
3월 (삼월) 3wol (samwol) “March”
4월 (사월) 4wol (sawol) “April”
5월 (오월) 5wol (owol) “May”
6월 (유월) 6wol (yuwol) “June”
7월 (칠월) 7wol (chirwol) “July”
8월 (팔월) 8wol (parwol) “August”
9월 (구월) 9wol (guwol) “September”
10월 (시월) 10wol (siwol) “October”
11월 (십일월) 11wol (sibirwol) “November”
12월 (십이월) 12wol (sibiwol) “December”

We also have a free online vocabulary list called 한국어로 월에 대해서 말하기 (hangugeoro wore daehaeseo malhagi) or “Talking about Months”, so check it out on our website.

Examples:

  • A: 너 몇월에 태어났어?
    A: Neo myeochwore taeeonasseo?
    A: “Which month were you born?”

    B: 나? 나 10월에 태어났어.
    B: Na? Na 10wore taeeonasseo.
    B: “Me? I was born in October.”

  • A: 부처님 오신날이 언제 였더라?
    A: Bucheonim osinnari eonje yeotdeora?
    A: “Which month was Buddha’s birthday?”

    B: 5월 8일!
    B: Owol paril!
    B: “It’s the 8th of May!”

Quiz:

Are you ready for a quiz? Let’s practice your Korean!

Q1. How do you say “September” in Korean?

  1. 시월 (siwol)
  2. 칠월 (chilwol)
  3. 일월 (ilwol)
  4. 구월 (guwol)

Q2. Which month has Christmas Day?

  1. 십이월 (sipiwol)
  2. 십일월 (sipilwol)
  3. 팔월 (palwol)
  4. 이월 (iwol)

Q3. Which month has Children’s Day in Korea?

  1. 사월 (sawol)
  2. 오월 (owol)
  3. 삼월 (samwol)
  4. 이월 (iwol)

Answers:

Q1 -> 4
Q2 -> 1
Q3 -> 2

A Red Monthly Calendar


3. How to Say Korean Calendar Dates

일 (il) means “one” in Korean, but it also means “day.” To say the days in Korean, use Sino Korean number followed by 일 (il). For example, to answer someone who asks what day Valentine’s Day is on, you can say: 발렌타인데이는 14일이에요 (ballentaindeineun sipsairieyo), meaning “Valentine’s Day is on the 14th.”

Something to remember: “1st” and “2nd” sound very similar in Korean. For this reason, Koreans often ask whether they understood you correctly or not. So if this happens, don’t be discouraged. Your pronunciation is perfect, it’s just how we do things. (We also use the number gestures for better clarity.)

From 1st to 31st

Korean Romanization Translation
1일 (일일) 1il (iril) “1st”
2일 (이일) 2il (iil) “2nd”
3일 (삼일) 3il (samil) “3rd”
4일 (사일) 4il (sail) “4th”
5일 (오일) 5il (o-il) “5th”
6일 (육일) 6il (yugil) “6th
7일 (칠일) 7il (chiril) “7th”
8일 (팔일) 8il (paril) “8th”
9일 (구일) 9il (guil) “9th”
10일 (십일) 10il (sibil) “10th”
11일 (십일일) 11il (sibiril) “11th”
12일 (십이일) 12il (sibiil) “12th”
13일 (십삼일) 13il (sipsamil) “13th”
14일 (십사일) 14il (sipsail) “14th”
15일 (십오일) 15il (siboil) “15th”
16일 (십육일) 16il (sibyugil) “16th”
17일 (십칠일) 17il (sipchiril) “17th”
18일 (십팔일) 18il (sip-paril) “18th”
19일 (십구일) 19il (sipguil) “19th”
20일 (이십일) 20il (isibil) “20th”
21일 (이십일일) 21il (isibiril) “21st”
22일 (이십이일) 22il (isibiil) “22nd”
23일 (이십삼일) 23il (isipsamil) “23rd”
24일 (이십사일) 24il (isipsail) “24th”
25일 (이십오일) 25il (isiboil) “25th”
26일 (이십육일) 26il (isibyugil) “26th”
27일 (이십칠일) 27il (isipchiril) “27th”
28일 (이십팔일) 28il (isip-paril) “28th”
29일 (이십구일) 29il (isipguil) “29th”
30일 (삼십일) 30il (samsibil) “30th”
31일 (삼십일일) 31il (samsibiril) “31st”

Examples:

  • A: 생일이 언제예요?
    A: Saengiri eonjeyeyo?
    A: “When is your birthday?”

    B: 9월 25일이에요.
    B: Guworisiboirieyo.
    B: “It’s the 25th of September.”

  • A: 너 여동생 생일이 언제야?
    A: Neo yeodongsaeng saengiri eonjeya?
    A: “When is your sister’s birthday?”

    B: 2월20일. 근데 너 왜 내 여동생 생일을 알고 싶은데?
    B: Iworisibil. geunde neo wae nae yeodongsaeng saengireul algo sipeunde?
    B: “It’s the 20th of February. Why do you want to know my sister’s birthday?”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you say 이월 십삼일 in Korean?

  1. 2월 13일
  2. 2월 14일
  3. 1월13일
  4. 1월14일

Q2. When is Christmas Day?

  1. 십일월 이십오일
  2. 십이월 이십오일
  3. 십이월 이일
  4. 사월 이십오일

Q3. How do you say 시월 이십일일 in English?

  1. “21st of November”
  2. “21st of April”
  3. “21st of May”
  4. “21st of October”

Answers:

Q1 -> 1
Q2 -> 2
Q3 -> 4


4. Saying the Days of the Week in Korean

Weekdays

요일 (yoil) means “day” in the Korean language. Let’s check out days in the Korean language as shown below!

From Monday to Sunday

Korean Romanization Translation
월요일 wollyoil “Monday”
화요일 hwayoil “Tuesday”
수요일 suyoil “Wednesday”
목요일 mongnyoil “Thursday”
금요일 geumyoil “Friday”
토요일 toyoil “Saturday”
일요일 illyoil “Sunday”

We also have a free online vocabulary list called 요일에 대해 말하기 (yoire daehae malhagi) or “Talking about Days”. Feel free to check it out on KoreanClass101.

Examples:

  • A: 오늘 무슨요일이지?
    A: Oneul museunyoiriji?
    A: “What day is it today?”

    B: 오늘? 화요일이야.
    B: Oneul? hwayoiriya.
    B: “Today? It’s Tuesday.”

  • A: 내일은 금요일이지?
    A: Naeireun geumyoiriji?
    A: “Tomorrow is Friday right?”

    B: 아니, 내일 토요일이야.
    B: Ani, naeil toyoiriya.
    B: “No, it’s Saturday tomorrow.”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you write “day” in Korean?

  1. 요일 (yoil)
  2. 시 (si)
  3. 년 (nyeon)
  4. 월 (wol)

Q2. How do you write “Sunday” in Korean?

  1. 월요일 (wollyoil)
  2. 화요일 (hwayoil)
  3. 금요일 (geumyoil)
  4. 일요일 (illyoil)

Q3. How do you write “Monday” in Korean?

  1. 일요일 (illyoil)
  2. 수요일 (suyoil)
  3. 월요일 (wollyoil)
  4. 목요일 (mongnyoil)

Answers:

Q1 -> 1
Q2 -> 4
Q3 -> 3

A Vintage Clock and a Calendar


5. How to Say the Hours in Korean

In this section, we’ll focus on “hours” (and not “the time” as in “What time is it?”). If you want to learn how to read the clock in Korean, check out our article titled 시간에 대해 말하기 (sigane daehae malhagi) or “Talking about Time.”

“Hours” in Korean is 시간 (sigan). Let’s have a look at the table below for more vocabulary.

Korean Romanization Translation
1시간 (한시간) 1sigan (hansigan) “One hour”
2시간 (두시간) 2sigan (dusigan) “Two hours”
3시간 (세시간) 3sigan (sesigan) “Three hours”
4시간 (네시간) 4sigan (nesigan) “Four hours”
5시간 (다섯시간) 5sigan (daseotsigan) “Five hours”
6시간 (여섯시간) 6sigan (yeoseotsigan) “Six hours”
7시간 (일곱시간) 7sigan (ilgopsigan) “Seven hours”
8시간 (여덟시간) 8sigan (yeodeolsigan) “Eight hours”
9시간 (아홉시간) 9sigan (ahopsigan) “Nine hours”
10시간 (열시간) 10sigan (yeolsigan) “Ten hours”
11시간 (열한시간) 11sigan (yeolhansigan) “Eleven hours”
12시간 (열두시간) 12sigan (yeoldusigan) “Twelve hours”

Examples:

  • A: 비행기가 2시간이나 지연됐어.
    A: Bihaenggiga dusiganina jiyeondwaesseo.
    A: “The plane got delayed for two hours.”

    B: 아 정말? 그럼 2시간 뒤에 픽업하러 갈께.
    B: A jeongmal? Geureom dusigan dwie pigeopareo galkke.
    B: “Oh really? I will come and pick you up after two hours then.”

  • A: 하루 한시간은 꼭 요가를 하려고 해.
    A: Haru hansiganeun kkok yogareul haryeogo hae.
    A: “I am trying to do yoga at least one hour per day.”

    B: 그건 좋은 생각인것 같아. 나는 일주일에 3시간은 꼭 조깅을 하고 있어.
    B: Geugeon joeun saenggagingeot gata. Naneun iljuire sesiganeun kkok jogingeul hago isseo.
    B: “That’s a great idea. I do jogging for three hours per week.”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you write “hour(s)” in Korean?

  1. 시간 (sigan)
  2. 월 (wol)
  3. 일 (il)
  4. 년 (nyeon)

Q2. How do you say “twelve hours” in Korean?

  1. 열시간 (yeolsigan)
  2. 여덟시간 (yeodeolsigan)
  3. 네시간 (nesigan)
  4. 열두시간 (yeoldusigan)

Q3. How do you write “twenty-four hours” in Korean?

  1. 한시간 (hansigan)
  2. 이십사시간 (isipsasigan)
  3. 일곱시간 (ilgopsigan)
  4. 다섯시간 (daseotsigan)

Answers:

Q1 -> 1
Q2 -> 4
Q3 -> 2


6. How to Say the Minutes in Korean

“Minute(s)” is 분 (bun) in Korean. When you want to write “how many minutes” in Korean, it’s 몇분 (myeotbun).

Let’s have a look at a number of examples:

Korean Romanization Translation
5분 (오분) 5bun (obun) “Five minutes”
10분 (십분) 10bun (sipbun) “Ten minutes”
20분 (이십분) 20bun (isipbun) “Twenty minutes”
35분 (삼십오분) 35bun (samsibobun) “Thirty-five minutes”
42분 (사십이분) 42bun (sasibibun) “Forty-two minutes”
51분 (오십일분) 51bun (osibilbun) “Fifty-one minutes”
59분 (오십구분) 59bun (osipgubun) “Fifty-nine minutes”

Examples:

  • A: 몇시에 도착할 것 같아?
    A: Myeotsie dochakal geot gata?
    A: “When do you think you will arrive?”

    B: 10분안에 도착할께.
    B: Sipbunane dochakalkke.
    B: “I will be there in ten minutes.”

  • A: 휴, 캐런은 약속 시간에 맨날 10분 이상 늦더라.
    A: Hyu, kaereoneun yaksok sigane maennal 10bun isang neutdeora.
    A: “Phew, Karen is always late for at least ten minutes.”

    B: 야, 내 친구는 한시간이나 늦을때도 있어.
    B: Ya, nae chinguneun hansiganina neujeulttaedo isseo.
    B: “Hey, my friend sometimes is late for one hour.”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you say “ten minutes” in Korean?

  1. 삼십오분 (samsibobun)
  2. 십분 (sipbun)
  3. 사십이분 (sasibibun)
  4. 오십구분 (osipgubun)

Q2. How do you say “fifty-nine minutes” in Korean?

  1. 오분 (obun)
  2. 십분 (sipbun)
  3. 오십구분 (osipgubun)
  4. 사십이분 (sasibibun)

Q3. How do you say “minute(s)” in Korean?

  1. 년 (nyeon)
  2. 일 (il)
  3. 시간 (sigan)
  4. 분 (bun)

Answers:

Q1. -> 2
Q2. -> 3
Q3. -> 4


7. How to Say the Seconds in Korean

Numbers

“Second” is 초 (cho) in Korean. Let’s have a look at the table below to practice how to say different “second(s)” in Korean.

Korean Romanization Translation
1초 (일초) ilcho “One second”
5초 (오초) ocho “Five seconds”
13초 (십삼초) sipsamcho “Thirteen seconds”
26초 (이십육초) isibyukcho “Twenty-six seconds”
30초 (삼십초) samsipcho “Thirty seconds”
37초 (삼십칠초) samsipchilcho “Thirty-seven seconds”
44초 (사십사초) sasipsacho “Forty-four seconds”
52초 (오십이초) osibicho “Fifty-two seconds”
59초 (오십구초) osipgucho “Fifty-nine seconds”

Examples:

  • A: 1분은 총 몇 초게?
    A: Ilbuneun chong myeot choge?
    A: “How many seconds in one minute?”

    B: 60초!
    B: Yuksipcho!
    B: “Sixty seconds!”

  • A: 10 초안에 이 문제 풀 수 있겠어?
    A: Sip choane i munje pul su itgesseo?
    A: “Can you solve this problem in ten seconds?”

    B:뭐라고? 말도 안돼!
    B: Mworago? Maldo andwae!
    B: “What? That’s nonsense!”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you write “second(s)” in Korean?

  1. 분 (bun)
  2. 년 (nyeon)
  3. 초 (cho)
  4. 일 (il)

Q2. How do you write “one minute” in Korean?

  1. 일초 (ilcho)
  2. 이초 (icho)
  3. 삼초 (samcho)
  4. 사초 (sacho)

Q3. How do you say “sixty seconds” in Korean?

  1. 오십육초 (osibyukcho)
  2. 십오초 (sibocho)
  3. 이십이초 (isibicho)
  4. 육십초 (yuksipcho)

Answers:

Q1. -> 3
Q2. -> 1
Q3. -> 4


8. How to Say Other Time-related Words

Korean Romanization Translation
평일 pyeongil “Weekdays”
주말 jumal “Weekend(s)”
골든위크 goldeunwikeu “Golden Week”
샌드위치 데이* saendeuwichi dei “Sandwich Day”
어제 eoje “Yesterday”
오늘 oneul “Today”
내일 naeil “Tomorrow”
엊그저께 eotgeujeokke “A few days ago”
그저께 geujeokke “The day before yesterday”
내일모레 naeilmore “The day after tomorrow”

Examples:

  • A: BTS 콘서트 언제였지? 갑자기 기억이 안나네.
    A: Bitieseu konseoteu eonjeyeotji? Gapjagi gieogi annane.
    A: “When was the BTS concert? I can’t remember suddenly.”

    B: 잠깐만… 8월8일이니깐… 어머, 내일모레네!
    B: Jamkkanman… parwolparirinikkan… eomeo, naeilmorene!
    B: “Hold on… It’s on the 8th of August…oh my goodness, it’s in two days!”

  • A: 나 엊그저께 친구 결혼식 갔다 왔는데, 둘이 너무 행복해 보였어.
    A: Na eotgeujeokke chingu gyeolhonsik gatda wanneunde, duri neomu haengbokae boyeosseo.
    A: “I went to my friend’s wedding a few days ago and they both looked really happy.”

    B: 난 주말에 결혼식 가야 해.
    B: Nan jumare gyeolhonsik gaya hae.
    B: “I have to go to a wedding this weekend.”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you say “yesterday” in Korean?

  1. 골든위크 (goldeunwikeu)
  2. 어제 (eoje)
  3. 샌드위치 데이 (saendeuwichi dei)
  4. 엊그저께 (eotgeujeokke)

Q2. How do you say “the day before yesterday” in Korean?

  1. 내일모레 (naeilmore)
  2. 어제 (eoje)
  3. 그저께 (geujeokke)
  4. 오늘 (oneul)

Q3. How do you say “today” in Korean?

  1. 오늘 (oneul)
  2. 엊그저께 (eotgeujeokke)
  3. 어제 (eoje)
  4. 그저께 (geujeokke)

Answers:

Q1. -> 2
Q2. -> 3
Q3. -> 1

A Small Whipped Cupcake with a Candle


9. Interesting Korean Celebration Days

Did you know that every month there’s at least one event happening? Korea has many interesting days of celebration and they’re fun to participate in, especially if you’re in a relationship or dating someone. Let’s have a look at some of the most popular celebration days in South Korea:

Korean Romanization Translation Meaning
다이어리 데이 (1월 14일)           daieori dei “Diary Day”

It’s the day that couples give each other their diaries.
발렌타인 데이 (2월 14일)           ballentain dei “Valentine’s Day” It’s the day that couples give each other chocolate.
삼겹살 데이 (3월3일)           samgyeopsal dei “Samgyeopsal Day” It’s the day to eat Samgyupsal with someone you like.
화이트 데이 (3월 14일)           hwaiteu dei “White Day” It’s the day that couples give each other candy.
블랙 데이 (4월 14일)           beullaek dei “Black Day” It’s the day to eat Jjajang noodles if you haven’t received any chocolates or candies from anyone.
로즈 데이 (5월 14일)           rojeu dei “Rose Day” It’s the day to give a rose to your gf/bf.
키스 데이 (6월 14일)           kiseu dei “Kiss Day” It’s the day to give a kiss to your gf/bf.
실버 데이 (7월 14일)           silbeo dei “Silver Day” It’s the day to exchange a silver ring with your gf/bf.
그린 데이 (8월 14일)           geurin dei “Green Day” It’s the day to walk through the woods with your gf/bf.
치킨 데이 (9월 9일)           chikin dei “Chicken Day” It’s the day to eat some fried chicken with someone you like.
포토 데이 (9월 14일)           poto dei “Photo Day” It’s the day to take pictures with your gf/bf.
와인 데이 (10월 14일)           wain dei “Wine Day” It’s the day to drink some wine with your gf/bf.
무비 데이 (11월 14일)           mubi dei “Movie Day” It’s the day to watch a film with your gf/bf.
허그 데이 (12월 14일)           heogeu dei “Hug Day” It’s the day to give a hug to your gf/bf.


10. Let’s Practice

Knowing how to discuss various time frames is important when making a reservation. Let’s imagine that you’re trying to make a reservation at a fancy restaurant to celebrate your engagement with your fiance.

Situation:

  • Concierge: 한국호텔입니다. 무엇을 도와드릴까요?
    Concierge: Hangukoterimnida. Mueoseul dowadeurilkkayo?
    Concierge: “This is a Korean hotel. How may I help you?”
  • You: 여보세요, 예약하고 싶은데요.
    You: Yeoboseyo, yeyakago sipeundeyo.
    You: “Hello, I would like to make a reservation please.”
  • Concierge: 네, 언제로 해드릴까요?
    Concierge: Ne, eonjero haedeurilkkayo?
    Concierge: “Sure, when would you like to come?”
  • You: 12월 25일 오후 7시 가능한가요?
    You: Sibiwol isiboiril ohu ilgopsi ganeunghangayo?
    You: Is it possible on the 25th of December at seven o’clock in the evening?”
  • Concierge: 확인해보겠습니다. 죄송하지만 12월 25일은 예약이 꽉 차 있습니다. 다른 날은 어떠신가요.
    Concierge: Hwaginhaebogetseumnida. Joesonghajiman 12wol 25ireun yeyagi kkwak cha itseumnida. Dareun nareun eotteosingayo.
    Concierge: “Let me check it now. I am sorry but it’s full. How about other dates?”
  • You: 아 그래요? 그럼 12월 26일 오후 7시는 가능한가요?
    You: A geuraeyo? Geureom sibiworwol isibyugil ohu ilgopsineun ganeunghangayo?
    You: “Oh really? How about on the 26th of December at seven in the evening?”
  • Concierge: 네 가능합니다. 예약 잡아 드릴까요?
    Concierge: Ne ganeunghamnida. Yeyak jaba deurilkkayo?
    Concierge: “Yes you can. Do you want me to save the room for you?”
  • You: 네, 잡아주세요.
    You: Ne, jabajuseyo.
    You: “Yes please.”
  • Concierge: 성함과 전화번호 알려주시겠습니까?
    Concierge: Seonghamgwa jeonhwabeonho allyeojusigetseumnikka?
    Concierge: “May I have your name and your number please?”

Korean Landmark


11. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Korean

We hope you found this blog very informative, and that we helped you learn Korean dates and time! KoreanClass101 has many free online classes and even on online forum to discuss lessons with fellow students. You’ll also find an array of blog posts like this one, and can even learn Korean with your own personal Korean teacher by upgrading your account to Premium Plus. So do check out our website, and have a great day!

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Essential Korean Language for Travel that You Must Know

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Are you planning to travel to Korea? Korean travel phrases in language-learning are absolutely essential for just this reason!

Learning basic South Korean travel phrases will definitely help you in nearly any situation, including urgent ones. The Korean travel phrases and Korean travel words you’ll learn in this article will make your travels more fun and help you connect with locals, so that you can get the most out of your upcoming trip to South Korea!

Table of Contents

  1. Essential Korean Travel Phrases: Basic Expressions
  2. Essential Korean Phrases: Transportation
  3. Essential Korean Phrases: Shopping
  4. Essential Korean Phrases: At Restaurants
  5. Essential Korean Phrases: Asking for and Giving Directions
  6. Essential Korean Phrases: Emergencies
  7. Essential Korean Phrases: Flattery Phrases
  8. Essential Korean Phrases: Useful Phrases to Go Through Language Problems
  9. Essential Korean Phrases: Buying Tickets at a Museum
  10. Essential Korean Phrases: Taking Pictures
  11. How KoreanClass101.com Can Help You with Korean

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1. Essential Korean Travel Phrases: Basic Expressions

Preparing For Travel

You’ll be able to converse with local native Koreans by simply remembering these basic phrases. Koreans will appreciate the fact that you made the effort to speak to them in their local language, and it will certainly add more fun to your South Korea trip.

1- 안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo) - “hello” (polite form)

This is one of the most basic and commonly used Korean phrases for travelling, so be sure to keep it in your arsenal!

Example 1:
You enter a restaurant and a waitress greets you.

  • Waitress: 안녕하세요.
    Waitress: Annyeonghaseyo.
    Waitress: “Hello.”
  • You: 안녕하세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo.
    You: “Hello.”

Example 2:
You take a taxi and want to greet the taxi driver.

  • You: 안녕하세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo.
    You: “Hello.”
  • Taxi driver: 네, 안녕하세요. 어디로 가시나요?
    Taxi driver: Ne, annyeonghaseyo. Eodiro gasinayo?
    Taxi driver: “Yes, hello. Where would you like to go?”

2 - 반갑습니다 (bangapseumnida) - “nice to meet you” (polite form)

Example 1:
Jason went to your friend’s house and met their roommate, who is older than him, for the first time.

  • Roommate: 어? 친구 데려왔어? 누구야?
    Roommate: Eo? Chingu deryeowasseo? Nuguya?
    Roommate: “Oh, you brought your friend home? Who is he?”
  • Jason: 안녕하세요, 반갑습니다.
    Jason: Annyeonghaseyo, bangapseumnida.
    Jason: “Hello, nice to meet you.”

Example 2:
Michael went to a language exchange event in Hongdae and wants to introduce himself to others.

  • Michael: 안녕하세요, 저는 마이클이라고 합니다. 반갑습니다.
    Michael: Annyeonghaseyo, jeoneun maikeurirago hamnida. Bangapseumnida.
    Michael: “Hello, my name is Michael. Nice to meet you.”

3 - 감사합니다 (gamsahamnida) - “thank you” (polite form)

Example 1:
You’re walking in the busy streets in the Gangnam area, and see a lady drop her wallet. You pick it up and give it to her.

  • You: 여기, 지갑 떨어뜨리셨어요.
    You: Yeogi, jigap tteoreotteurisyeosseoyo.
    You: “Here, you dropped your wallet.”
  • Lady: 어머, 감사합니다.
    Lady: Eomeo, gamsahamnida.
    Lady: “Oh, thank you so much.”

Example 2:
You order a cup of coffee at The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf and a clerk gives you the change after you’ve paid.

  • Clerk: 500원 거스름돈 드리겠습니다.
    Clerk: Obaegwon geoseureumdon deurigetseumnida.
    Clerk: “Here is [your] change, 500 won.”
  • You: 감사합니다.
    You: Gamsahamnida.
    You: “Thank you.”

4 - 실례합니다 (sillyehamnida) - “excuse me” (polite form)

This is one of the most useful Korean travel phrases you can learn, so keep it in mind.

Example 1:
You’re on a crowded subway and need to get closer to the exit.

  • You: 실례합니다. 지나가겠습니다.
    You: Sillyehamnida. Jinagagetseumnida.
    You: “Excuse me. Passing through.”

Example 2:
You accidentally stepped on a stranger’s foot inside the busy subway.

  • You: 실례합니다.
    You: Sillyehamnida.
    You: “Excuse me.”

5- 네; 아니요; 괜찮아요. (ne; aniyo; gwaenchanayo.) - “yes; no; no, thank you.”

While you learn Korean travel phrases, never underestimate the importance of even the smallest words. They can have the most impact!

Example 1:

  • You: 이쪽으로 가면 화장실인가요?
    You: Ijjogeuro gamyeon hwajangsiringayo?
    You: “Is this way to the toilet?”
  • Clerk: 아니요, 그쪽은 창고예요.
    Clerk: Aniyo, geujjogeun changgoyeyo.
    Clerk: “No, that’s the storage section.”
  • You: 아, 그럼 저쪽으로 가면 되나요?
    You: A, geureom jeojjogeuro gamyeon doenayo?
    You: “Ah, so should I go that way?”
  • Clerk: 네, 맞아요.
    Clerk: Ne, majayo.
    Clerk: “Yes, correct.”

Example 2:
You had a great time hanging out with your friend. But it’s getting late—time to go home.

  • Friend: 많이 어두워졌네, 집에 데려다 줄까?
    Friend: Mani eoduwojyeonne, jibe deryeoda julkka?
    Friend: “It became really dark. Did you want me to take you to your home?”
  • You: 아니, 괜찮아. 혼자갈 수 있어.
    You: Ani, gwaenchana. Honjagal su isseo.
    You: “No, I’m fine. I can go home by myself.”

We have more free lessons like “Top 10 Conversational Phrases,” so do check out this page when you have time.


2. Essential Korean Phrases: Transportation

Airplane Phrases

Traveling by public transportation is the most efficient way to get around South Korea. The fares for the subway and public buses are very cheap, and the routes are easy to understand. There are also announcements offered in various languages, so the chance of getting lost is slim.

However, you need to remember that most of the staff at the ticket booths don’t speak English. Let’s learn the most important and useful phrases for buying tickets and conversing with any staff that you encounter.

1- ~으로 가는 티켓 주세요. (~euro ganeun tiket juseyo.)

~으로 가는 티켓 주세요. (~euro ganeun tiket juseyo.) means “Please give me a ticket to ~.” Use this phrase to buy any tickets to go out of the city area.

Example 1:
You’re at Dong-Daegu train station (동대구역; dongdaeguyeok) to buy a train ticket to Busan.

  • You: 부산으로 가는 티켓 주세요.
    You: Busaneuro ganeun tiket juseyo
    You: “I would like to buy a ticket to go to Busan.”
  • Staff: 출발시간은 언제가 괜찮으십니까?
    Staff: Chulbalsiganeun eonjega gwaenchaneusimnikka?
    Staff: “When would you like to depart?”
  • You: 오후 1시쯤 출발하는 기차 있을까요?
    You: Ohu 1sijjeum chulbalhaneun gicha isseulkkayo?
    You: “Are there any trains that depart at 13:00 (one o’clock PM)?”

Example 2:
You’re at the Seoul Express Bus Terminal to buy a bus ticket to Pohang (포항; pohang).

  • You: 안녕하세요, 오후 1시 포항으로 가는 티켓 주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, ohu 1si pohangeuro ganeun tiket juseyo.
    You: “Hello, I would like to buy a ticket to go to Pohang at 13:00 (one o’clock PM).”
  • Staff: 네, 몇장 드리면 될까요?
    Staff: Ne, myeotjang deurimyeon doelkkayo?
    Staff: “Okay, how many tickets do you need?”
  • You: 한장이요.
    You: Hanjangiyo.
    You: “Just one.”

2- ~으로 가는 전철/버스 인가요? (~euro ganeun jeoncheol/beoseu ingayo?)

This phrase means “Does this subway/bus go to ~?”

It’s likely that you’ll take a bus or subway to get around in South Korea. This travel phrase will come in handy when you want to ask a question to locals. When you travel by boat or ferry, simply replace the noun with “boat” (배; bae).

Example 1:
You’re at the Incheon airport and need to go to the Jamsil area. A bus stops in front of you, and you want to ask whether this bus goes to Jamsil.

  • You: 잠실로 가는 버스인가요?
    You: Jamsillo ganeun beoseuingayo?
    You: “Does this bus go to Jamsil?”
  • Staff: 네, 갑니다.
    Staff: Ne, gamnida.
    Staff: “Yes, it does.”

Example 2:
You’re at Gukje market in Busan and you need to catch the subway to go to Gimhae International airport.

  • You: 실례합니다. 이 전철은 부산 공항으로 가는 전철인가요?
    You: Sillyehamnida. i jeoncheoreun busan gonghangeuro ganeun jeoncheoringayo?
    You: “Excuse me. Does this subway go to the Busan airport?”
  • Stranger: 아니요, 부산 공항으로 가는 전철은 저쪽이예요.
    Stranger: Aniyo, busan gonghangeuro ganeun jeoncheoreun jeojjogiyeyo.
    Stranger: “No, the subway bound for the Busan airport is over there.”
  • You: 감사합니다.
    You: Gamsahamnida.
    You: “Thank you.”

3- ~으로 가주세요. (~euro gajuseyo.)

This phrase means “Please take me to ~.”

This travel phrase is the most effective and simple phrase to tell your taxi driver. Simply add the destination that you want to reach, such as “Insadong” (인사동; insadong) or “Dongdaemun” (동대문; dongdaemun) etc., followed by 으로 가주세요. (~euro gajuseyo.). That’s it. You don’t need to say anything else!

However, if you want to go somewhere less touristy, and it requires you to explain where exactly you want to go, give the taxi driver the address. Every taxi has a navigation system installed. Also, taxi companies provide free interpreter services in South Korea.

To know whether the taxi you got in offers this service, take a look on the right-hand side of the door. Usually, there’s a large rectangular sign that explains about this service in English, Japanese, and Chinese. So if you’re struggling to explain where you want to go, simply say “free interpreter” to the taxi driver.

Example 1:
You’re at “Gangnam station” (강남역; gangnamyeok) right now and want to move to “Itaewon” (이태원; itaewon) to have dinner with your friends.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 이태원역으로 가주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, itaewonyeogeuro gajuseyo.
    You: “Hello, please take me to Itaewon station.”
  • Taxi driver: 네, 알겠습니다.
    Taxi driver: Ne, algetseumnida.
    Taxi driver: “Sure.”

Example 2:
You want to visit your friend’s house in Busan, and you have his address.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 이곳으로 가고 싶은데요.. (주소를 보여줌)
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, igoseuro gago sipeundeyo.. (jusoreul boyeojum)
    You: “Hello, I would like to go to this place…” (show him the address)
  • Taxi driver: 잠시만요. (네비게이션으로 주소 확인함)
    Taxi driver: Jamsimanyo. (nebigeisyeoneuro juso hwaginham)
    Taxi driver: “Please hold on…” (checks the location via navigation system)


3. Essential Korean Phrases: Shopping

Basic Questions

1 - 이거/저것 얼마예요? (igeo/jeogeot eolmayeyo?)

This phrase means “How much is this/that?”

Use this travel phrase when you want to ask the seller how much the items cost while shopping in South Korea. To get the seller’s attention, you can say 저기요 (jeogiyo) which means “excuse me.” If the seller is male, you can call him by 아저씨 (ajeossi) meaning “mature man,” and if the seller is female, you can call her by 아줌마 (ajumma) meaning “matured female” or 이모 (imo) meaning “aunt.”

Also, remember that 이것 (igeot) means “this” and 저것 (jeogeot) means “that.” If you want each of them to be plural, say 이것들 (igeotdeul) meaning “these” and 저것들 (jeogeotdeul) meaning “those.”

Example 1:
You’re shopping at a famous market called “Gwangjang market” (광장시장; Gwangjangsijang), in Seoul. You found a set of Korean traditional clothing called “Hanbok” (한복; hanbok) which you want to buy, and you’re curious to know how much it costs.

  • You: 아저씨, 이거 얼마에요?
    You: Ajeossi, igeo eolmaeyo?
    You: “Excuse me sir, how much is this?”
  • Seller: 7만원이에요.
    Seller: Chilmanwonieyo.
    Seller: “It’s 70,000 won.”

Example 2:
You found a pink sweater that you like while shopping at 서문시장 (seomun sijang) in Daegu. You want to ask how much the sweater costs.

  • You: 저기요, 저건 얼마예요?
    You: jeogiyo, jeogeon eolmayeyo?
    You: “Excuse me, how much is that?”
  • Seller: 2만9천원이예요.
    Seller: Imangucheonwoniyeyo.
    Seller: “It’s 29,000 won.”
  • You: (저거) 한개 주세요.
    You: (jeogeo) Hangae juseyo.
    You: “Please give me one (of that).”

2 - 이거 #개 주세요. (igeo #gae juseyo.)

This phrase means “Please give me [number] [of the product].”

Example 1:
You’re at the supermarket and the clerk wants to ask how many plastic bags you want.

  • Seller: 비닐봉지 몇개 드릴까요?
    Seller: Binilbongji myeotgae deurilkkayo?
    Seller: “How many plastic bags would you like to have?”
  • You: 2개 주세요.
    You: Dugae juseyo.
    You: “Two please.”

Example 2:
You found a beautiful “Korean traditional pocket” called 전통 주머니 (jeontong jumeoni) and want to buy six of them.

  • You: 이거 6개 주세요.
    You: Igeo yeoseotgae juseyo.
    You: “Please give me six (of the Korean traditional pockets).”
  • Seller: 네.
    Seller: Ne.
    Seller: “Ok.”

On our website, KoreanClass101, you can find many lessons on counting numbers in Korean. Feel free to check out our website whenever you want.

3- 조금만 깎아 주시면 안될까요? (Jogeumman kkakka jusimyeon andoelkkayo?)

This phrase means “Can you please reduce the price?”

The prices in Korea are usually fixed, but you can definitely negotiate the price at a market. To ask for a discount, use this phrase!

If you want to buy items for a cheaper price in Korea, try to pay by cash. If you pay with a credit card, you’ll be charged extra (approximately ten percent more).

Example 1:
You’re at 남대문시장 (Namdaemun sijang) meaning “Namdaemun market” in Seoul and found a nice jacket. You ask for the price and think that it costs too much. You want to negotiate the price.

  • You: 너무 이쁘긴한데… 비싸네요. 조금만 깎아 주시면 안될까요?
    You: Neomu ippeuginhande… bissaneyo. Jogeumman kkakka jusimyeon andoelkkayo?
    You: “It’s really pretty…but it’s expensive. Can you please reduce the price a bit?”
  • Seller: 그럼 3,000원만 깎아 줄게요.
    Seller: Geureom samcheonwonman kkakka julgeyo.
    Seller: “I will give you a discount of 3,000 won then.”

Example 2:
You’re at 고속터미널 역 지하상가 (gosokteomineol yeok jihasangga) an underground shopping mall in the Express Bus Terminal station in Seoul, and want to buy a pair of jeans. The sign says that it costs 10,000 won if you pay by cash. But you only have a credit card.

  • You: 이거 카드로 계산할게요.
    You: Igeo kadeuro gyesanhalgeyo.
    You: “I will pay by credit card.”
  • Seller: 카드로 계산하면 11,000원이에요. 현금으로 내는게 더 저렴해요.
    Seller: kadeuro gyesanhamyeon mancheonwonieyo. hyeongeumeuro naeneun ge deo jeoryeomhaeyo.
    Seller: “If you pay by card, it will be 11,000 won. It will be cheaper by cash.”
  • You: 아 그래요? 이곳에 가장 가까운 ATM기계는 어디에 있나요?
    You: Igose gajang gakkaun ATMgigyeneun eodie innayo?
    You: “Oh really? Where is the nearest ATM from here?”

4- S/M/L 사이즈 있나요? (S/M/L saijeu innayo?)

This phrase means “Do you have S/M/L size for this?”

When you ask for a different size, if a seller says it’s 프리사이즈 (peurisaijeu), this means that it’s “free-size.” Do be careful when you buy free-size clothing, as it may be too big or small when you try it on. Also, for many shops at a market or an underground shopping area, you can’t refund the items after purchase.

Example 1:
You’re at an underground shopping mall in Gangnam station. You find a sweater and there’s no size written on the tag.

  • You: 이건 사이즈가 어떻게 돼요?
    You: Igeon saijeuga eotteoke dwaeyo?
    You: “What size is this?”
  • Seller: 그거 프리사이즈에요.
    Seller: Geugeo peurisaijeueyo.
    Seller: “It’s a free-size sweater.”

Example 2:
You want to ask if the dress you chose comes in different sizes.

  • You: 이 드레스 M 사이즈도 있나요?
    You: I deureseu em saijeudo innayo?
    You: “Do you have an M size?”
  • Seller: 네, 잠시만요.
    Seller: Ne, jamsimanyo.
    Seller: “Yes, hold on a sec.”

5- 뭐가 제일 인기 많아요? (mwoga jeil ingi manayo?)

This phrase means “What are the most popular ones?”

Sometimes it can be overwhelming when you need to choose something out of so many goods. If you’re not sure which one to choose, it’s always safe to ask a seller which item is popular these days.

Example 1:
You bought a number of items at a shop and a seller wants to give you some freebies.

  • You: 너무 이쁜것들이 많아서 못 고르겠어요. 어떤 것이 제일 인기가 많아요?
    You: Neomu ippeungeotdeuri manaseo mot goreugesseoyo. eotteon geosi jeil ingiga manayo?
    You: “There are so many things that I can’t choose. What is the most popular one from here?”
  • Seller: 요즘은 이 아이템이 한국에서 인기가 많아요.
    Seller: Yojeumeun i aitemi hangugeseo ingiga manayo.
    Seller: “These days, this item is quite popular in Korea.”

Example 2:
You want to buy a dress that’s trending in Korea.

  • You: 어느 드레스가 제일 인기 많아요?
    You: Eoneu deureseuga jeil ingi manayo?
    You: “Which dress is the most popular dress in Korea?”
  • Seller: 이거요.
    Seller: Igeoyo.
    Seller: “This one.”

Do you want more phrases for shopping? Check out “15 Shopping Phrases. Exchanges, Refunds and Complaints!” on KoreanClass101.com.

Korean Dishes In Silver Plates


4. Essential Korean Phrases: At Restaurants

1- ~주세요 (~Juseyo)

This phrase means “Please give me ~,” and it can be used not only to order dishes, but also to buy things like tickets or clothing.

Example 1:
You enter a restaurant and want to ask for a menu.

  • You: 저기요, 메뉴주세요.
    You: Jeogiyo, menyujuseyo.
    You: “Excuse me, please give me a menu.”
  • Waitress: 네, 여기있습니다.
    Waitress: Ne, yeogiitseumnida.
    Waitress: “Sure, here you go.”

Example 2:
You want to order a bottle of beer and soju to try to make 소맥 (somaek) which is a whiskey and beer cocktail.

  • You: 저기요, 맥주 한병이랑 소주 한병 주세요.
    You: Jeogiyo, maekju hanbyeongirang soju hanbyeong juseyo.
    You: “Excuse me, can I please have a bottle of beer and soju?”
  • Waitress:네, 여기있습니다.
    Waitress: Ne, yeogiitseumnida.
    Waitress: “Sure, here you go.”

2- 많이 매운가요? (Mani maeungayo?)

This phrase means “Is this spicy?”

Many Korean dishes are spicy for foreigners because we use 고추장 (Gochujang) meaning “red chili paste” or 고춧가루 (gochutgaru) meaning “chili powder” in most dishes. When ordering spicy dishes in Korea, you can request to make it less spicy, so you can still enjoy Korean dishes!

Example 1:
You’re at one of the famous ddeokbokki restaurants named 죠스떡볶이 (jyoseutteokbokki). It’s your first time trying some ddeokbokki.

  • You: 떡볶이 주세요.
    You: Tteokbokki juseyo.
    You: “I will have ddeokbokki please.”
  • Waitress: 매운 거 잘 못 드시면 많이 매우실 텐데요.
    Waitress: Maeun geo jal mot deusimyeon mani maeusil tendeyo.
    Waitress: “If you struggle a lot to eat spicy foods, you may not be able to eat this dish.”
  • You: 아, 많이 매운가요? 그럼 덜 맵게 해주시겠어요?
    You: A, mani maeungayo? geureom deol maepge haejusigesseoyo?
    You: “Ah, is it really that spicy? Is it possible to make it less spicy?”

Example 2:
You want to ask whether the dish you want to order is spicy or not.

  • You: 이거 많이 매운가요?
    You: Igeo mani maeungayo?
    You: “Is this spicy?”
  • Waiter: 아니요, 맵지 않습니다.
    Waiter: Aniyo, maepji anseumnida.
    Waiter: “No, it’s not spicy.”

3- 저는 채식주의자예요. (Jeoneun chaesikjuuijayeyo)

This important phrase means “I am a vegetarian.”

“Vegetarian” is 채식주의자 (chaesikjuuija) and “vegan” is 비건 (bigeon) in Korean. Although the number of vegetarian restaurants is increasing, this concept (especially veganism) is fairly new to South Korea. Therefore, do research in advance if you’re after specific vegetarian/vegan restaurants in Korea.

Otherwise, vegetarian dishes are easy to find, so don’t worry too much. Classic dishes include 야채 김밥 (vegetable gimbap) and 잡채 (japchae).

Example 1:
You’re at a gimbap restaurant and want to order a vegetarian gimbap.

  • You: 저는 채식주의자예요. 어떤 김밥을 먹으면 될까요?
    You: Jeoneun chaesikjuuijayeyo. eotteon gimbabeul meogeumyeon doelkkayo?
    You: “I am vegetarian. Is there any gimbap for me to eat?”
  • Staff: 채식주의자세요? 그럼 야채 김밥 드셔야겠네요.
    Staff: Chaesikjuuijaseyo? geureom yachae gimbap deusyeoyagenneyo.
    Staff: “Are you vegetarian? Then you should order the vegetable gimbap.”

Example 2:
You went to a restaurant with your friend, who doesn’t know that you’re vegetarian. He wants to order 삼겹살 (samgyeopsal) or “pork belly.”

  • Friend: 우리 삼겹살 시켜먹을까?
    Friend: Uri samgyeopsal sikyeomeogeulkka?
    Friend: “Shall we order some pork belly?”
  • You: 미안, 나 채식주의자야. 그래서 고기 못 먹어
    You: Mian, na chaesikjuuijaya. Geuraeseo gogi monmeogeo
    You: “Sorry, I’m vegetarian, so I can’t eat meat.”
  • Friend: 아 진짜? 몰랐네. 미안, 그럼 다른거 시켜먹자.
    Friend: A jinjja? mollanne. Mian, geureom dareungeo sikyeomeokja.
    Friend: “Oh really? I did not know. Sorry, let’s order something else.”

4- ~ 알러지있어요 (alleojiisseoyo) - “I am allergic to ~.”

This phrase means “I am allergic to ~,” and may be the most important restaurant phrase you learn today!

Are you allergic to peanuts? “Peanut” is called 땅콩 (ttangkong) in Korean. “Wheat” is called 밀 (mil).

To say that you’re allergic to something, just say the name of the food that you’re allergic to, followed by 알러지있어요 (alleojiisseoyo).

Example 1:
You’re allergic to peanuts and you want to ask if the snack you want to buy contains some nuts.

  • You: 제가 땅콩 알레르기가 있는데요, 이 과자 땅콩이 들어가 있나요?
    You: Jega ttangkong allereugiga inneundeyo, I gwaja ttangkongi deureoga innayo?
    You: “I am allergic to peanuts, I am wondering if this snack contains some peanuts?”
  • Staff: 확인해볼께요. 네, 들어가 있네요.
    Staff: Hwaginhaebolkkeyo. Ne, deureoga inneyo.
    Staff: “Let me have a check. Yes, it does.”

Example 2:
You’re currently staying with a Korean homestay family. The homestay father gave you chocolates and you want to say that you’re allergic to them.

  • You: 전 초콜릿에 알레르기가 있어서 먹을 때마다 기침을 해요.
    You: Jeon chokollise allereugiga isseoseo meogeul ttaemada gichimeul haeyo.
    You: “I am allergic to chocolates, so every time I eat I sneeze.”
  • Father: 그런데도 먹어?
    Father: Geureondedo meogeo?
    Father: “And you still eat chocolates?”
  • You: 네, 너무 맛이 있어서요.
    You: Ne, neomu masi isseoseoyo.
    You: “Yes, because it‘s too delicious. “

5- 와이파이 비밀번호는 뭐예요? (Waipai bimilbeonhoneun mwoyeyo?)

This phrase translates to “What is the password for Wifi?”

You’ll be startled at the speed of Internet services in South Korea. Moreover, free wifi services are available nearly everywhere—on the subway, KTX, at restaurants and cafes, etc. Most restaurants and cafes provide free wifi for customers, so ask for the password to access the free wifi.

Example 1:
You stopped by 엔제리너스커피 (Angel-in-Us Coffee) to take a break from a long walk, and you want to use free wifi.

  • You: 와이파이 비밀번호는 뭐예요?
    You: Waipai bimilbeonhoneun mwoyeyo?
    You: “What is the password for wifi?”
  • Waiter: 1234567890입니다.
    Waiter: I-ri-sam-sa-o-yuk-chil-pal-gu-yeong-imnida.
    Waiter: “It’s 1234567890.”
  • You: 감사합니다.
    You: Gamsahamnida.
    You: “Thank you.”

Do you want to learn more practical phrases to use at Korean restaurants? Check out “Vocabulary and Phrases for the Restaurant” on our website.

Navigating Through the Streets


5. Essential Korean Phrases: Asking for and Giving Directions

Survival Phrases

1- ___은 어떻게 가나요? (___eun eotteoke ganayo?)

This phrase translates as “How do I go to ~?” in English.

This is the phrase to use when you’re asking for detailed directions. Use this phrase to ask how to get somewhere, when there are many steps involved.

Example 1:
You’re asking your homestay father how to get to Busan from Daegu.

  • You: 부산에서 대구까지 어떻게 가나요?
    You: Busaneseo daegukkaji eotteoke ganayo?
    You: “How do I get to Busan from Daegu?”
  • Father: 부산역에서 KTX 열차 티켓을 하고나서…
    Father: Busanyeogeseo KTX yeolcha tikeseul hagonaseo…
    Father: “You need to buy a KTX ticket from a station called Busan station and ….”

2- ~은 어디에 있어요? (~eun eodie isseoyo?)

This phrase means “Where is ~?”

Example 1:
You’re at a shop and want to use the bathroom.

  • You: 화장실은 어디에 있어요?
    You: Hwajangsireun eodie isseoyo?
    You: “Where is the bathroom?”
  • Staff: 가게 밖으로 나가면 바로 오른쪽에 있어요.
    Staff: Gage bakkeuro nagamyeon baro oreunjjoge isseoyo.
    Staff: “Go out of the shop; the toilet is on the right-hand side.”

Example 2:
You feel tired after visiting many places and want to go back to the hotel to rest, but you’re not sure where the closest station is.

  • You: 여기서 가장 가까운 지하철역은 어디에 있어요?
    You: Yeogiseo gajang gakkaun jihacheollyeogeun eodie isseoyo?
    You: “Where is the closest subway station from here?”
  • Stranger: 횡단보도 건너면 홍대역이 보일거예요.
    Stranger: Hoengdanbodo geonneomyeon hongdaeyeogi boilgeoyeyo.
    Stranger: “Just cross the road and you’ll be able to see the station called Hongdae.”

3- Vocabulary for Directions

Here’s some useful vocabulary:

Vocabulary Romanization Translation
…쪽으로 …jjogeuro towards
마주보고 majubogo facing
옆에 yeope by
뒤에 dwie behind
오른쪽 oreunjjok right
왼쪽 oenjjok left

Reference: Position/Direction

There are several example sentences using these vocabulary words in our vocabulary list about positions and directions. Do check out the page for more learning material.

4- 여기는 어디인가요? (yeogineun eodiingayo?)

This phrase means “Where am I?”

When you’re not sure where you are, or you want to know the name of the place you’re at, use this phrase to ask. 어디 means “where” in Korean. If you want to double-check your location with someone, replace 어디 with the name of the place.

For example, if you want to know whether the place you’re in is 가로수길 (garosu-gil), you should ask 여기는 가로수길인가요? (yeogineun garosugiringayo?) which translates to “Am I in Garosu gil?”

Example 1:

  • You: 길을 잃었어요. 여기는 어디인가요?
    You: Gireul ileosseoyo. Yeogineun eodiingayo?
    You: “I am lost. Where am I?”
  • Stranger: 음… 어디로 가시는데요? 가는길 알려드릴께요.
    Stranger: Eum… eodiro gasineundeyo? Ganeungil allyeodeurilkkeyo.
    Stranger: “Hmm…where are you heading to? I may be able to tell you the way.”

Example 2:
You’re with a tour guide and you want to say how beautiful this place is.

  • You: 정말 아름다운 곳이네요. 여기는 어디인가요?
    You: Jeongmal areumdaun gosineyo. Yeogineun eodiingayo?
    You: “This place is really beautiful. Where is this place?”
  • Guide: 광화문이라고 하는 곳입니다. 아름답지요?
    Guide: Gwanghwamunirago haneun gosimnida. Areumdapjiyo?
    Guide: “It’s called Gwanghwamun. Isn’t it beautiful?”

5- 여기서 ~까지는 많이 먼가요/가까운가요? (yeogiseo ~kkajineun mani meongayo/gakkaungayo?)

This phrase means “From here to ~, is it far/close?”

Use this phrase when you want to ask how far or close something is from your current location.멀다 (meolda) is “far” and 가깝다 (gakkapda) is “close” in Korean. To make each word into a question, they become 먼가요? (meongayo) meaning “Is it far?” and 가까운가요? (gakkaungayo?) meaning “Is it close by?” respectively.

Example 1:
You’re at Daegu Station and want to go to Palgongsan, a tourist favorite in Daegu.

  • You: 팔공산은 여기서 많이 먼가요?
    You: Palgongsaneun yeogiseo mani meongayo?
    You: “Is Palgongsan far from here?”

Example 2:
You’ve just landed in Jeju International Airport. Your friend comes to pick you up and you’re waiting for a bus to go to your friend’s house.

  • You: (너의) 집은 여기서 많이 멀어?
    You: (neoui) Jibeun yeogiseo mani meoreo?
    You: “Is your house far from here?”
  • Friend: 음, 버스타고 한 20분 정도 가야해. 그렇게 멀진 않아.
    Friend: Eum, beoseutago han isipbun jeongdo gayahae. Geureoke meoljin ana.
    Friend: “Hmm, it takes about 20 minutes by bus. It’s not too far.”

Overflow of Water in a Village


6. Essential Korean Phrases: Emergencies

1- 도와주세요. (dowajuseyo.)

This phrase translates to “Please help me.”

When you’re in need of help, use this phrase to get people’s attention. Be careful when you use this phrase though, because the meaning changes depending on your intonation. You can also request help more formally by stating, 실례하지만 도와주시겠어요? (sillyehajiman dowajusigesseoyo?) which means “I am sorry to bother you, but could you please help?”

Example 1:
You were hiking at a mountain called 북한산 (bukansan) in Seoul and you injured yourself. You see a number of hikers not far from where you are.

  • You: 도와주세요! , 도와주세요!
    You: Dowajuseyo! Dowajuseyo!
    You: “Please help! Please help!”

Example 2:
You need to call an ambulance, and you go to a help desk for help.

  • You: 응급상황이예요, 도와주세요!
    You: Eunggeupsanghwangiyeyo, dowajuseyo!
    You: “It’s an emergency! Please help!”

2- 경찰 불러주세요. (gyeongchal bulleojuseyo.)

This phrase means “Please call the police.”

Use this phrase when you’re in danger. Alternatively, you can call the police by dialing 112. If you want to call an ambulance, which is called 응급차 (eunggeupcha) or 일일구 (irilgu), simply say the word followed by 불러주세요 (bulleojuseyo) meaning “Please call.”

Example 1:
You want to ask for help from a person at the service desk.

  • Help desk: 무엇을 도와드릴까요?
    Help desk: Mueoseul dowadeurilkkayo?
    Help desk: “How may I help you?”
  • You: 누가 지갑을 훔쳐갔어요, 경찰 불러주세요.
    You: Nuga jigabeul humchyeogasseoyo, gyeongchal bulleojuseyo.
    You: “My wallet is stolen and I would like to call the police.”
  • Help desk: 네, 지금 바로 하겠습니다.
    Help desk: Ne, jigeum baro hagetseumnida.
    Help desk: “Okay, will do it now.”

Example 2:
A stranger approaches you and tries to steal your bag.

  • You: 도와주세요! 누가 경찰 불러 주세요!
    You: Dowajuseyo! Nuga gyeongchal bulleo juseyo!
    You: “Please help! Call the police for me!”

3- ~를 다쳤어요. (~reul dachyeosseoyo.)

This phrase means “I injured my ~.”

When you visit a hospital, you need to be able to tell the doctor which part of your body is injured. Unless you go to an international hospital that offers a free interpreter service, you’ll need to speak basic Korean at a local hospital.

If you want to say that you’re just in pain, just say ~가 아파요. (~ga apayo) which means “I feel pain in my~.”

Here’s a vocabulary list of body parts for you to memorize:

Vocabulary Romanization Translation
머리 meori head
다리 dari leg(s)
손가락 songarak finger(s)
발목 balmok ankle(s)
무릎 mureup knee(s)
팔꿈치 palkkumchi elbow(s)
손목 sonmok wrist(s)
pal arm(s)

Reference: Body Parts, KoreanClass101 Vocabulary list

The vocabulary words above are just a small portion of the entire vocabulary list from KoreanClass101. If you want to check out the entire list, visit our Body Parts vocabulary list on our website. We also have many free lessons on describing body parts in Korean, so check our website for more.

Example 1:
You’re at a local hospital and need to explain which part of your body is injured.

  • Doctor: 무슨일로 오셨나요?
    Doctor: Museunillo osyeonnayo?
    Doctor: “What made you come here today?”
  • You: 산책하다가 발목을 다쳤어요.
    You: Sanchaekadaga balmogeul dachyeosseoyo.
    You: “I injured my ankle while walking.”
  • Doctor: 한번 살펴 보겠습니다.
    Doctor: Hanbeon salpyeo bogetseumnida.
    Doctor: “Let me have a look at your ankle.”

Example 2:
You weren’t cautious enough when crossing the pedestrian road. Unfortunately, you were run over by a car and your bone is broken.

  • You: 걸을 수가 없어요. 뼈를 다친것 같아요.
    You: Georeul suga eopseoyo. Ppyeoreul dachingeot gatayo.
    You: “I can’t walk. I think my bone is broken.”
  • Driver: (calling an ambulance) 여보세요, 차사고가 났는데요, 사람이 크게 다친것 같습니다.
    Driver: Yeoboseyo, chasagoga nanneundeyo, sarami keuge dachingeot gatseumnida.
    Driver: “Hello, there was a car accident and I think that the person is badly injured.”

4- 지갑/여권을 잃어버렸어요. (jigap/yeogwoneul ileobeoryeosseoyo.)

This phrase means “I lost my wallet/passport.”

Your wallet and passport are the most valuable items while traveling around the world, and you certainly don’t want to ruin your entire trip over missing items. Use this phrase when you want to say that you’ve lost your belongings.

Here’s a list of items that people may lose while traveling:

Vocabulary Romanization Translation
don money
티켓 tiket ticket
시계 sigye watch
악세사리 aksesari accessories
귀중품 gwijungpum valuable items

Example 1:
You’re about to head to the airport, and realize that your passport is missing.

  • You: 어머, 여권을 잃어버린것 같아.
    You: Eomeo, yeogwoneul ileobeoringeot gata.
    You: “Oh no, I think I lost my passport.”
  • Friend: 어디서 잃어버렸는데?
    Friend: Eodiseo ileobeoryeonneunde?
    Friend: “Where did you lose it?”

Example 2:

  • Friend: 어머, 지갑이 어디갔지?
    Friend: Eomeo, jigabi eodigatji?
    Friend: “Oh no, where is my wallet?”
  • You: 지갑을 잃어버렸어?
    You: Jigabeul ileobeoryeosseo?
    You: “Did you lose your wallet?”
  • Friend: 휴, 찾았다!
    Friend: Hyu, chajatda!
    Friend: “Phew, I found it!”

5- Emergency Numbers to Remember

These are numbers that come in handy when you’re in trouble:

  1. 112 - Police
  2. 119 - Ambulance
  3. 111 - National Security
  4. 113 - Reporting spies
  5. 182 - Missing persons

Here, you can learn more vocabulary and phrases: “Words and Phrases to Help You in an Emergency.”

A Group of Young People Chatting


7. Essential Korean Phrases: Flattery Phrases

1- 한국 음식을 좋아해요. (Hanguk eumsigeul joahaeyo.)

This phrase means “I like Korean food.”

Koreans tend to worry when they see foreigners eating spicy food—you’ll hear 너무 맵지 않나요? (neomu maepji annayo?) which is them asking you “Is it not too spicy for you?” or 조금 매운데, 괜찮아요? (jogeum maeunde, gwaenchanayo?) meaning “It’s a bit spicy, is this okay?” when you order a spicy dish.

Don’t worry too much when you hear this, because they’re actually complimenting you for trying Korean dishes and they really do hope that you enjoy the food.

To say a specific dish, just replace 한국 음식 (hanguk eumsik) meaning “Korean food” with the name of your favorite dish. For example, if you like 삼계탕 (samgyetang) or “ginseng chicken soup,” you can say 삼계탕(을) 좋아해요 (samgyetang(eul) joahaeyo). Let’s have a look at more examples below:

Example 1:

  • Friend: 어떤 음식 좋아해?
    Friend: Eotteon eumsik joahae?
    Friend: “What kind of cuisine do you like?”
  • You: 매운걸 좋아해서 한국 음식을 많이 좋아해.
    You: Maeungeol joahaeseo hanguk eumsigeul mani joahae.
    You: “I like spicy food, so I like Korean food very much.”
  • Friend: 잘됐다! 집근처에 맛집있는데, 같이 갈래?
    Friend: Jaldwaetda! jipgeuncheoe matjibinneunde, gachi gallae?
    Friend: “That’s great! There’s a good restaurant around here, do you want to go together?”

Example 2:

  • Elder person: 매운 음식 좋아해요?
    Elder person: Maeun eumsik joahaeyo?
    Elder person: “Do you like spicy food?”
  • You: 네, 좋아해요.
    You: Ne, joahaeyo.
    You: “Yes, I do.”

2- 한국문화에 관심이 많아요. (Hangungmunhwae gwansimi manayo.)

Use this phrase to say “I am interested in Korean culture.”

Has anyone ever asked you what made you become interested in Korea? ~에 관심이 많아요. (~e gwansimi manayo.) is a phrase to say that you “are interested in ~.” You can replace the first noun with something else, such as 한국 역사 (hanguk yeoksa) meaning “Korean history,” 케이팝 (keipap) meaning “K-pop,” 한국 드라마 (hanguk deurama) meaning “Korean drama,” and so forth.

Here are some examples:

Example 1:
Jamie is a new exchange student, and Sumi and Soyeon are talking.

  • 수미: 제이미가 왜 한국에 왔을까?
    Sumi: Jeimiga wae hanguge wasseulkka?
    Sumi: “I wonder what brought Jamie to South Korea.”
  • 소연: 한국문화에 관심이 많아서 여기로 왔데.
    Soyeon: Hangungmunhwae gwansimi manaseo yeogiro watde.
    Soyeon: “He is here because he is interested in Korean culture.”

Example 2:
Your friend asks why you’re interested in Korean culture. You want to say that you became interested in it after watching Korean dramas.

  • You: 한국 드라마를 좋아해서 한국문화에 관심이 많아요.
    You: Hanguk deuramareul joahaeseo hangungmunhwae gwansimi manayo.
    You: “I became interested in Korean culture because of Korean dramas.”

3- 한국 사람은 친절해요. (Hanguk sarameun chinjeolhaeyo.)

Use this phrase to say “Korean people are friendly.”

Koreans are friendly to tourists, so they will be happy to help you out when you’re in need of help. To say that Koreans are friendly, you can say 한국 사람은 친절해요 (Hanguk sarameun chinjeolhaeyo.).

Example 1:
A friend asked how your trip to Korea was. You want to compliment Korean people.

  • Friend: 한국 여행 어땠어?
    Friend: Hanguk yeohaeng eottaesseo?
    Friend: “How was your trip to Korea?”
  • You: 응, 재미있었어. 한국 사람은 정말 친절한것 같아.
    You: Eung, jaemiisseosseo. Hanguk sarameun jeongmal chinjeolhangeot gata.
    You: “Yeah, it was fun. Koreans are really friendly.”

Example 2:

  • You: 드라마를 보면 한국 사람들은 친절한것 같아.
    You: Deuramareul bomyeon hanguk saramdeureun chinjeolhangeot gata.
    You: “Based on Korean drama, I think that Koreans are friendly.”

4- 친구가 되고 싶어요. 페이스북/인스타그램 있어요? (chinguga doego sipeoyo. peiseubuk/inseutageuraem isseoyo?)

Use this phrase to say “I want to be your friend. Do you have a Facebook/Instagram?”

You’ll encounter many locals while traveling in South Korea. If you meet someone that you want to keep in touch with long-term, say this phrase.

Example 1:
You meet a local while traveling in Jeju and you want to keep in touch with her.

  • You: 친구가 되고 싶어요. 혹시 페이스북이나 인스타그램 있어요?
    You: Chinguga doego sipeoyo. hoksi peiseubugina inseutageuraem isseoyo?
    You: “I want to be your friend. Do you have a Facebook or Instagram by any chance?”
  • Friend: 페이스북은 없고, 인스타그램은 있어요.
    Friend: Peiseubugeun eopgo, inseutageuraemeun isseoyo.
    Friend: “I don’t have a Facebook account, but I use Instagram.”


8. Essential Korean Phrases: Useful Phrases to Go Through Language Problems

World Map

1- 영어 할 수 있어요? (Yeongeo hal su isseoyo?)

Use this phrase to ask someone “Can you speak English?”

Example 1:
A staff member is explaining something to you in Korean and you want to ask if they speak English.

  • You: 혹시 영어 할 수 있어요?
    You: Hoksi yeongeo hal su isseoyo?
    You: “Do you speak English by any chance?”
  • Staff: 죄송해요, 할수 없어요.
    Staff: Joesonghaeyo, halsu eopseoyo.
    Staff: “Sorry, no.”

2 - 적어주실래요? (jeogeojusillaeyo?)

This useful phrase means “Can you write it down?”

Example 1:
Your homestay mother suggests that you visit a museum called 전쟁기념관 (jeonjaengginyeomgwan) which is “The War Memorial of Korea,” in English. You want to search for this place on the Internet.

  • You: 전쟁기념관을 종이에 적어주실래요?
    You: Jeonjaengginyeomgwaneul jongie jeogeojusillaeyo?
    You: “Can you please write “The War Memorial of Korea” on the paper?”

Example 2:
A stranger is explaining the directions to go to 63 빌딩 (yuksam building) or the “63building, but it seems quite complicated.

  • You: 죄송하지만, 종이에 적어주실래요?
    You: Joesonghajiman, jongie jeogeojusillaeyo?
    You: “I am sorry, but could you please write the directions down?”

3- 죄송해요, 한국말 잘못해요. (Joesonghaeyo, hangungmal jalmothaeyo.)

Use this phrase to let someone know “I am sorry, I am not good at Korean.”

Example 1:
An elderly person approaches you with a smile and asks many questions in Korean. You want to say that you can’t speak Korean.

  • You: 죄송해요, 저는 한국말을 못해요.
    You: Joesonghaeyo, jeoneun hangungmareul mothaeyo.
    You: “I am sorry, I can’t speak Korean.”

Example 2:
A stranger approaches you and asks some questions in Korean. You want to understand what he’s saying.

  • You: 죄송해요, 한국말(을) 잘못해요. 조금 더 천천히 말해줄래요?
    You: Joesonghaeyo, hangungmal(eul) jalmothaeyo. Jogeum deo cheoncheonhi malhaejullaeyo?
    You: “Sorry, I am not good at Korean. Can you please speak slowly?”

4- 조금 더 천천히 말해주시겠어요? (jogeum deo cheoncheonhi malhaejusigesseoyo?)

This phrase, hinted at earlier, means “Can you please speak slowly?”

You may want to practice speaking in Korean as much as possible. However, sometimes you may struggle to understand the language, especially when someone speaks to you too quickly. Use this phrase to kindly ask a speaker to speak more slowly for you.

Example 1:
You’re on the phone to have food delivered. The staff member speaks too fast and you want him to slow down for you.

  • You: 죄송하지만, 조금 더 천천히 말해주시겠어요?
    You: Joesonghajiman, jogeum deo cheoncheonhi malhaejusigesseoyo?
    You: “I am sorry, but could you please slow down for me?”
  • Staff: 아, 죄송합니다.
    Staff: A, joesonghamnida.
    Staff: “Ah, I apologize.”

Example 2:
Your friend is upset about something and struggles to speak clearly.

    You: 미안, 너무 빨리 말을 해서 잘 못알아들었어. 조금만 더 천천히 말해줄래?
    You: Mian, neomu ppalli mareul haeseo jal mosaradeureosseo. Jogeumman deo cheoncheonhi malhaejullae?
    You: “Sorry, you spoke too fast so I didn’t quite catch you. Can you speak more slowly?”

5- 이것은 어떻게 읽나요? (Igeoseun eotteoke ingnayo?)

Use this phrase to ask someone “How do you read this?”

If you want to ask how to pronounce a word or sentence, say 이것은 어떻게 발음하나요? (Igeoseun eotteoke bareumhanayo?) or “How do I pronounce this?”

Example 1:

  • You: 이건 어떻게 읽어?
    You: Igeon eotteoke ilgeo?
    You: “How do I read this?”
  • Friend: 간장게장이라고 해.
    Friend: Ganjanggejangirago hae.
    Friend: “It is soy sauce raw crab.”

A Couple Looking at Paintings


9. Essential Korean Phrases: Buying Tickets at a Museum

1 - 성인 1장 주세요. (seongin hanjang juseyo.)

Use this phrase to say “One ticket (adult) please.”

There are many museums and exhibitions worth visiting in Korea. Most places, unless you go to a museum in a very rural area, offer pamphlets and free guides in many different languages, so you won’t have much trouble navigating.

However, since you’re a Korean learner, let’s learn some useful travel phrases!

Take a look at the column for the price at the Daerim museum. This is the typical column that you’ll see at any museum or exhibition that you go to in Korea. “Adult” in Korean is 성인 (seongin). “Children” is 어린이 (eorini) and “student” is 학생 (haksaeng).

Let’s take a look at two examples:

Example 1:
You arrive at 김치박물관 (gimchibangmulgwan) or “Museum Kimchikan.” You want to buy a ticket.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 성인 1장 주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, seongin hanjang juseyo.
    You: “Hello, one ticket (adult) please.”

Example 2:
You arrive at 전쟁기념관 (jeonjaengginyeomgwan) or “War Memorial of Korea.” You’re with your younger sister who is only fifteen years old.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 성인 1장이랑 어린이 1 장주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, seongin hanjangirang eorini hanjangjuseyo.
    You: “Hello, one adult and one child please.”

2- 팜플렛 주세요. (pampeullet juseyo)

Asking for pamphlets is easy too. You just need to use this phrase, which means “Please give me a pamphlet.” You’ll be able to get a pamphlet in many different languages at the counter.

Example 1:

  • Clerk: 몇장드릴까요.
    Clerk: Myeotjangdeurilkkayo.
    Clerk: “How many (tickets) would you like?”
  • You: 성인 1장 주세요.
    You: Seongin hanjang juseyo.
    You: “One adult, please.”
  • Clerk: 5,000원입니다. 팜플렛 필요하세요?
    Clerk: Ocheonwonimnida. Pampeullet pillyohaseyo?
    Clerk: “It’s 5,000 won. Do you need a pamphlet?”
  • You: 네, 영어 팜플렛 주세요.
    You: Ne, yeongeo pampeullet juseyo.
    You: “Yes, an English pamphlet please.”

3- 무료 가이드있나요? (muryo gaideuinnayo?)

Use this phrase to ask “Is there a free tour?”

Many museums offer free guides in English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese. Some places only offer them once per day, or even once per month, so do check their schedule on their website in advance if you want to participate.

Example 1:

  • You: 이곳에 무료 가이드 있나요?
    You: Igose muryo gaideu innayo?
    You: “Is there a free tour?”
  • Clerk: 네, 오늘 오후 5시에 영어로 진행되는 무료 가이드 있습니다.
    Clerk: Ne, oneul ohu daseotsie yeongeoro jinhaengdoeneun muryo gaideu itseumnida.
    Clerk: “Yes, there is one in English at 17:00 (5 PM).”

4- 오늘 특별한 행사 하나요? (Oneul teukbyeolhan haengsa hanayo?)

Want to know if a museum has any special events? Use this phrase to ask a clerk. It translates to “Is there a special event?”

Example 1:
You hear loud music coming out of the museum.

  • You: 오늘 특별한 행사 하나요?
    You: Oneul teukbyeolhan haengsa hanayo?
    You: “Is there a special event?”
  • Clerk: 네, 방금 시작했어요.
    Clerk: Ne, banggeum sijakaesseoyo.
    Clerk: “Yes, it has just started.”

5- 오디오 가이드 있나요? (odio gaideu innayo?)

Use this phrase to ask “Is there an audio guide?”

Example 1:

  • You: 영어 오디오 가이드 있나요?
    You: Yeongeo odio gaideu innayo?
    You: “Is there an audio guide?”
  • Clerk: 네, 있습니다. 몇개 드릴까요?
    Clerk: Ne, itseumnida. myeotgae deurilkkayo?
    Clerk: “Yes, there is. How many would you like?”
  • You: 한 개 주세요.
    You: Han gae juseyo.
    You: “Just one, please.”

A Lady Holding a DSLR Camera


10. Essential Korean Phrases: Taking Pictures

1- 이곳은 사진 찍어도 괜찮은 장소인가요? (igoseun sajin jjigeodo gwaenchaneun jangsoingayo?)

Use this phrase to ask “Is it okay to take a picture in this place?”

You can take pictures most places, but it’s always safe to ask if you’re not sure.

Example 1:
You’re at the museum and want to ask if you can take pictures.

  • You: 이곳은 사진 찍어도 괜찮은 장소인가요?
    You: Igoseun sajin jjigeodo gwaenchaneun jangsoingayo?
    You: “Is it okay to take pictures here?”
  • Staff: 네, 플래시 없이 해주십시오.
    Staff: Ne, peullaesi eopsi haejusipsio.
    Staff: “Yes, but without flash please.”

2- 사진 같이 찍어요. (sajin gachi jjigeoyo.)

This phrase translates to “Let’s take a picture together.”

Use this phrase when you want to take a picture with someone. Alternatively, you can ask for permission by asking 사진 같이 찍어도 괜찮아요? (Sajin gachi jjigeodo gwaenchanayo?) meaning “Is it okay to take a picture with you?”

Example 1:

  • You: 사진 같이 찍어요.
    You: Sajin gachi jjigeoyo.
    You: “Let’s take a picture together.”
  • Friend: 좋아요.
    Friend: Joayo.
    Friend: “OK.”

3- 사진 찍어주시겠어요? (Sajin jjigeojusigesseoyo?)

This phrase means “Can you please take a picture of us?”

Example 1:
You’re traveling alone in 전주한옥마을 (jeonjuhanongmaeul) or “Jeonju Hanbok Village” and you want to ask someone to take a picture of you with a traditional Korean house in the background.

  • You: 죄송하지만, 사진 찍어주시겠어요?
    You: Joesonghajiman, sajin jjigeojusigesseoyo?
    You: “I am sorry to interrupt, but could you please take a picture of me?”
  • Stranger: 그럼요.
    Stranger: Geureomyo.
    Stranger: “Sure.”

Example 2:
You’re at 롯데월드 (rotdewoldeu) or “Lotte World” and want to ask someone to take a picture of you and your girlfriend.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 저희 사진 1장만 찍어주시겠어요?
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, jeohui sajin 1jangman jjigeojusigesseoyo?
    You: “Hello, could you please take a picture of us?”
  • Stranger: 그럼요.
    Stranger: Geureomyo.
    Stranger: “Sure.”

Someone Holding Miniature Korean Flag


11. How KoreanClass101.com Can Help You with Korean

If you have any questions regarding the travel phrases mentioned above (or other questions about Korean culture), we’ll be more than happy to answer them for you at the KoreanClass101.com forum. On our site, especially the forum, you can find tons of cultural insights and useful tips to help you study Korean. Feel free to check out the forum when you have time.

Also, KoreanClass101.com offers many free Korean lessons; you can access these lessons by simply creating a free lifetime account.

Learning Korean travel phrases, along with essential cultural information, is no easy task. But the more that you use Korean travel phrases, the easier it will get. Trust us!

We hope that you found this blog useful, and that you enjoy your trip to Korea! These basic Korean travel phrases for tourists will help you get around South Korea like it’s nothing. :)
Log

The 6 Dialects of South Korea and Ways to Distinguish

Depending on where you’re from in South Korea, people speak with a different accent. This is called 방언 (bangeon) or 사투리 (saturi) in Korean. Also, the Korean language that you learn is standard Korean language, which is the Gyeonggi dialect. We won’t go into too much detail about how Gyeonggi dialect and the standard Korean language differ, since this is a very complicated topic. Instead, we’re going to introduce something more interesting; we’re going to introduce six different dialects in South Korea and how you can distinguish between them.

The important message to you is that we don’t expect you to memorize the different dialect usage. Just note that there are different dialects in South Korea and that they sound different. Once you know these dialects, your trip will be more interesting since you’ll be able to recognize the different sounds and accents.

Table of Contents

  1. 경기 방언 (Gyeonggi dialect)
  2. 강원 방언 (Gangwon dialect)
  3. 충청 방언 (Chungcheong dialect)
  4. 경상 방언 (Gyeongsang dialect)
  5. 전라도 방언 (Jeollado dialect)
  6. 제주 방언 (Jeju dialect)

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Korean Dialects

1. 경기 방언 (Gyeonggi dialect)

Seoul

경기 방언 (gyeonggi bangeon), or the Gyeonggi dialect, is used in a number of areas in South Korea and is concentrated in Seoul and Incheon. This dialect is the standard language that you’ll learn when you study Korean, and it’s used in most of the TV shows, radio stations, news channels, and so on. Everyone in Korea will understand this dialect, even if the person whom you’re speaking to uses a different dialect.

Let’s listen to 경기방언: Just to give you an idea of what the gyeonggi dialect (a.k.a. Seoul dialect) sounds like, you can watch this video.

1- Characteristics of Gyeonggi dialect:

1 - They change ㅗ sounds to ㅜ
Example:

  • 먹고 싶다 (meokgo sipda) or “I want to eat” -> 먹구 싶다 (meokgu sipda) or “I want to eat”
  • ~하기도 하다 (~hagido hada) or “sometimes I~” -> 하기두 하다 (~hagidu hada) or “sometimes I~”

2 - You add an extra consonant such as ㄹ to a word
Example:

  • 이거로 (igeoro) or “this one” -> 이걸로 or 이걸루 (igeollo or igeollu) meaning “this one”

2. 강원 방언 (Gangwon dialect)

Korean Flag

강원 방언 (Gangwon dialect) is spoken in 강원 (Gangwon) which is located in Northeast South Korea. This place is famous for having many mountains and forests. Also, the Pyeongchang Olympic was hosted in this province in 2018.

Let’s listen to 강원 방언 (Gangwon dialect): Pay attention to the grandmother in this video, as she speaks with a very strong 강원 (gangwon) dialect.

1- Characteristics of 강원 방언 (Gangwon dialect):

1 - They pronounce ㅆ as ㅅ
Example:

  • 쌀 (ssal) meaning “rice” -> 살 (sal)
  • 싸움 (ssaum) meaning “fight” -> 사움 (saum)
  • 쓰레기 (sseuregi) -> 스레기 (seuregi)

2- They changeㅏ to ㅓ at the end of a sentence
Example:

  • 합시다 (hapsida) meaning “let’s do this” -> 합시더 (hapsideo)
  • 남자 (namja) meaning “man” -> 머스마 (meoseuma)

3 - They use various words at the end of a question, such as -나, -노, -고, -가, and so on
Example:

  • 비 와? (bi wa?) meaning “is it raining?” -> 비오나? (biona?)
  • 누구 책이야? (nugu chaegiya?) meaning “whose book is it?” -> 누 책인고? (nu chaegingo?)
  • 어디가? (eodiga?) meaning “where are you going?” -> 어데 가노? (eode gano?)

2- Example of 강원 방언 (Gangwon dialect):

강원방언 (Gangwon dialect) is underlined in these example sentences.

  • 여러분께 알려드립니다.
    yeoreobunkke allyeodeurimnida.
    “I would like to make an announcement to you.”
    여러분들인데 알코 디레요. (yeoreobundeurinde alko direyo.)
  • 큰일났어요.
    keunillasseoyo.
    “We have a problem.”
    클나싸요. (keullassayo.)
  • 어디 계십니까?
    eodi gyesimnikka?
    “Where are you?” (honorific expression)
    어데 간? (eode gan?)
  • 그것은 무엇입니가?
    geugeoseun mueosimniga?
    “What is this?”
    그건 머인? (geugeon meoin?)
  • 지금까지 잤어?
    jigeumkkaji jasseo?
    “You slept until now?”
    여적 잔? (yeojeok jan?)
  • 저기 있는 저 아이는 누구입니까?
    jeogi inneun jeo aineun nuguimnikka?
    “Who is the child over there?”
    쟈는 누꼬? (jyaneun nukko?)
  • 어머, 어떡하면 좋아!
    eomeo, eottekhamyeon joa!
    “Oh my goodness, what should I do!”
    우아노! (uano!)

3. 충청 방언 (Chungcheong dialect)

Korean Alphabet

The 충청 방언 (Chungcheong dialect) is commonly used in many regions of South Korea, mainly concentrated in 충청북도 and 충청남도, which are both located right below 서울 경기도.

Let’s listen to 충청 방언 (Chungcheong dialects): Are you interested in what 충청 방언 sounds like? Listen to the dialogue of these two MCs in this video. The lady in the red dress speaks the standard Korean language and the man on the left speaks with a very strong 충청 방언 (Chungcheong dialect).

1- Characteristics of 충청 방언 (Chungcheong dialects)

1 - If the last word of the sentence ends with ㅐ or ㅔ, it changes to ㅑ
Example:

  • 피곤해 (pigonhae) meaning “I feel tired” -> 피곤햐 (pigonhya)
  • 뱀 (baem) meaning “snake” -> 뱜 (byam)
  • 뱀에게 물렸대 (baemege mullyeotdae) meaning “someone was beaten by a snake” -> 뱜한태 물렸댜 (byamhantae mullyeotdya)

2 - If the last word of a sentence ends with 야, it changes to 여
Example:

  • 아니야 (aniya) meaning “be not” -> 아니여 (aniyeo)
  • 뭐야? (mwoya?) meaning “what is it?” -> 뭐여 (mwoyeo)

2- Example of 충청 방언 (Chungcheong dialects)

Let’s look at some more examples. (We underlined the Chungcheong dialect examples for you.)

학교에서 (hakgyoeseo) “at school”
A: 왜그래 뭐 화나는 일 있어?
A: waegeurae mwo hwananeun il isseo?
A: “What’s the matter?”
A: 왜 그랴? 뭐 씅깔나는일 있어? (wae geurya? mwo sseungkkallaneunil isseo?)

B: 아침에 버스 놓쳐서 택시타고 왔어
B: achime beoseu nochyeoseo taeksitago wasseo.
B: “Yeah, I missed the bus so I took a taxi this morning.”
B: 어, 아침에 버스 뼈서 택시타고 왔어. (eo, achime beoseu ppyeoseo taeksitago wasseo.)

A: 근데 태산이는?
A: geunde taesanineun?
A: “But where is Taesan?”
A: 근데 태산이는? (geunde taesanineun?)

B: 응, 머리에 돌 맞아서 입원했대.
B: eung, meorie dol majaseo ibwonhaetdae.
B: “Yeah, he was hospitalized because he was hit by a stone on his head.”
B: 응, 대굼빡에 독짝 맞아서 입원했댜. (eung, daegumppage dokjjak majaseo ibwonhaetdya.)

A: 그래?
A: geurae?
A: “Really?”
A: 기여? (giyeo?)

4. 경상 방언 (Gyeongsang dialect)

Busan

The 경상 방언 (Gyeongsang dialect) is commonly used in the Gyeongsang region of South Korea. Cities that use this dialect are Busan, Daegu, and Ulsan.

Let’s listen to 경상 방언 (Gyeongsang dialect): Watch this video of two people with different dialects. The guy on the left speaks 경기 방언 (gyeonggi bangeon) or the “Gyeonggi dialect” and the lady on the right speaks with the 전라 방언 (Jeolla dialect). Can you hear the difference?

1- Characteristics of 경상 방언 (Gyeongsang dialect)

1 - There are a number of words that they change:

  • 으 becomes 어
  • 의 becomes 에
  • 그 becomes 거
  • ㅚ becomes ㅐ
  • ㅟ becomesㅣor ㅡ

Example:

  • 저쪽 위에 있다. (jeojjok wie itda.) meaning “It’s over there.” -> 저짜 우에 있데이. (jeojja ue itdei.)
  • 왜 안 되냐? (wae an doenya?) meaning “Why can’t I?” -> 와 안대노? (wa andaeno?)
  • 뒤에 있다. (dwie itda.) meaning “It is behind you.” -> 디에 있다. (die itda.)

2 - They shorten sentences
Example:

  • 뭐라고 했니? (mworago haenni?) meaning “What did you say?” -> 뭐라카노? (mworakano?)
  • 왜 그러십니까? (wae geureosimnikka?) meaning “Why?” -> 와 그라노? (wa geurano?)
  • 가 버려라 (ga beoryeora) meaning “go away” -> 가뿌라 (gappura)

3 - Sentences that end with ~다 become ~데이
Example:

  • 같이 합시다. (gachi hapsida.) meaning “Let’s go together.” -> 같이 합시데이. (gachi hapsidei.)
  • 내가 왔다. (naega watda.) meaning “I am here” -> 내가 왔데이. (naega watdei.)

4 - Interrogative sentences that end with ~니 become ~나, ~노, ~고, or ~가
Example:

비 오니? (bi oni?) meaning “Is it raining?” -> 비 오나? (bi ona?)
누구 책이니? (nugu chaegini?) meaning “Whose book is it?” -> 누 책이고? (nu chaegigo?)
어디 가니? (eodi gani?) meaning “Where are you going?” -> 어데 가노? (eode gano?)

2- Example of 경상 방언 (Gyeongsang dialect)

Let’s look at some more examples. (We underlined the Gyeongsang dialect examples for you.)

  • 아이구 셔
    aigu syeo
    “How sour it is”
    아구 샤구랍어래이~ (agu syagurabeoraei~)
  • 제대로 해라.
    jedaero haera.
    “Do it properly.”
    단디 해라이. (dandi haerai.)
  • 괜히 이렇게 해놨네
    gwaenhi ireoke haenwanne
    “I should not have done like this”
    맥지 이캐놨네 (maekji ikaenwanne)

5. 전라도 방언 (Jeollado dialect)

Hangul

Let’s listen to 전라도 방언 (Jeollado bangeon): This is a commercial video aired in South Korea. Listen to the lady in this video; she speaks with a Jeollado dialect.

1- Characteristics of 전라 방언 (jeolla bangeon)

1 - They add ~잉, ~부러, ~ 쟤, and so on, at the end of a sentence
Example:

  • 그렇습니다.
    geureoseumnida.
    “Yes it is.”
    그라죠잉~ (geurajyoing~)
  • 추천을 하세요
    chucheoneul haseyo
    “Recommend”
    추천 하쇼잉! (chucheon hasyoing!)

2 - They have many exclamatory expressions

  • 어머 -> 오메. 왐마
  • 저기요 -> 아야
  • 어떻하지 -> 어찌아스까나
  • 그래서 -> 근디

3 - They use 거시기 (“thing”) a lot
Example:

  • 아 왜 그 왜 있잖아. 그 아이의 이름이 기억나지가 않아…..
    “You know that person. I can’t remember the name of that person.”

    내가 어제 거시기랑 거시가 하다가 가 거시기한데 거시기했는데
    naega eoje geosigirang geosiga hadaga ga geosigihande geosigihaenneunde
    아따 거 머시기 있냐, 그놈아 이름이 기억이 안나부러….
    atta geo meosigi innya, geunoma ireumi gieogi annabureo….

2- Example of 전라 방언 (jeolla bangeon)

Here, as always, the jeolla bangeon is underlined in the examples below.

  • 너 그거 좀 버리지 않을래?
    neo geugeo jom beoriji aneullae?
    “Can you throw this away?”
    너 그것좀 찌끄라뿌러야? (neo geugeotjom jjikkeurappureoya?)
  • 지금 당장
    jigeum dangjang
    “Immediately”
    시방 (sibang)
  • 빨리
    ppalli
    “Quickly”
    아따 싸게싸게 댕겨오쇼 (atta ssagessage daenggyeoosyo)
  • 조금 (jogeum)
    “A little of”
    쪼깨 (jjokkae)

6. 제주 방언 (Jeju dialect)

Jeju

제주 방언 (jeju bangeon) meaning “Jeju dialect” is only spoken on the Jeju Island. Jeju Island is located in the southwest coast of South Korea and takes about 45 minutes to travel to from Seoul by an airplane. The Jeju dialect is one of the most difficult dialects to understand in South Korea, because they have their own language. Therefore, Koreans from different regions have difficulties trying to understand Jeju dialect.

Let’s listen to 제주 방언 (Jeju bangeon): Have a listen to this conversation between these two males in this video. It’s about a miscommunication between Jeju local and non-Jeju local at a military base, and you’ll be able to distinguish who’s from Jeju instantly, by listening to the conversation.

1- Characteristics of 제주 방언 (Jeju bangeon):

If you want to know how the Jeju dialect is different from the standard language, here’s an explanation of characteristics of the Jeju dialect.

1 - Jeju dialect is perhaps the most difficult dialect in South Korea, since it has its own language
Example:

  • 어서 오십시오 (eoseo osipsio) meaning “Welcome to” -> 혼저 옵서 (honjeo opseo).
  • 와서 보고 가세요 (waseo bogo gaseyo) meaning “Please come and have a look” -> 왕 봥 갑서 (wang bwang gapseo)

* You will see a message saying 혼저 옵서 (honjeo opseo) on the wall when you land in the Jeju airport, so pay close attention to it next time you’re traveling to Jeju Island.

2 - They tend to combine words at the end of a sentence
In Jeju, they combine the last two words, so instead of ~었니, it becomes ~먹언.
Example:

  • 밥 먹었니? Meaning “Did you have some food?” -> 밥 먹언?
  • 이거 했어? -> 이거 핸?
  • 알았어 -> 알안

2- Example of 제주 방언 (Jeju dialects)

Here are some examples of the Jeju dialect, compared to the standard. The Jeju examples are underlined.

  • 여기서 서울에 전화할 수 있지요?
    yeogiseo seoure jeonhwahal su itjiyo?
    “Can I call Seoul from here?”
    여기서 서울더레 해집주양? (yeogiseo seouldeore haejipjuyang?)
  • 어디서 오셨습니까?
    eodiseo osyeotseumnikka?
    “Where are you from?”
    어디서 옵데가? (eodiseo opdega?)
  • 조금만 계십시오.
    jogeumman gyesipsio.
    “Please wait a moment.”
    호꼼만 이십서게. (hokkomman isipseoge.)
  • 차를 타고 가세요.
    chareul tago gaseyo.
    “Go there by car.”
    차탕갑서 (chatanggapseo)
  • 오천 원입니다.
    ocheon wonimnida.
    “It is 5,000 won.”
    오천 원마씀. (ocheon wonmasseum.)
  • 어제 영화 뭐 봤어?
    “What movie did you watch?”
    제 영화 뭐 봔?

7. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Korean

Lastly, let’s compare dialects!

Dialect “Welcome” “Grandmother”
경기도
(gyeonggido)
어서오세요.
(eoseooseyo.)
할머니
(halmeoni)
강원도
(gangwondo)
어여 오드래요.
(eoyeoodeuraeyo.)
할머이
(halmeoi)
충청도
(chungcheongdo)
빨리 와유.
(ppalli wayu.)
할매
(halmae)
경상도
(gyeongsangdo)
퍼뜩 오이소.
(peotteuk oiso.)
할무이
(halmui)
전라도
(jeollado)
언능 오랑께요.
(eonneung orangkkeyo.)
할매
(halmae)
제주도
(jejudo)
혼저 옵서예.
(honjeo opseoye.)
할망
(halmang)
Dialect “Mother” “I am sorry”
경기도
(gyeonggido)
어머니
(eomeoni)
죄송합니다.
(joesonghamnida.)
강원도
(gangwondo)
어머이
(eomeoi)
미안 하우다.
(mian hauda.)
충청도
(chungcheongdo)
엄니
(eomni)
죄송해유.
(joesonghaeyu.)
경상도
(gyeongsangdo)
어무이
(eomui)
죄송합니데이.
(joesonghamnidei.)
전라도
(jeollado)
어머이
(eomeoi)
죄송혀라.
(joesonghyeora.)
제주도
(jejudo)
어멍
(eomeong)
죄송허우다.
(joesongheouda.)


In summary, we had a look at six different dialects in South Korea. The fact is, South Korea has more than six dialects. What we introduced today in this article are the most famous dialects in Korea. Since you learned how to distinguish each dialect, you’ll be able to spot the different dialects next time you watch a Korean drama or movie!

In addition, KoreanClass101 has many study materials that you can download for free. Also, have you come across any Korean words that you don’t know? Look them up in the KoreanClass101 dictionary with free audio for you to practice pronunciation! We’re here to help you improve your Korean, so feel free to use our website anytime.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Korean Dialects

Things to Do in South Korea in October

October is the autumn season in South Korea. The leaves on the mountains start to change, becoming red and yellow in hue, and viewing autumn leaves is one of the most popular activities in South Korea. There are also many October festivals and events held during this time that you won’t want to miss out on.

In this blog post, KoreanClass101 will explain to you about what to expect when you travel to South Korea, such as the weather, important public holidays, what to wear in October, and even where to see fall colors in South Korea. In addition, we’re going to introduce a number of October activities and events held in South Korea so that you can add these to your travel itinerary to maximize your trip.

Visiting South Korea in autumn will be fun and easy once you take this info to heart and put it to practice!

October

1. Everything You Need to Know about October in Korea

Weather is just one of those things that travelers check before visiting a country, and for good reason. This way, they know exactly what to expect when they arrive and what clothing to bring with them. In Korea, there are four seasons each year and each season has its own distinctive weather conditions. Below is the weather information, important public holidays, and autumn clothing ideas for South Korea in October.

Weather in South Korea

1- October Weather in South Korea

Here’s some information about fall weather in South Korea in the main cities: Seoul, Daegu, Cheongju, Busan, and Jeju.

City Highest Temp. Lowest Temp. Average Temp. Rainfall
Seoul
[서울]
19.5°C
67.1°F
8.2°C
46.8°F
13.8°C
56.8°F
52mm
2in
Daegu
[대구]
21.3°C
70.3°F
9°C
48.2°F
15.1°C
59.2°F
45mm
1.8in
Cheongju
[청주]
20.4°C
66.7°F
6.8°C
44.2°F
13.6°C
56.5°F
45mm
1.8in
Busan
[부산]
21.2°C
70.2°F
12°C
53.6°F
16.6°C
61.9°F
68mm
2.7in
Jeju
[제주]
21.2°C
70.2°F
13.8°C
56.8°F
17.5°C
72.7°F
64mm
2.5in


※ Reference: climate-data.org

Autumn usually starts in October in South Korea. The weather is warm during the day and becomes cold in the evening. Therefore, it’s important to understand that day-to-night temperature fluctuates significantly; for that reason, many Koreans catch a cold during this time. Make sure to wear many layers to avoid this fate yourself!

Autumn, especially in October, is the best season to travel to South Korea because of the autumn leaves and the autumn flowers covering entire mountains, making South Korea one of the most popular travel destinations in Asia—and one of the most beautiful.

Korean Holiday

2- October Public Holidays in South Korea

Here are two main public holidays in October:

October 3: 개천절 (gaecheonjeol) — “National Foundation Day”

October 9: 한글날 (hangeullal) — “Hangul Proclamation Day”

Because there are two public holidays in October in South Korea, there will be festivals and events held on these two days. On Hangul Day—which is the day that the Korean alphabet was created under 세종대왕 (“Sejong the Great”) during the Chosun Dynasty (1393 to 1910)—there will be a celebration ceremony around the statue of King Sejong, which is located near Gyeongbokgung (경복궁). You won’t want to miss out on this!

Autumn Fashion

3- Autumn Fashion in South Korea

Since the day-to-night temperature fluctuates a lot in October, you need to pay more attention to your clothing. Layering your clothes is the key, and people carry a coat or a warm cardigan in their bag at all times. Wearing a pair of long boots or sandals isn’t recommended because of the temperature difference during the day and the night, so it’s recommended to wear an appropriate pair of shoes—one that can be worn comfortably regardless of the weather conditions you find yourself in.
Also, it occasionally rains, which results in sudden temperature drops; be sure to have an umbrella with you while traveling. If you don’t have one, just about all convenience stores sell transparent umbrellas, prices ranging from 1,000 to 3,000 KRW.

2. Activities to do in Korea

Autumn Festival

1- Autumn Festivals

As mentioned previously, autumn is the best season in South Korea. During this time, many festivals are held at night, and you’ll be able to enjoy spending your time celebrating in the evening without feeling too hot or cold. Here are some of the best places to visit in South Korea during autumn:

  • 서울밤도깨비야시장 (“Seoul Bamdokkaebi Night Market”)

This night market is definitely a must-visit market in South Korea because of the unique experience it offers. Bamdokkaebi Night Market is open from March 30 to October 28, 2018. The night market opens at night and disappears by morning, allowing many tourists to enjoy the true local lifestyle in a friendly atmosphere.

They sell traditional items, handmade products, and traditional Korean food, as well as organize many night events. Also, Bamdokkaebi Night Market is held at a number of locations in Seoul such as Yeouido (여의도), Banpo (반포), Cheonggyecheon (청계천), and so on. So check out their website, which is available in English, Chinese, and Japanese, to decide which market to explore.

  • 부산불꽃축제 (“Busan Fireworks Festival”)

Busan Fireworks Festival is one of the biggest events held in Busan, and attracts many tourists from Korea and other countries. It’s a one-day event, on the 27th of October in 2018. The fireworks are done by the famous beach called Gwangalli Beach (광안리해수욕장; map) in addition to many street performances and food stalls. To give you a clearer idea of what to expect, here’s an article from 2015 with beautiful pictures of the fireworks.

For more information about this festival, visit this website, which is also available in different languages including Japanese, French, Chinese, English, Spanish, German, and Thai.

  • 하동북천 코스모스 메밀꽃 축제 (“Hadong Bukcheon Cosmos and Buckwheat Festival”)

While in Korea, you’ll be able to see a number of fields of cosmos flowers, colorfully decorating the area. Here in Bukcheon, there’s a famous Cosmos and Buckwheat festival held every year, attracting many people all around the world. This year, the festival is going to be held from the 21st of September to the 7th of October. You can check out this website for more information about this festival, and even check out some pictures from this festival so you’ll know what to expect.

  • 민둥산억새꽃축제 (“Mindung Mountain Eulalia Festival”)

When you see a field of Chinese silver grass, Koreans know that it means the autumn is officially started in Korea. Can you imagine a place where an entire mountain is covered with Chinese silver grass? At Mindungsan Mountain (민둥산), you’ll be able to experience this. This festival starts on September 21 and ends on November 4. There are many activities that you can enjoy, such as climbing, photo competitions, and much more.

  • Want to Know More Festivals and Events in October?

Check out “visitkorea” for more attractions. Simply click on a month and a date, and they’ll show you the list of 2018 festivals and events.

Mountain Climbing

2- Hiking and Mountain Climbing

You’ll be mesmerized by the fall colors emblazoning Korea in rich red, yellow, and orange hues. You can’t miss out on hiking in South Korea for some unforgettable scenery!
The 10 Best Mountains for Autumn Foliage in Korea

1 - 설악산 (“Seoraksan National Park”) — location

  • Autumn foliage period: Beginning of October to mid-November
  • Autumn foliage images from Seoraksan National Park
  • 2 - 내장산 (“Naejangsan National Park”) — location

    3 - 대둔산 (Daedunsan) — location

    4 - 백양사 (Baegyangsa) — location

    • Autumn foliage period: Mid-October to mid-November
    • The temple is located in the middle of 내장산 (“Naejang Mountain” — location)
    • Autumn foliage images from Baegyangsa

    5 - 용문사 (“Yongmunsa Temple”) — location

    • Autumn foliage period: Mid-October to mid-November
    • The temple is located in the middle of 용문산 (“Yongmunsan Mountain” — location)
    • Autumn foliage images from Yongmunsa Temple

    6 - 오대산 (“Odaesan National Park”) — location

    7 - 설악산 (“Seoraksan National Park”) — location

    • Autumn foliage period: Mid-October to early November
    • Autumn foliage images from Seoraksan National Park

    8 - 한라산 (Hallasan) — location

    • Autumn foliage period: Late October to mid-November
    • Autumn foliage images from Hallasan

    9 북한산 (Bukhansan) — location

    10 팔공산 (Palgongsan) — location

    3- Beaches

    Visiting beaches in South Korea may not be the most popular activity to do around this time of year, but you’ll still be able to enjoy spending time there since the summer holiday season is over and locals are now visiting mountains to enjoy the fall leaves. You can enjoy sunbathing during the day, as well as food by any of the outdoor restaurants around these beaches in South Korea. Check out “Famous Beaches in Korea” if you want to have a list of places to visit.

    Hanbok

    3. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Korean

    In summary, we’ve looked at autumn temperatures and what to wear in South Korea. We also introduced a number of festivals and events that you can enjoy participating in, along with the famous mountain destinations for autumn foliage in South Korea. Beaches aren’t popular destinations in October, but you can definitely enjoy the quietness of the ocean in October, since October is the time when locals visit the colorful mountains instead.

    Here are some vocabularies related to autumn and traveling. We also have many other lessons related to traveling to Korea, so you might want to check them out on our website as well.

    Autumn Korean Vocabulary

    • 코스모스 (koseumoseu) — “cosmos”
    • 다람쥐 (daramjwi) — “squirrel”
    • 도토리 (dotori) — “acorn”
    • 억새 (eoksae) — “Chinese silver grass”
    • 솔방울 (solbangul) — “conifer cone”
    • 밤 (bam) — “chestnut”
    • 감 (gam) — “persimmon”
    • 은행나무 (eunhaengnamu) — “Maidenhair tree”
    • 단풍잎 (danpungip) — “maple leaf”
    • 가을 (gaeul) — “autumn”
    • 고추잠자리 (gochujamjari) — “dragonfly”
    • 허수아비 (heosuabi) — “scarecrow”
    • 하늘 (haneul) — “sky”

    Here’s another list of Must-know Autumn Vocabularies for you to improve your Korean vocabulary skills. Also, here are lists of phrases to memorize before traveling to South Korea. If they’re difficult to memorize, try to write some of the key phrases down in your notebook and show them to locals when you’re in South Korea.

    We hope you enjoy your trip to South Korea in October and that you’ll share your experience in the comment section.

    How to Say Happy New Year in Korean & New Year Wishes

    Learn all the Korean New Year wishes online, in your own time, on any device! Join KoreanClass101 for a special Korean New Year celebration!

    How to Say Happy New Year in Korean

    Can you relate to the year passing something like this: “January, February, March - December!”? Many people do! Quantum physics teaches us that time is relative, and few experiences illustrate this principle as perfectly as when we reach the end of a year. To most of us, it feels like the old one has passed in the blink of an eye, while the new year lies ahead like a very long journey! However, New Year is also a time to celebrate beginnings, and to say goodbye to what has passed. This is true in every culture, no matter when New Year is celebrated.

    So, how do you say Happy New Year in Korean? Let a native teach you! At KoreanClass101, you will learn how to correctly greet your friends over New Year, and wish them well with these Korean New Year wishes!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    Table of Contents

    1. How to Celebrate New Year in Korea
    2. Must-Know Korean Words & Phrases for the New Year!
    3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions in Korean
    4. Inspirational New Year Quotes
    5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes
    6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages
    7. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You Learn Korean

    But let’s start with some vocabulary for Korean New Year celebrations, very handy for conversations.

    1. How to Celebrate New Year in Korea

    Did you know every Korean get 1 year older on January 1st on New Year’s Day? Yes, that’s how Korean age works and how Koreans get older, and that’s why New Year’s Day is more special in Korea.

    There are two New Year’s Day in Korea; one is 구정 (gujeong) and 신정 (sinjeong.) 구정 (gujeong) is the New Year holiday based on the lunar calendar. It’s considered more traditional than the other one, 신정 (sinjeong), which is based on the solar calendar.

    During the traditional new year holiday, family get-togethers take place. However, recently fewer and fewer people are visiting their hometown during 구정 (gujeong), because of the heavy traffic jams from Seoul to other cities. Instead, more and more people are visiting their family on 신정 (sinjeong), the New Year holiday on the solar calendar, or other weekends. Moreover, sometimes parents visit their sons’ or daughters’ houses instead. In Korean, this trend is called 역귀성 (yeok-gwiseong) which means “Reversed homecoming.” As it takes too much time to go from Seoul to other cities, the parents take a trip to Seoul instead.

    Happy New Year!
    새해 복 많이 받으세요!
    Saehae bok mani badeuseyo.

    2. Must-Know Korean Words & Phrases for the New Year!

    Korean Words & Phrases for the New Year

    1- Year


    nyeon

    This is pretty self-explanatory. Most countries follow a Gregorian calendar, which has approximately 365 days in a year, while in some cultures, other year designations are also honored. Therefore, New Year’s day in Korea could fall on a different day than in your country. When do you celebrate New Year?

    2- Midnight

    자정
    jajeong

    The point in time when a day ends and a new one starts. Many New Year celebrants prefer to stay awake till midnight, and greet the new annum as it breaks with fanfare and fireworks!

    3- New Year’s Day

    새해 첫날
    saehae cheonnal

    In most countries, the new year is celebrated for one whole day. On the Gregorian calendar, this falls on January 1st. On this day, different cultures engage in festive activities, like parties, parades, big meals with families and many more.

    4- Party

    파티
    pati

    A party is most people’s favorite way to end the old year, and charge festively into the new one! We celebrate all we accomplished in the old year, and joyfully anticipate what lies ahead.

    5- Dancing


    chum

    Usually, when the clock strikes midnight and the New Year officially begins, people break out in dance! It is a jolly way to express a celebratory mood with good expectations for the year ahead. Also, perhaps, that the old year with its problems has finally passed! Dance parties are also a popular way to spend New Year’s Eve in many places.

    6- Champagne

    샴페인
    syampein

    Originating in France, champagne is a bubbly, alcoholic drink that is often used to toast something or someone during celebrations.

    7- Fireworks

    불꽃놀이
    bulkkotnori

    These are explosives that cause spectacular effects when ignited. They are popular for announcing the start of the new year with loud noises and colorful displays! In some countries, fireworks are set off to scare away evil spirits. In others, the use of fireworks is forbidden in urban areas due to their harmful effect on pets. Most animals’ hearing is much more sensitive than humans’, so this noisy display can be very frightful and traumatising to them.

    8- Countdown

    카운트 다운
    kaunteu daun

    This countdown refers to New Year celebrants counting the seconds, usually backward, till midnight, when New Year starts - a great group activity that doesn’t scare animals, and involves a lot of joyful shouting when the clock strikes midnight!

    9- New Year’s Holiday

    연말 연시
    yeonmal yeonsi

    In many countries, New Year’s Day is a public holiday - to recuperate from the party the previous night, perhaps! Families also like to meet on this day to enjoy a meal and spend time together.

    10- Confetti

    색종이 조각
    saekjjongi jogak

    In most Western countries, confetti is traditionally associated with weddings, but often it is used as a party decoration. Some prefer to throw it in the air at the strike of midnight on New Year’s Eve.

    11- New Year’s Eve

    섣달 그믐
    Seotdal Geumeum

    This is the evening before New Year breaks at midnight! Often, friends and family meet for a party or meal the evening before, sometimes engaging in year-end rituals. How are you planning to give your New Year greetings in 2018?

    12- Toast

    건배
    geonbae

    A toast is a type of group-salutation that involves raising your glass to drink with others in honor of something or someone. A toast to the new year is definitely in order!

    13- Resolution

    새해소원
    saehaesowon

    Those goals or intentions you hope to, but seldom keep in the new year! Many people consider the start of a new year to be the opportune time for making changes or plans. Resolutions are those intentions to change, or the plans. It’s best to keep your resolutions realistic so as not to disappoint yourself!

    14- Parade

    퍼레이드
    peoreideu

    New Year celebrations are a huge deal in some countries! Parades are held in the streets, often to celebratory music, with colorful costumes and lots of dancing. Parades are like marches, only less formal and way more fun. At KoreanClass101, you can engage in forums with natives who can tell you what Korean New Year celebrations are like!

    3. Top 10 New Year’s Resolutions

    So, you learned the Korean word for ‘resolution’. Fabulous! Resolutions are those goals and intentions that we hope to manifest in the year that lies ahead. The beginning of a new year serves as a good marker in time to formalise these. Some like to do it in writing, others only hold these resolutions in their hearts. Here are our Top 10 New Year’s resolutions at KoreanClass101 - what are yours?

    Learn these phrases and impress your Korean friends with your vocabulary.

    New Year's Resolutions

    1- Read more

    다독하기
    dadokhagi

    Reading is a fantastic skill that everyone can benefit from. You’re a business person? Apparently, successful business men and women read up to 60 books a year. This probably excludes fiction, so better scan your library or Amazon for the top business reads if you plan to follow in the footsteps of the successful! Otherwise, why not make it your resolution to read more Korean in the new year? You will be surprised by how much this will improve your Korean language skills!

    2- Spend more time with family

    가족과 더욱 많은 시간 보내기
    gajokgwa deouk maneun sigan bonaegi

    Former US President George Bush’s wife, Barbara Bush, was quoted as having said this: “At the end of your life, you will never regret not having passed one more test, not winning one more verdict, or not closing one more deal. You will regret time not spent with a husband, a friend, a child, a parent.” This is very true! Relationships are often what gives life meaning, so this is a worthy resolution for any year.

    3- Lose weight

    체중감량하기
    chejunggamnyanghagi

    Hands up, how many of you made this new year’s resolution last year too…?! This is a notoriously difficult goal to keep, as it takes a lot of self discipline not to eat unhealthily. Good luck with this one, and avoid unhealthy fad diets!

    4- Save money

    소비절약하기
    sobijeoryakhagi

    Another common and difficult resolution! However, no one has ever been sorry when they saved towards reaching a goal. Make it your resolution to save money to upgrade your subscription to KoreanClass101’s Premium PLUS option in the new year - it will be money well spent!

    5- Quit smoking

    금연하기
    geumnyeonhagi

    This is a resolution that you should definitely keep, or your body could punish you severely later! Smoking is a harmful habit with many hazardous effects on your health. Do everything in your power to make this resolution come true in the new year, as your health is your most precious asset.

    6- Learn something new

    새로운 것 배우기 새로운 것 배우기
    saeroun geot baeugi

    Science has proven that learning new skills can help keep brain diseases such as dementia and Alzheimer’s at bay! It can even slow down the progression of the disease. So, keep your brain healthy by learning to speak a new language, studying towards a qualification, learning how to sew, or how to play chess - no matter how old you are, the possibilities are infinite!

    7- Drink less

    절주하기
    jeoljjuhagi

    This is another health resolution that is good to heed any time of the year. Excessive drinking is associated with many diseases, and its effect can be very detrimental to good relationships too. Alcohol is a poison and harmful for the body in large quantities!

    8- Exercise regularly

    규칙적으로 운동하기
    gyuchikjjeogeuro undonghagi

    This resolution goes hand-in-hand with ‘Lose weight’! An inactive body is an unhealthy and often overweight one, so give this resolution priority in the new year.

    9- Eat healthy

    건강한 식습관 가지기
    geonganghan siksseupkkwan gajigi

    If you stick with this resolution, you will lose weight and feel better in general. It is a very worthy goal to have!

    10- Study Korean with KoreanClass101

    KoreanClass101.com으로 한국어 공부하기
    KoreanClass101.comeuro hangugeo gongbuhagi

    Of course! You can only benefit from learning Korean, especially with us! Learning how to speak Korean can keep your brain healthy, it can widen your circle of friends, and improve your chances to land a dream job anywhere in the world. KoreanClass101 makes it easy and enjoyable for you to stick to this resolution.

    4. Inspirational New Year Quotes

    Inspirational Quotes

    Everyone knows that it is sometimes very hard to stick to resolutions, and not only over New Year. The reasons for this vary from person to person, but all of us need inspiration every now and then! A good way to remain motivated is to keep inspirational quotes near as reminders that it’s up to us to reach our goals.

    Click here for quotes that will also work well in a card for a special Korean new year greeting!

    Make decorative notes of these in Korean, and keep them close! Perhaps you could stick them above your bathroom mirror, or on your study’s wall. This way you not only get to read Korean incidentally, but also remain inspired to reach your goals! Imagine feeling like giving up on a goal, but reading this quote when you go to the bathroom: “It does not matter how slowly you go, as long as you do not stop.” What a positive affirmation!

    5. Inspirational Language Learning Quotes

    Language Learning Quotes

    Still undecided whether you should enroll with KoreanClass101 to learn a new language? There’s no time like the present to decide! Let the following Language Learning Quotes inspire you with their wisdom.

    Click here to read the most inspirational Language Learning Quotes!

    As legendary President Nelson Mandela once said: “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his own language, that goes to his heart.” So, learning how to say Happy New Year in Korean could well be a way into someone special’s heart for you! Let this year be the one where you to learn how to say Happy New Year, and much more, in Korean - it could open many and unexpected doors for you.

    6. How To Say Happy New Year in 31 Languages

    Here’s a lovely bonus for you! Why stop with Korean - learn how to say Happy New Year in 31 other languages too! Watch this video and learn how to pronounce these New Year’s wishes like a native in under two minutes.

    7. Why Enrolling with KoreanClass101 Would Be the Perfect New Year’s Gift to Yourself!

    If you are unsure how to celebrate the New Year, why not give yourself a huge gift, and enroll to learn Korean! With more than 12 years of experience behind us, we know that KoreanClass101 would be the perfect fit for you. There are so many reasons for this!

    Learning Paths

    • Custom-tailored Learning Paths: Start learning Korean at the level that you are. We have numerous Learning Pathways, and we tailor them just for you based on your goals and interests! What a boon!
    • Marked Progress and Fresh Learning Material Every Week: We make new lessons available every week, with an option to track your progress. Topics are culturally appropriate and useful, such as “Learning how to deliver negative answers politely to a business partner.” Our aim is to equip you with Korean that makes sense!
    • Multiple Learning Tools: Learn in fun, easy ways with resources such 1,000+ video and audio lessons, flashcards, detailed PDF downloads, and mobile apps suitable for multiple devices!
    • Fast Track Learning Option: If you’re serious about fast-tracking your learning, Premium Plus would be the perfect way to go! Enjoy perks such as personalised lessons with ongoing guidance from your own, native-speaking teacher, and one-on-one learning on your mobile app! You will not be alone in your learning. Weekly assignments with non-stop feedback, answers and corrections will ensure speedy progress.
    • Fun and Easy: Keeping the lessons fun and easy-to-learn is our aim, so you will stay motivated by your progress!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    There’s no reason not to go big in 2018 by learning Korean with KoreanClass101. Just imagine how the world can open up for you!

    How To Say ‘Thank you’ in Korean

    How to Say Thank You in Korean

    In most cultures, it is custom to express gratitude in some way or another. The dictionary defines gratitude as follows: it is “the quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness”. Giving a sincere, thankful response to someone’s actions or words is often the ‘glue’ that keeps relationships together. This is true in most societies! Doing so in a foreign country also shows your respect and appreciation for the culture. Words have great power - use these ones sincerely and often!

    Table of Contents

    1. 12 Ways to say ‘Thank you’ in Korean
    2. Video Lesson: Learn to Say ‘Thank You’ in 3 Minutes
    3. Infographic & Audio Lesson: Survival Phrases - Thank You
    4. Video Lesson: ‘Thank You’ in 31 Languages
    5. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You

    So, how do you say ‘Thank you’ in Korean? You can learn easily! Below, KoreanClass101 brings you perfect translations and pronunciation as you learn the most common ways Korean speakers say ‘Thanks’ in various situations.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    1. 12 Ways to say ‘Thank you’ in Korean

    1- Thank you.

    고마워요.
    Gomawoeyo.

    The magical words that can bring a smile to any face. For one day, truly mean it whenever you say these words, and see how this lifts your spirit too!

    2- That’s very kind of you.

    정말 친절하세요.
    Jeongmal chinjeolhaseyo.

    This phrase is appropriate when someone clearly goes out of their way to give good service, or to offer you a kindness.

    3- Thanks for your kind words!

    좋은 말씀 감사합니다!
    Joeun malsseum gamsahamnida.

    Someone paid you a compliment and made you feel good? That is kind of him/her, so express your gratitude!

    4- Thank you for coming today.

    오늘 와 주셔서 감사합니다.
    Oneul wa jusyeoseo gamsahamnida.

    This welcoming phrase should be part of your arsenal if you’re conducting more formal meetings with Korean speakers. If you’re hosting a party, this is also a good phrase when you greet your Korean guests!

    5- Thank you for your consideration.

    생각해 주셔서 감사합니다.
    Saenggakae jusyeoseo gamsahamnida.

    This is a more formal, almost solemn way to thank someone for their thoughtfulness and sensitivity towards you. It is also suitable to use when a native speaker has to consider something you submit, like a job application, a project or a proposal. You are thanking them, in essence, for time and effort they are about to, or have spent on your submission.

    6- Thanks a lot!

    정말 고마워요!
    Jeongmal gomawoyo!

    This means the same as ‘Thank you’, but with energy and enthusiasm added! It means almost the same as ‘thank you so much’ in Korean. Use this in an informal setting with your Korean friends or teachers.

    7- Teachers like you are not easy to find.

    선생님 같은 분은 찾기 힘들어요.
    Seonsaengnim gateun buneun chatgi himdeureoyo.

    Some phrases are compliments, which express gratitude by inference. This is one of them. If you’re particularly impressed with your KoreanClass101 teacher, this is an excellent phrase to memorize!

    8- Thank you for spending time with us.

    함께 해 주셔서 감사합니다.
    Hamkke hae jusyeoseo gamsahamnida.

    Any host at a gathering with Korean speakers, such as a meeting or a party, should have this under his/her belt! Use it when you’re saying goodbye or busy closing a meeting. It could also be another lovely way to thank your Korean language teacher for her time.

    9- Thank you for being patient and helping me improve.

    제가 나아질 수 있게 인내심을 갖고 도와주셔서 감사합니다.
    Jega naajil su itge innaesimeul gatgo dowajusyeoseo gamsahamnida.

    This phrase is another sure way to melt any formal or informal Korean teacher’s heart! Teaching is not easy, and often a lot of patience is required from the teacher. Thank him/her for it! It’s also a good phrase to use if you work in Korea, and want to thank your trainer or employer. You will go a long way towards making yourself a popular employee - gratitude is the most attractive trait in any person!

    10- You’re the best teacher ever!

    선생님이 최고예요!
    Seonsaengnimi choegoyeyo!

    This is also an enthusiastic way to thank your teacher by means of a compliment. It could just make their day!

    11- Thank you for the gift.

    선물 고마워요.
    Seonmul gomawoyo.

    This is a good phrase to remember when you’re the lucky recipient of a gift. Show your respect and gratitude with these words.

    12- I have learned so much thanks to you.

    선생님 덕분에 정말 많이 배웠어요.
    Seonsaengnim deokbune jeongmal mani baewosseoyo.

    What a wonderful compliment to give a good teacher! It means they have succeeded in their goal, and you’re thankful for it.

    2. Video Lesson: Learn to Say ‘Thank You’ in 3 Minutes

    In Korea, there are numerous ways to say “thank you.” The level of respect differs according to relationship.

    1- 감사합니다. (gamsahamnida)

    First, we’ll take a look at the phrase we use toward strangers and to those that we wish to respect. The first “thank you” is gamsahamnida (감사합니다). It’s respectful, commonly heard, quick, and easy. You will probably hear this form most frequently.

    2- 고맙습니다. (gomapseumnida)

    Next is gomapseumnida (고맙습니다). This is respectful and we can use it toward strangers as well. Koreans don’t use it quite as frequently as gamsahamnida, but it’s still very common. The two that we have covered so far are nearly identical in terms of respect. The first, gamsahamnida, is a tiny bit more respectful than gomapseumnida, but it’s only a very slight difference.

    3- 대단히 감사합니다. (daedanhi gamsahamnida)

    Koreans don’t use this next one every day; rather, they use it for special occasions when someone has really broken his or her back to do you a favor. This form offers the highest level of gratitude. This “thank you” is daedanhi gamsahamnida (대단히 감사합니다). Literally, this means “great thanks.”

    4- 고마워. (gomawo)

    Last is the informal “thank you,” which you should only use with close and intimate friends and family (an uncle you are meeting for the first time doesn’t cut it!). This informal form is gomawo (고마워). There are a few relationships with which the informal language is acceptable to use. For more on that, check out Quick Tip 1.

    It is important to be as polite and respectful as possible. So if you’re ever in doubt, use the formal “thank you,” gamsahamnida or gomapseumnida (감사합니다 or 고맙습니다).

    Cultural Insights

    Quick Tip #1: Helpful Hints About Formality

    In Korean, there are numerous ways to say “thank you.” We can categorize anything said in Korean into two broad categories: formal and informal. As Korea is a Confucian society based on hierarchy, people will either be above your level, at your level, or below your level. And this is how we decide which form of “thank you” to use.

    For example, if you are meeting someone for the first time, you must use formal language as you would want to be as respectful possible. You should also use the formal form toward your teacher, your boss, your coworker, and those older than you (for more on age, check out Quick Tip 2).

    You should only use the informal gomawo (고마워) with those you are sure you will not offend by being informal with them. You should use it with people you have known for a while and are comfortable with. Here are some examples of relationships where it is proper for you to use the informal form:

    • A cousin that you grew up with and know very well
    • Little children
    • Classmates (sometimes)
    • A best friend

    For most other relationships, it’s important to use formal phrases. If you are ever unsure, stick with the formal. The formal thank you is gamsahamnida (감사합니다) or gomapseumnida (고맙습니다).

    Quick Tip 2: Respecting Your Elders in Korea

    In Korea, age plays an extremely important role in relationship dynamics. If someone is older than you (even if only by a few years), it is sometimes acceptable for the older person to use informal language toward you. But sometimes you are still expected to use formal language toward them. As age plays a very significant role in Korea, it dramatically affects how we use the Korean language.

    On the run to Korea? Wait! You can’t go without some basic language phrases under your belt! Especially if you’re heading to meet your prospective employer! Either in person or online, knowing how to say ‘Thank you’ in the Korean language will only improve their impression of you! KoreanClass101 saves you time with this short lesson that nevertheless packs a punch. Learn to say ‘Thank you’ in Korean in no time!

    3. Audio Lesson: Survival Phrases - Thank You

    5 Ways to Say Thank You in Korean

    Perhaps you think it’s unimportant that you don’t know what ‘Thank you’ is in Korean, or that it’s too difficult a language to learn. Yet, as a traveler or visitor, you will be surprised at how far you can go using a little bit of Korean in Korea!

    Click Here to Listen to the Free Audio Lesson!

    At KoreanClass101, we offer you a few ways of saying ‘Thank you’ in Korean that you have no excuse not knowing, as they’re so simple and easy to learn. The lesson is geared to aid your ‘survival’ in formal and informal situations in Korea, so don’t wait! You will never have to google ‘How do you say thanks in Korean’ again…!

    4. ‘Thank You’ in 31 Languages

    For the global traveler in a hurry, here are 31 ways to say ‘Thank you’! These are the first words you need to learn in any foreign language - it is sure to smooth your way with native speakers by showing your gratitude for services rendered, and your respect for their culture! Learn and know how to correctly say ‘Thank you’ in 31 different languages in this short video.

    5. Why would KoreanClass101 be the perfect choice to learn Korean?

    However, you need not stop at ‘Thank you’ in Korean - why not learn to speak the language?! You have absolutely nothing to lose. Research has shown that learning a new language increases intelligence and combats brain-aging. Also, the ability to communicate with native speakers in their own language is an instant way to make friends and win respect! Or imagine you know how to write ‘Thank you’ to that special Korean friend after a date…he/she will be so impressed!

    Thank You

    KoreanClass101 Has Special Lessons, Tools and Resources to Teach You How to Say Thank You and Other Key Phrases

    With more than a decade of experience behind us, we have taught thousands of satisfied users to speak foreign languages. How do we do this? First, we take the pain out of learning! At KoreanClass101, students are assisted as they master vocabulary, pronunciation, and conversation through state-of-the-art and fun online learning methods. A library replete with learning resources allows for you to learn at your own pace and in your own space! Resources include thousands of video and audio recordings, downloadable PDF lessons and plenty of learning apps for your mobile devices. Each month, we add benefits with FREE bonuses and gifts to improve your experience.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    We accommodate all levels and types of learners, from Absolute Beginner to Advanced, and KoreanClass101 is free for anyone to sign up. However, you can choose to fast track your fluency with lesson customization and increased interactive learning and practicing. Upgrade to Premium, or Premium PLUS to enhance your experience and greatly expedite your learning. With this type of assistance, and pleasurable effort on your part, you will speak Korean in a very short period of time!

    Click Here to Visit KoreanClass101!

    Best of all is that you’re never alone! We believe that practice is the holy grail of learning any new language, and we gear our courses to ensure lots of it. Enroll with us, and you gain immediate access to our lively forum where we meet and greet, and discuss your burning questions. Our certified teachers are friendly and helpful, and you are very likely to practice your first ‘Thanks!’ in Korean on him/her, AND mean it! Hurry up, and sign up now - you will thank us for it.

    How to Learn Korean Through Fairy Tale Stories

    Top 6 Korean Fairy Tale Stories and Characters

    Hi Listeners,

    Do you know what the top 6 Korean fairy tales are?

    Reading short stories in Korean is a fun way to learn the Korean language and culture. Check out the 6 Korean fairy tale stories below and learn must-know folk story words and phrases in Korean!

    1. Top 6 Korean Fairy Tales

    Top 6 Korean Fairy Tales

    1. Heungbu and Nolbu

    The Korean title is 흥부와 놀부 (Heungbuwa nolbu). Heungbu and Nolbu are two brothers, with opposite personalities. Their vicissitudes show how caring about the others brings wealth and, most of all, happiness.

    2. A Filial Daughter, Sim Chong

    The Korean title is 효녀 심청 (Hyonyeo simcheong). Sim Chong sells herself to restore her father’s sight. During a storm, the sailors sacrifice her and instead of dying, she becomes the sea queen.

    3. The Rabbit’s Liver

    The Korean title is 토끼의 간 (Gyeonuwa jingnyeo). The Dragon King must eat a rabbit’s liver to recover from an illness. The rabbit tells him that he didn’t bring his liver and escape.

    4. Gyeonu and Jiknyeo

    The Korean title is 견우와 직녀 (Gyeonu and Jiknyeo). Two lovers marry but then begin to neglect their duties. Angry, the heavenly king only allows them to meet once a year on a bridge of magpies.

    5. The Fairy and the Woodcutter

    The Korean title is 선녀와 나무꾼 (Seonnyeowa namukkun). A man steals the robe of a fairy and is told not to return it until she has three children. He returns it and she leaves with his two children.

    6. The Gold Ax and the Silver Ax

    The Korean title is 금 도끼와 은 도끼 (Gum dokkiwa eun dokki). A woodcutter loses his axe. A wizard appears and gives him a choice of an iron, gold, and silver axe. The woodcutter takes his own axe and is rewarded.

    2. Fairy Tale Characters and Words in Korean

    Here are some common fairy tale characters and words in Korean you may come across while reading Korean folktale stories.

    Korean Romanization Meaning
    요정 yojeong fairy
    유니콘 unicon unicorn
    seong castle
    마법 mabeop magic
    마녀 manyeo witch
    주문 jumun spell
    yong dragon
    도깨비 dokkaebi Ogre
    wang king
    왕자 wangja prince
    공주 gongju princess
    옛날 옛적에 yennal yeotjeoge once upon a time
    마법사 mabeopsa wizard
    인어 ineo mermaid
    거인 geo-in giant
    난쟁이 nanjaengi dwarf
    계모 gyemo stepmother
    여왕 yeowang queen

    Check out even more fairy tale words in the video below!

    Conclusion

    You might not understand every single word in Korean stories at first but try to guess what they mean in context. Illustrations will also help you understand the story. After reading it, make sure to look up the words in the dictionary and read the story a few more times. If you do that, you’ll surely get better at reading Korean.

    So what Korean tale would you like to read first? Do you know any other fairy tale stories in Korea? Did we miss any Korean fairy tale words? Let us know in the comments!

    Do you know what “wallet” is in Korean?

    Learn Korean words about things that you can find in your wallet!

    지갑 (jigap): wallet

    Here are some words picked by Jae:

    1. 주민등록증 (identification card)
    2. 운전면허증 (driver’s license)
    3. 현금 (cash)

    Do you know what to say when you’ve lost your wallet?
    Click here to learn more!

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    How do you translate ‘eat’ into Korean?

    Hi Hyunwoo here. I hope everybody is having a wonderful day and enjoying your Korean studies. Some might think there’s enough variety to the list of categories on this blog already, but I’ve just added one more category to it. And as you can see, it’s about how to translate certain words or phrases between English and Korean - sometimes from English to Korean, and other times, the other way around.

    I’d like to start with a very basic word describing a very important behavior, which, however, is not translated very correctly all the time.

    eat.jpg

    It’s  ‘to eat.’

    What’s the Korean word for it? It’s very easy. 먹다.

    But the thing is, when you use it in a sentence, you always need an object noun. So for example, if you want to say “I’m eating pizza.” you can say 피자 먹고 있어요. (I’ll write all the Korean sentences in the standard polite level) and if you want to say “I’m eating lunch.” you can say 점심 먹고 있어요.

    But what if you want to say,

    “I’m eating.”

    or

    “Don’t talk while you’re eating.”

    or

    “I eat slowly.”

    how would you translate these sentences into Korean?

    Most people would go,

    저는 먹고 있어요.

    먹을 때 이야기하지 마세요.

    저는 천천히 먹어요.

    While these sentences above are all correct grammatically, they are all missing something. When Korean people use the verb 먹다, they always like to add a noun - an object.  So it’s always “something + 을/를” 먹다. So the sentences above would become more natural by changing them to:

    저는 밥(을) 먹고 있어요.

    밥  먹을 때 이야기하지 마세요. or 음식 먹을 때 이야기 하지 마세요.

    저는 밥을 천천히 먹어요. or 저는 음식을 천천히 먹어요.

    So please remember not to use the verb ‘to eat’ on its own in a sentence in most cases, and add 음식, 밥, 점심, 저녁, 아침 or any other noun for food when you use the verb 먹다. And when you want to ask your friend “Have you eaten?” don’t ask “먹었어?” but please ask “밥 먹었어?”

    Thanks for reading!