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Archive for the 'Explore Korea' Category

Essential Korean Language for Travel that You Must Know

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Are you planning to travel to Korea? Korean travel phrases in language-learning are absolutely essential for just this reason!

Learning basic South Korean travel phrases will definitely help you in nearly any situation, including urgent ones. The Korean travel phrases and Korean travel words you’ll learn in this article will make your travels more fun and help you connect with locals, so that you can get the most out of your upcoming trip to South Korea!

Table of Contents

  1. Essential Korean Travel Phrases: Basic Expressions
  2. Essential Korean Phrases: Transportation
  3. Essential Korean Phrases: Shopping
  4. Essential Korean Phrases: At Restaurants
  5. Essential Korean Phrases: Asking for and Giving Directions
  6. Essential Korean Phrases: Emergencies
  7. Essential Korean Phrases: Flattery Phrases
  8. Essential Korean Phrases: Useful Phrases to Go Through Language Problems
  9. Essential Korean Phrases: Buying Tickets at a Museum
  10. Essential Korean Phrases: Taking Pictures
  11. How KoreanClass101.com Can Help You with Korean

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1. Essential Korean Travel Phrases: Basic Expressions

Preparing For Travel

You’ll be able to converse with local native Koreans by simply remembering these basic phrases. Koreans will appreciate the fact that you made the effort to speak to them in their local language, and it will certainly add more fun to your South Korea trip.

1- 안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo) - “hello” (polite form)

This is one of the most basic and commonly used Korean phrases for travelling, so be sure to keep it in your arsenal!

Example 1:
You enter a restaurant and a waitress greets you.

  • Waitress: 안녕하세요.
    Waitress: Annyeonghaseyo.
    Waitress: “Hello.”
  • You: 안녕하세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo.
    You: “Hello.”

Example 2:
You take a taxi and want to greet the taxi driver.

  • You: 안녕하세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo.
    You: “Hello.”
  • Taxi driver: 네, 안녕하세요. 어디로 가시나요?
    Taxi driver: Ne, annyeonghaseyo. Eodiro gasinayo?
    Taxi driver: “Yes, hello. Where would you like to go?”

2 - 반갑습니다 (bangapseumnida) - “nice to meet you” (polite form)

Example 1:
Jason went to your friend’s house and met their roommate, who is older than him, for the first time.

  • Roommate: 어? 친구 데려왔어? 누구야?
    Roommate: Eo? Chingu deryeowasseo? Nuguya?
    Roommate: “Oh, you brought your friend home? Who is he?”
  • Jason: 안녕하세요, 반갑습니다.
    Jason: Annyeonghaseyo, bangapseumnida.
    Jason: “Hello, nice to meet you.”

Example 2:
Michael went to a language exchange event in Hongdae and wants to introduce himself to others.

  • Michael: 안녕하세요, 저는 마이클이라고 합니다. 반갑습니다.
    Michael: Annyeonghaseyo, jeoneun maikeurirago hamnida. Bangapseumnida.
    Michael: “Hello, my name is Michael. Nice to meet you.”

3 - 감사합니다 (gamsahamnida) - “thank you” (polite form)

Example 1:
You’re walking in the busy streets in the Gangnam area, and see a lady drop her wallet. You pick it up and give it to her.

  • You: 여기, 지갑 떨어뜨리셨어요.
    You: Yeogi, jigap tteoreotteurisyeosseoyo.
    You: “Here, you dropped your wallet.”
  • Lady: 어머, 감사합니다.
    Lady: Eomeo, gamsahamnida.
    Lady: “Oh, thank you so much.”

Example 2:
You order a cup of coffee at The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf and a clerk gives you the change after you’ve paid.

  • Clerk: 500원 거스름돈 드리겠습니다.
    Clerk: Obaegwon geoseureumdon deurigetseumnida.
    Clerk: “Here is [your] change, 500 won.”
  • You: 감사합니다.
    You: Gamsahamnida.
    You: “Thank you.”

4 - 실례합니다 (sillyehamnida) - “excuse me” (polite form)

This is one of the most useful Korean travel phrases you can learn, so keep it in mind.

Example 1:
You’re on a crowded subway and need to get closer to the exit.

  • You: 실례합니다. 지나가겠습니다.
    You: Sillyehamnida. Jinagagetseumnida.
    You: “Excuse me. Passing through.”

Example 2:
You accidentally stepped on a stranger’s foot inside the busy subway.

  • You: 실례합니다.
    You: Sillyehamnida.
    You: “Excuse me.”

5- 네; 아니요; 괜찮아요. (ne; aniyo; gwaenchanayo.) - “yes; no; no, thank you.”

While you learn Korean travel phrases, never underestimate the importance of even the smallest words. They can have the most impact!

Example 1:

  • You: 이쪽으로 가면 화장실인가요?
    You: Ijjogeuro gamyeon hwajangsiringayo?
    You: “Is this way to the toilet?”
  • Clerk: 아니요, 그쪽은 창고예요.
    Clerk: Aniyo, geujjogeun changgoyeyo.
    Clerk: “No, that’s the storage section.”
  • You: 아, 그럼 저쪽으로 가면 되나요?
    You: A, geureom jeojjogeuro gamyeon doenayo?
    You: “Ah, so should I go that way?”
  • Clerk: 네, 맞아요.
    Clerk: Ne, majayo.
    Clerk: “Yes, correct.”

Example 2:
You had a great time hanging out with your friend. But it’s getting late—time to go home.

  • Friend: 많이 어두워졌네, 집에 데려다 줄까?
    Friend: Mani eoduwojyeonne, jibe deryeoda julkka?
    Friend: “It became really dark. Did you want me to take you to your home?”
  • You: 아니, 괜찮아. 혼자갈 수 있어.
    You: Ani, gwaenchana. Honjagal su isseo.
    You: “No, I’m fine. I can go home by myself.”

We have more free lessons like “Top 10 Conversational Phrases,” so do check out this page when you have time.


2. Essential Korean Phrases: Transportation

Airplane Phrases

Traveling by public transportation is the most efficient way to get around South Korea. The fares for the subway and public buses are very cheap, and the routes are easy to understand. There are also announcements offered in various languages, so the chance of getting lost is slim.

However, you need to remember that most of the staff at the ticket booths don’t speak English. Let’s learn the most important and useful phrases for buying tickets and conversing with any staff that you encounter.

1- ~으로 가는 티켓 주세요. (~euro ganeun tiket juseyo.)

~으로 가는 티켓 주세요. (~euro ganeun tiket juseyo.) means “Please give me a ticket to ~.” Use this phrase to buy any tickets to go out of the city area.

Example 1:
You’re at Dong-Daegu train station (동대구역; dongdaeguyeok) to buy a train ticket to Busan.

  • You: 부산으로 가는 티켓 주세요.
    You: Busaneuro ganeun tiket juseyo
    You: “I would like to buy a ticket to go to Busan.”
  • Staff: 출발시간은 언제가 괜찮으십니까?
    Staff: Chulbalsiganeun eonjega gwaenchaneusimnikka?
    Staff: “When would you like to depart?”
  • You: 오후 1시쯤 출발하는 기차 있을까요?
    You: Ohu 1sijjeum chulbalhaneun gicha isseulkkayo?
    You: “Are there any trains that depart at 13:00 (one o’clock PM)?”

Example 2:
You’re at the Seoul Express Bus Terminal to buy a bus ticket to Pohang (포항; pohang).

  • You: 안녕하세요, 오후 1시 포항으로 가는 티켓 주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, ohu 1si pohangeuro ganeun tiket juseyo.
    You: “Hello, I would like to buy a ticket to go to Pohang at 13:00 (one o’clock PM).”
  • Staff: 네, 몇장 드리면 될까요?
    Staff: Ne, myeotjang deurimyeon doelkkayo?
    Staff: “Okay, how many tickets do you need?”
  • You: 한장이요.
    You: Hanjangiyo.
    You: “Just one.”

2- ~으로 가는 전철/버스 인가요? (~euro ganeun jeoncheol/beoseu ingayo?)

This phrase means “Does this subway/bus go to ~?”

It’s likely that you’ll take a bus or subway to get around in South Korea. This travel phrase will come in handy when you want to ask a question to locals. When you travel by boat or ferry, simply replace the noun with “boat” (배; bae).

Example 1:
You’re at the Incheon airport and need to go to the Jamsil area. A bus stops in front of you, and you want to ask whether this bus goes to Jamsil.

  • You: 잠실로 가는 버스인가요?
    You: Jamsillo ganeun beoseuingayo?
    You: “Does this bus go to Jamsil?”
  • Staff: 네, 갑니다.
    Staff: Ne, gamnida.
    Staff: “Yes, it does.”

Example 2:
You’re at Gukje market in Busan and you need to catch the subway to go to Gimhae International airport.

  • You: 실례합니다. 이 전철은 부산 공항으로 가는 전철인가요?
    You: Sillyehamnida. i jeoncheoreun busan gonghangeuro ganeun jeoncheoringayo?
    You: “Excuse me. Does this subway go to the Busan airport?”
  • Stranger: 아니요, 부산 공항으로 가는 전철은 저쪽이예요.
    Stranger: Aniyo, busan gonghangeuro ganeun jeoncheoreun jeojjogiyeyo.
    Stranger: “No, the subway bound for the Busan airport is over there.”
  • You: 감사합니다.
    You: Gamsahamnida.
    You: “Thank you.”

3- ~으로 가주세요. (~euro gajuseyo.)

This phrase means “Please take me to ~.”

This travel phrase is the most effective and simple phrase to tell your taxi driver. Simply add the destination that you want to reach, such as “Insadong” (인사동; insadong) or “Dongdaemun” (동대문; dongdaemun) etc., followed by 으로 가주세요. (~euro gajuseyo.). That’s it. You don’t need to say anything else!

However, if you want to go somewhere less touristy, and it requires you to explain where exactly you want to go, give the taxi driver the address. Every taxi has a navigation system installed. Also, taxi companies provide free interpreter services in South Korea.

To know whether the taxi you got in offers this service, take a look on the right-hand side of the door. Usually, there’s a large rectangular sign that explains about this service in English, Japanese, and Chinese. So if you’re struggling to explain where you want to go, simply say “free interpreter” to the taxi driver.

Example 1:
You’re at “Gangnam station” (강남역; gangnamyeok) right now and want to move to “Itaewon” (이태원; itaewon) to have dinner with your friends.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 이태원역으로 가주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, itaewonyeogeuro gajuseyo.
    You: “Hello, please take me to Itaewon station.”
  • Taxi driver: 네, 알겠습니다.
    Taxi driver: Ne, algetseumnida.
    Taxi driver: “Sure.”

Example 2:
You want to visit your friend’s house in Busan, and you have his address.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 이곳으로 가고 싶은데요.. (주소를 보여줌)
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, igoseuro gago sipeundeyo.. (jusoreul boyeojum)
    You: “Hello, I would like to go to this place…” (show him the address)
  • Taxi driver: 잠시만요. (네비게이션으로 주소 확인함)
    Taxi driver: Jamsimanyo. (nebigeisyeoneuro juso hwaginham)
    Taxi driver: “Please hold on…” (checks the location via navigation system)


3. Essential Korean Phrases: Shopping

Basic Questions

1 - 이거/저것 얼마예요? (igeo/jeogeot eolmayeyo?)

This phrase means “How much is this/that?”

Use this travel phrase when you want to ask the seller how much the items cost while shopping in South Korea. To get the seller’s attention, you can say 저기요 (jeogiyo) which means “excuse me.” If the seller is male, you can call him by 아저씨 (ajeossi) meaning “mature man,” and if the seller is female, you can call her by 아줌마 (ajumma) meaning “matured female” or 이모 (imo) meaning “aunt.”

Also, remember that 이것 (igeot) means “this” and 저것 (jeogeot) means “that.” If you want each of them to be plural, say 이것들 (igeotdeul) meaning “these” and 저것들 (jeogeotdeul) meaning “those.”

Example 1:
You’re shopping at a famous market called “Gwangjang market” (광장시장; Gwangjangsijang), in Seoul. You found a set of Korean traditional clothing called “Hanbok” (한복; hanbok) which you want to buy, and you’re curious to know how much it costs.

  • You: 아저씨, 이거 얼마에요?
    You: Ajeossi, igeo eolmaeyo?
    You: “Excuse me sir, how much is this?”
  • Seller: 7만원이에요.
    Seller: Chilmanwonieyo.
    Seller: “It’s 70,000 won.”

Example 2:
You found a pink sweater that you like while shopping at 서문시장 (seomun sijang) in Daegu. You want to ask how much the sweater costs.

  • You: 저기요, 저건 얼마예요?
    You: jeogiyo, jeogeon eolmayeyo?
    You: “Excuse me, how much is that?”
  • Seller: 2만9천원이예요.
    Seller: Imangucheonwoniyeyo.
    Seller: “It’s 29,000 won.”
  • You: (저거) 한개 주세요.
    You: (jeogeo) Hangae juseyo.
    You: “Please give me one (of that).”

2 - 이거 #개 주세요. (igeo #gae juseyo.)

This phrase means “Please give me [number] [of the product].”

Example 1:
You’re at the supermarket and the clerk wants to ask how many plastic bags you want.

  • Seller: 비닐봉지 몇개 드릴까요?
    Seller: Binilbongji myeotgae deurilkkayo?
    Seller: “How many plastic bags would you like to have?”
  • You: 2개 주세요.
    You: Dugae juseyo.
    You: “Two please.”

Example 2:
You found a beautiful “Korean traditional pocket” called 전통 주머니 (jeontong jumeoni) and want to buy six of them.

  • You: 이거 6개 주세요.
    You: Igeo yeoseotgae juseyo.
    You: “Please give me six (of the Korean traditional pockets).”
  • Seller: 네.
    Seller: Ne.
    Seller: “Ok.”

On our website, KoreanClass101, you can find many lessons on counting numbers in Korean. Feel free to check out our website whenever you want.

3- 조금만 깎아 주시면 안될까요? (Jogeumman kkakka jusimyeon andoelkkayo?)

This phrase means “Can you please reduce the price?”

The prices in Korea are usually fixed, but you can definitely negotiate the price at a market. To ask for a discount, use this phrase!

If you want to buy items for a cheaper price in Korea, try to pay by cash. If you pay with a credit card, you’ll be charged extra (approximately ten percent more).

Example 1:
You’re at 남대문시장 (Namdaemun sijang) meaning “Namdaemun market” in Seoul and found a nice jacket. You ask for the price and think that it costs too much. You want to negotiate the price.

  • You: 너무 이쁘긴한데… 비싸네요. 조금만 깎아 주시면 안될까요?
    You: Neomu ippeuginhande… bissaneyo. Jogeumman kkakka jusimyeon andoelkkayo?
    You: “It’s really pretty…but it’s expensive. Can you please reduce the price a bit?”
  • Seller: 그럼 3,000원만 깎아 줄게요.
    Seller: Geureom samcheonwonman kkakka julgeyo.
    Seller: “I will give you a discount of 3,000 won then.”

Example 2:
You’re at 고속터미널 역 지하상가 (gosokteomineol yeok jihasangga) an underground shopping mall in the Express Bus Terminal station in Seoul, and want to buy a pair of jeans. The sign says that it costs 10,000 won if you pay by cash. But you only have a credit card.

  • You: 이거 카드로 계산할게요.
    You: Igeo kadeuro gyesanhalgeyo.
    You: “I will pay by credit card.”
  • Seller: 카드로 계산하면 11,000원이에요. 현금으로 내는게 더 저렴해요.
    Seller: kadeuro gyesanhamyeon mancheonwonieyo. hyeongeumeuro naeneun ge deo jeoryeomhaeyo.
    Seller: “If you pay by card, it will be 11,000 won. It will be cheaper by cash.”
  • You: 아 그래요? 이곳에 가장 가까운 ATM기계는 어디에 있나요?
    You: Igose gajang gakkaun ATMgigyeneun eodie innayo?
    You: “Oh really? Where is the nearest ATM from here?”

4- S/M/L 사이즈 있나요? (S/M/L saijeu innayo?)

This phrase means “Do you have S/M/L size for this?”

When you ask for a different size, if a seller says it’s 프리사이즈 (peurisaijeu), this means that it’s “free-size.” Do be careful when you buy free-size clothing, as it may be too big or small when you try it on. Also, for many shops at a market or an underground shopping area, you can’t refund the items after purchase.

Example 1:
You’re at an underground shopping mall in Gangnam station. You find a sweater and there’s no size written on the tag.

  • You: 이건 사이즈가 어떻게 돼요?
    You: Igeon saijeuga eotteoke dwaeyo?
    You: “What size is this?”
  • Seller: 그거 프리사이즈에요.
    Seller: Geugeo peurisaijeueyo.
    Seller: “It’s a free-size sweater.”

Example 2:
You want to ask if the dress you chose comes in different sizes.

  • You: 이 드레스 M 사이즈도 있나요?
    You: I deureseu em saijeudo innayo?
    You: “Do you have an M size?”
  • Seller: 네, 잠시만요.
    Seller: Ne, jamsimanyo.
    Seller: “Yes, hold on a sec.”

5- 뭐가 제일 인기 많아요? (mwoga jeil ingi manayo?)

This phrase means “What are the most popular ones?”

Sometimes it can be overwhelming when you need to choose something out of so many goods. If you’re not sure which one to choose, it’s always safe to ask a seller which item is popular these days.

Example 1:
You bought a number of items at a shop and a seller wants to give you some freebies.

  • You: 너무 이쁜것들이 많아서 못 고르겠어요. 어떤 것이 제일 인기가 많아요?
    You: Neomu ippeungeotdeuri manaseo mot goreugesseoyo. eotteon geosi jeil ingiga manayo?
    You: “There are so many things that I can’t choose. What is the most popular one from here?”
  • Seller: 요즘은 이 아이템이 한국에서 인기가 많아요.
    Seller: Yojeumeun i aitemi hangugeseo ingiga manayo.
    Seller: “These days, this item is quite popular in Korea.”

Example 2:
You want to buy a dress that’s trending in Korea.

  • You: 어느 드레스가 제일 인기 많아요?
    You: Eoneu deureseuga jeil ingi manayo?
    You: “Which dress is the most popular dress in Korea?”
  • Seller: 이거요.
    Seller: Igeoyo.
    Seller: “This one.”

Do you want more phrases for shopping? Check out “15 Shopping Phrases. Exchanges, Refunds and Complaints!” on KoreanClass101.com.

Korean Dishes In Silver Plates


4. Essential Korean Phrases: At Restaurants

1- ~주세요 (~Juseyo)

This phrase means “Please give me ~,” and it can be used not only to order dishes, but also to buy things like tickets or clothing.

Example 1:
You enter a restaurant and want to ask for a menu.

  • You: 저기요, 메뉴주세요.
    You: Jeogiyo, menyujuseyo.
    You: “Excuse me, please give me a menu.”
  • Waitress: 네, 여기있습니다.
    Waitress: Ne, yeogiitseumnida.
    Waitress: “Sure, here you go.”

Example 2:
You want to order a bottle of beer and soju to try to make 소맥 (somaek) which is a whiskey and beer cocktail.

  • You: 저기요, 맥주 한병이랑 소주 한병 주세요.
    You: Jeogiyo, maekju hanbyeongirang soju hanbyeong juseyo.
    You: “Excuse me, can I please have a bottle of beer and soju?”
  • Waitress:네, 여기있습니다.
    Waitress: Ne, yeogiitseumnida.
    Waitress: “Sure, here you go.”

2- 많이 매운가요? (Mani maeungayo?)

This phrase means “Is this spicy?”

Many Korean dishes are spicy for foreigners because we use 고추장 (Gochujang) meaning “red chili paste” or 고춧가루 (gochutgaru) meaning “chili powder” in most dishes. When ordering spicy dishes in Korea, you can request to make it less spicy, so you can still enjoy Korean dishes!

Example 1:
You’re at one of the famous ddeokbokki restaurants named 죠스떡볶이 (jyoseutteokbokki). It’s your first time trying some ddeokbokki.

  • You: 떡볶이 주세요.
    You: Tteokbokki juseyo.
    You: “I will have ddeokbokki please.”
  • Waitress: 매운 거 잘 못 드시면 많이 매우실 텐데요.
    Waitress: Maeun geo jal mot deusimyeon mani maeusil tendeyo.
    Waitress: “If you struggle a lot to eat spicy foods, you may not be able to eat this dish.”
  • You: 아, 많이 매운가요? 그럼 덜 맵게 해주시겠어요?
    You: A, mani maeungayo? geureom deol maepge haejusigesseoyo?
    You: “Ah, is it really that spicy? Is it possible to make it less spicy?”

Example 2:
You want to ask whether the dish you want to order is spicy or not.

  • You: 이거 많이 매운가요?
    You: Igeo mani maeungayo?
    You: “Is this spicy?”
  • Waiter: 아니요, 맵지 않습니다.
    Waiter: Aniyo, maepji anseumnida.
    Waiter: “No, it’s not spicy.”

3- 저는 채식주의자예요. (Jeoneun chaesikjuuijayeyo)

This important phrase means “I am a vegetarian.”

“Vegetarian” is 채식주의자 (chaesikjuuija) and “vegan” is 비건 (bigeon) in Korean. Although the number of vegetarian restaurants is increasing, this concept (especially veganism) is fairly new to South Korea. Therefore, do research in advance if you’re after specific vegetarian/vegan restaurants in Korea.

Otherwise, vegetarian dishes are easy to find, so don’t worry too much. Classic dishes include 야채 김밥 (vegetable gimbap) and 잡채 (japchae).

Example 1:
You’re at a gimbap restaurant and want to order a vegetarian gimbap.

  • You: 저는 채식주의자예요. 어떤 김밥을 먹으면 될까요?
    You: Jeoneun chaesikjuuijayeyo. eotteon gimbabeul meogeumyeon doelkkayo?
    You: “I am vegetarian. Is there any gimbap for me to eat?”
  • Staff: 채식주의자세요? 그럼 야채 김밥 드셔야겠네요.
    Staff: Chaesikjuuijaseyo? geureom yachae gimbap deusyeoyagenneyo.
    Staff: “Are you vegetarian? Then you should order the vegetable gimbap.”

Example 2:
You went to a restaurant with your friend, who doesn’t know that you’re vegetarian. He wants to order 삼겹살 (samgyeopsal) or “pork belly.”

  • Friend: 우리 삼겹살 시켜먹을까?
    Friend: Uri samgyeopsal sikyeomeogeulkka?
    Friend: “Shall we order some pork belly?”
  • You: 미안, 나 채식주의자야. 그래서 고기 못 먹어
    You: Mian, na chaesikjuuijaya. Geuraeseo gogi monmeogeo
    You: “Sorry, I’m vegetarian, so I can’t eat meat.”
  • Friend: 아 진짜? 몰랐네. 미안, 그럼 다른거 시켜먹자.
    Friend: A jinjja? mollanne. Mian, geureom dareungeo sikyeomeokja.
    Friend: “Oh really? I did not know. Sorry, let’s order something else.”

4- ~ 알러지있어요 (alleojiisseoyo) - “I am allergic to ~.”

This phrase means “I am allergic to ~,” and may be the most important restaurant phrase you learn today!

Are you allergic to peanuts? “Peanut” is called 땅콩 (ttangkong) in Korean. “Wheat” is called 밀 (mil).

To say that you’re allergic to something, just say the name of the food that you’re allergic to, followed by 알러지있어요 (alleojiisseoyo).

Example 1:
You’re allergic to peanuts and you want to ask if the snack you want to buy contains some nuts.

  • You: 제가 땅콩 알레르기가 있는데요, 이 과자 땅콩이 들어가 있나요?
    You: Jega ttangkong allereugiga inneundeyo, I gwaja ttangkongi deureoga innayo?
    You: “I am allergic to peanuts, I am wondering if this snack contains some peanuts?”
  • Staff: 확인해볼께요. 네, 들어가 있네요.
    Staff: Hwaginhaebolkkeyo. Ne, deureoga inneyo.
    Staff: “Let me have a check. Yes, it does.”

Example 2:
You’re currently staying with a Korean homestay family. The homestay father gave you chocolates and you want to say that you’re allergic to them.

  • You: 전 초콜릿에 알레르기가 있어서 먹을 때마다 기침을 해요.
    You: Jeon chokollise allereugiga isseoseo meogeul ttaemada gichimeul haeyo.
    You: “I am allergic to chocolates, so every time I eat I sneeze.”
  • Father: 그런데도 먹어?
    Father: Geureondedo meogeo?
    Father: “And you still eat chocolates?”
  • You: 네, 너무 맛이 있어서요.
    You: Ne, neomu masi isseoseoyo.
    You: “Yes, because it‘s too delicious. “

5- 와이파이 비밀번호는 뭐예요? (Waipai bimilbeonhoneun mwoyeyo?)

This phrase translates to “What is the password for Wifi?”

You’ll be startled at the speed of Internet services in South Korea. Moreover, free wifi services are available nearly everywhere—on the subway, KTX, at restaurants and cafes, etc. Most restaurants and cafes provide free wifi for customers, so ask for the password to access the free wifi.

Example 1:
You stopped by 엔제리너스커피 (Angel-in-Us Coffee) to take a break from a long walk, and you want to use free wifi.

  • You: 와이파이 비밀번호는 뭐예요?
    You: Waipai bimilbeonhoneun mwoyeyo?
    You: “What is the password for wifi?”
  • Waiter: 1234567890입니다.
    Waiter: I-ri-sam-sa-o-yuk-chil-pal-gu-yeong-imnida.
    Waiter: “It’s 1234567890.”
  • You: 감사합니다.
    You: Gamsahamnida.
    You: “Thank you.”

Do you want to learn more practical phrases to use at Korean restaurants? Check out “Vocabulary and Phrases for the Restaurant” on our website.

Navigating Through the Streets


5. Essential Korean Phrases: Asking for and Giving Directions

Survival Phrases

1- ___은 어떻게 가나요? (___eun eotteoke ganayo?)

This phrase translates as “How do I go to ~?” in English.

This is the phrase to use when you’re asking for detailed directions. Use this phrase to ask how to get somewhere, when there are many steps involved.

Example 1:
You’re asking your homestay father how to get to Busan from Daegu.

  • You: 부산에서 대구까지 어떻게 가나요?
    You: Busaneseo daegukkaji eotteoke ganayo?
    You: “How do I get to Busan from Daegu?”
  • Father: 부산역에서 KTX 열차 티켓을 하고나서…
    Father: Busanyeogeseo KTX yeolcha tikeseul hagonaseo…
    Father: “You need to buy a KTX ticket from a station called Busan station and ….”

2- ~은 어디에 있어요? (~eun eodie isseoyo?)

This phrase means “Where is ~?”

Example 1:
You’re at a shop and want to use the bathroom.

  • You: 화장실은 어디에 있어요?
    You: Hwajangsireun eodie isseoyo?
    You: “Where is the bathroom?”
  • Staff: 가게 밖으로 나가면 바로 오른쪽에 있어요.
    Staff: Gage bakkeuro nagamyeon baro oreunjjoge isseoyo.
    Staff: “Go out of the shop; the toilet is on the right-hand side.”

Example 2:
You feel tired after visiting many places and want to go back to the hotel to rest, but you’re not sure where the closest station is.

  • You: 여기서 가장 가까운 지하철역은 어디에 있어요?
    You: Yeogiseo gajang gakkaun jihacheollyeogeun eodie isseoyo?
    You: “Where is the closest subway station from here?”
  • Stranger: 횡단보도 건너면 홍대역이 보일거예요.
    Stranger: Hoengdanbodo geonneomyeon hongdaeyeogi boilgeoyeyo.
    Stranger: “Just cross the road and you’ll be able to see the station called Hongdae.”

3- Vocabulary for Directions

Here’s some useful vocabulary:

Vocabulary Romanization Translation
…쪽으로 …jjogeuro towards
마주보고 majubogo facing
옆에 yeope by
뒤에 dwie behind
오른쪽 oreunjjok right
왼쪽 oenjjok left

Reference: Position/Direction

There are several example sentences using these vocabulary words in our vocabulary list about positions and directions. Do check out the page for more learning material.

4- 여기는 어디인가요? (yeogineun eodiingayo?)

This phrase means “Where am I?”

When you’re not sure where you are, or you want to know the name of the place you’re at, use this phrase to ask. 어디 means “where” in Korean. If you want to double-check your location with someone, replace 어디 with the name of the place.

For example, if you want to know whether the place you’re in is 가로수길 (garosu-gil), you should ask 여기는 가로수길인가요? (yeogineun garosugiringayo?) which translates to “Am I in Garosu gil?”

Example 1:

  • You: 길을 잃었어요. 여기는 어디인가요?
    You: Gireul ileosseoyo. Yeogineun eodiingayo?
    You: “I am lost. Where am I?”
  • Stranger: 음… 어디로 가시는데요? 가는길 알려드릴께요.
    Stranger: Eum… eodiro gasineundeyo? Ganeungil allyeodeurilkkeyo.
    Stranger: “Hmm…where are you heading to? I may be able to tell you the way.”

Example 2:
You’re with a tour guide and you want to say how beautiful this place is.

  • You: 정말 아름다운 곳이네요. 여기는 어디인가요?
    You: Jeongmal areumdaun gosineyo. Yeogineun eodiingayo?
    You: “This place is really beautiful. Where is this place?”
  • Guide: 광화문이라고 하는 곳입니다. 아름답지요?
    Guide: Gwanghwamunirago haneun gosimnida. Areumdapjiyo?
    Guide: “It’s called Gwanghwamun. Isn’t it beautiful?”

5- 여기서 ~까지는 많이 먼가요/가까운가요? (yeogiseo ~kkajineun mani meongayo/gakkaungayo?)

This phrase means “From here to ~, is it far/close?”

Use this phrase when you want to ask how far or close something is from your current location.멀다 (meolda) is “far” and 가깝다 (gakkapda) is “close” in Korean. To make each word into a question, they become 먼가요? (meongayo) meaning “Is it far?” and 가까운가요? (gakkaungayo?) meaning “Is it close by?” respectively.

Example 1:
You’re at Daegu Station and want to go to Palgongsan, a tourist favorite in Daegu.

  • You: 팔공산은 여기서 많이 먼가요?
    You: Palgongsaneun yeogiseo mani meongayo?
    You: “Is Palgongsan far from here?”

Example 2:
You’ve just landed in Jeju International Airport. Your friend comes to pick you up and you’re waiting for a bus to go to your friend’s house.

  • You: (너의) 집은 여기서 많이 멀어?
    You: (neoui) Jibeun yeogiseo mani meoreo?
    You: “Is your house far from here?”
  • Friend: 음, 버스타고 한 20분 정도 가야해. 그렇게 멀진 않아.
    Friend: Eum, beoseutago han isipbun jeongdo gayahae. Geureoke meoljin ana.
    Friend: “Hmm, it takes about 20 minutes by bus. It’s not too far.”

Overflow of Water in a Village


6. Essential Korean Phrases: Emergencies

1- 도와주세요. (dowajuseyo.)

This phrase translates to “Please help me.”

When you’re in need of help, use this phrase to get people’s attention. Be careful when you use this phrase though, because the meaning changes depending on your intonation. You can also request help more formally by stating, 실례하지만 도와주시겠어요? (sillyehajiman dowajusigesseoyo?) which means “I am sorry to bother you, but could you please help?”

Example 1:
You were hiking at a mountain called 북한산 (bukansan) in Seoul and you injured yourself. You see a number of hikers not far from where you are.

  • You: 도와주세요! , 도와주세요!
    You: Dowajuseyo! Dowajuseyo!
    You: “Please help! Please help!”

Example 2:
You need to call an ambulance, and you go to a help desk for help.

  • You: 응급상황이예요, 도와주세요!
    You: Eunggeupsanghwangiyeyo, dowajuseyo!
    You: “It’s an emergency! Please help!”

2- 경찰 불러주세요. (gyeongchal bulleojuseyo.)

This phrase means “Please call the police.”

Use this phrase when you’re in danger. Alternatively, you can call the police by dialing 112. If you want to call an ambulance, which is called 응급차 (eunggeupcha) or 일일구 (irilgu), simply say the word followed by 불러주세요 (bulleojuseyo) meaning “Please call.”

Example 1:
You want to ask for help from a person at the service desk.

  • Help desk: 무엇을 도와드릴까요?
    Help desk: Mueoseul dowadeurilkkayo?
    Help desk: “How may I help you?”
  • You: 누가 지갑을 훔쳐갔어요, 경찰 불러주세요.
    You: Nuga jigabeul humchyeogasseoyo, gyeongchal bulleojuseyo.
    You: “My wallet is stolen and I would like to call the police.”
  • Help desk: 네, 지금 바로 하겠습니다.
    Help desk: Ne, jigeum baro hagetseumnida.
    Help desk: “Okay, will do it now.”

Example 2:
A stranger approaches you and tries to steal your bag.

  • You: 도와주세요! 누가 경찰 불러 주세요!
    You: Dowajuseyo! Nuga gyeongchal bulleo juseyo!
    You: “Please help! Call the police for me!”

3- ~를 다쳤어요. (~reul dachyeosseoyo.)

This phrase means “I injured my ~.”

When you visit a hospital, you need to be able to tell the doctor which part of your body is injured. Unless you go to an international hospital that offers a free interpreter service, you’ll need to speak basic Korean at a local hospital.

If you want to say that you’re just in pain, just say ~가 아파요. (~ga apayo) which means “I feel pain in my~.”

Here’s a vocabulary list of body parts for you to memorize:

Vocabulary Romanization Translation
머리 meori head
다리 dari leg(s)
손가락 songarak finger(s)
발목 balmok ankle(s)
무릎 mureup knee(s)
팔꿈치 palkkumchi elbow(s)
손목 sonmok wrist(s)
pal arm(s)

Reference: Body Parts, KoreanClass101 Vocabulary list

The vocabulary words above are just a small portion of the entire vocabulary list from KoreanClass101. If you want to check out the entire list, visit our Body Parts vocabulary list on our website. We also have many free lessons on describing body parts in Korean, so check our website for more.

Example 1:
You’re at a local hospital and need to explain which part of your body is injured.

  • Doctor: 무슨일로 오셨나요?
    Doctor: Museunillo osyeonnayo?
    Doctor: “What made you come here today?”
  • You: 산책하다가 발목을 다쳤어요.
    You: Sanchaekadaga balmogeul dachyeosseoyo.
    You: “I injured my ankle while walking.”
  • Doctor: 한번 살펴 보겠습니다.
    Doctor: Hanbeon salpyeo bogetseumnida.
    Doctor: “Let me have a look at your ankle.”

Example 2:
You weren’t cautious enough when crossing the pedestrian road. Unfortunately, you were run over by a car and your bone is broken.

  • You: 걸을 수가 없어요. 뼈를 다친것 같아요.
    You: Georeul suga eopseoyo. Ppyeoreul dachingeot gatayo.
    You: “I can’t walk. I think my bone is broken.”
  • Driver: (calling an ambulance) 여보세요, 차사고가 났는데요, 사람이 크게 다친것 같습니다.
    Driver: Yeoboseyo, chasagoga nanneundeyo, sarami keuge dachingeot gatseumnida.
    Driver: “Hello, there was a car accident and I think that the person is badly injured.”

4- 지갑/여권을 잃어버렸어요. (jigap/yeogwoneul ileobeoryeosseoyo.)

This phrase means “I lost my wallet/passport.”

Your wallet and passport are the most valuable items while traveling around the world, and you certainly don’t want to ruin your entire trip over missing items. Use this phrase when you want to say that you’ve lost your belongings.

Here’s a list of items that people may lose while traveling:

Vocabulary Romanization Translation
don money
티켓 tiket ticket
시계 sigye watch
악세사리 aksesari accessories
귀중품 gwijungpum valuable items

Example 1:
You’re about to head to the airport, and realize that your passport is missing.

  • You: 어머, 여권을 잃어버린것 같아.
    You: Eomeo, yeogwoneul ileobeoringeot gata.
    You: “Oh no, I think I lost my passport.”
  • Friend: 어디서 잃어버렸는데?
    Friend: Eodiseo ileobeoryeonneunde?
    Friend: “Where did you lose it?”

Example 2:

  • Friend: 어머, 지갑이 어디갔지?
    Friend: Eomeo, jigabi eodigatji?
    Friend: “Oh no, where is my wallet?”
  • You: 지갑을 잃어버렸어?
    You: Jigabeul ileobeoryeosseo?
    You: “Did you lose your wallet?”
  • Friend: 휴, 찾았다!
    Friend: Hyu, chajatda!
    Friend: “Phew, I found it!”

5- Emergency Numbers to Remember

These are numbers that come in handy when you’re in trouble:

  1. 112 - Police
  2. 119 - Ambulance
  3. 111 - National Security
  4. 113 - Reporting spies
  5. 182 - Missing persons

Here, you can learn more vocabulary and phrases: “Words and Phrases to Help You in an Emergency.”

A Group of Young People Chatting


7. Essential Korean Phrases: Flattery Phrases

1- 한국 음식을 좋아해요. (Hanguk eumsigeul joahaeyo.)

This phrase means “I like Korean food.”

Koreans tend to worry when they see foreigners eating spicy food—you’ll hear 너무 맵지 않나요? (neomu maepji annayo?) which is them asking you “Is it not too spicy for you?” or 조금 매운데, 괜찮아요? (jogeum maeunde, gwaenchanayo?) meaning “It’s a bit spicy, is this okay?” when you order a spicy dish.

Don’t worry too much when you hear this, because they’re actually complimenting you for trying Korean dishes and they really do hope that you enjoy the food.

To say a specific dish, just replace 한국 음식 (hanguk eumsik) meaning “Korean food” with the name of your favorite dish. For example, if you like 삼계탕 (samgyetang) or “ginseng chicken soup,” you can say 삼계탕(을) 좋아해요 (samgyetang(eul) joahaeyo). Let’s have a look at more examples below:

Example 1:

  • Friend: 어떤 음식 좋아해?
    Friend: Eotteon eumsik joahae?
    Friend: “What kind of cuisine do you like?”
  • You: 매운걸 좋아해서 한국 음식을 많이 좋아해.
    You: Maeungeol joahaeseo hanguk eumsigeul mani joahae.
    You: “I like spicy food, so I like Korean food very much.”
  • Friend: 잘됐다! 집근처에 맛집있는데, 같이 갈래?
    Friend: Jaldwaetda! jipgeuncheoe matjibinneunde, gachi gallae?
    Friend: “That’s great! There’s a good restaurant around here, do you want to go together?”

Example 2:

  • Elder person: 매운 음식 좋아해요?
    Elder person: Maeun eumsik joahaeyo?
    Elder person: “Do you like spicy food?”
  • You: 네, 좋아해요.
    You: Ne, joahaeyo.
    You: “Yes, I do.”

2- 한국문화에 관심이 많아요. (Hangungmunhwae gwansimi manayo.)

Use this phrase to say “I am interested in Korean culture.”

Has anyone ever asked you what made you become interested in Korea? ~에 관심이 많아요. (~e gwansimi manayo.) is a phrase to say that you “are interested in ~.” You can replace the first noun with something else, such as 한국 역사 (hanguk yeoksa) meaning “Korean history,” 케이팝 (keipap) meaning “K-pop,” 한국 드라마 (hanguk deurama) meaning “Korean drama,” and so forth.

Here are some examples:

Example 1:
Jamie is a new exchange student, and Sumi and Soyeon are talking.

  • 수미: 제이미가 왜 한국에 왔을까?
    Sumi: Jeimiga wae hanguge wasseulkka?
    Sumi: “I wonder what brought Jamie to South Korea.”
  • 소연: 한국문화에 관심이 많아서 여기로 왔데.
    Soyeon: Hangungmunhwae gwansimi manaseo yeogiro watde.
    Soyeon: “He is here because he is interested in Korean culture.”

Example 2:
Your friend asks why you’re interested in Korean culture. You want to say that you became interested in it after watching Korean dramas.

  • You: 한국 드라마를 좋아해서 한국문화에 관심이 많아요.
    You: Hanguk deuramareul joahaeseo hangungmunhwae gwansimi manayo.
    You: “I became interested in Korean culture because of Korean dramas.”

3- 한국 사람은 친절해요. (Hanguk sarameun chinjeolhaeyo.)

Use this phrase to say “Korean people are friendly.”

Koreans are friendly to tourists, so they will be happy to help you out when you’re in need of help. To say that Koreans are friendly, you can say 한국 사람은 친절해요 (Hanguk sarameun chinjeolhaeyo.).

Example 1:
A friend asked how your trip to Korea was. You want to compliment Korean people.

  • Friend: 한국 여행 어땠어?
    Friend: Hanguk yeohaeng eottaesseo?
    Friend: “How was your trip to Korea?”
  • You: 응, 재미있었어. 한국 사람은 정말 친절한것 같아.
    You: Eung, jaemiisseosseo. Hanguk sarameun jeongmal chinjeolhangeot gata.
    You: “Yeah, it was fun. Koreans are really friendly.”

Example 2:

  • You: 드라마를 보면 한국 사람들은 친절한것 같아.
    You: Deuramareul bomyeon hanguk saramdeureun chinjeolhangeot gata.
    You: “Based on Korean drama, I think that Koreans are friendly.”

4- 친구가 되고 싶어요. 페이스북/인스타그램 있어요? (chinguga doego sipeoyo. peiseubuk/inseutageuraem isseoyo?)

Use this phrase to say “I want to be your friend. Do you have a Facebook/Instagram?”

You’ll encounter many locals while traveling in South Korea. If you meet someone that you want to keep in touch with long-term, say this phrase.

Example 1:
You meet a local while traveling in Jeju and you want to keep in touch with her.

  • You: 친구가 되고 싶어요. 혹시 페이스북이나 인스타그램 있어요?
    You: Chinguga doego sipeoyo. hoksi peiseubugina inseutageuraem isseoyo?
    You: “I want to be your friend. Do you have a Facebook or Instagram by any chance?”
  • Friend: 페이스북은 없고, 인스타그램은 있어요.
    Friend: Peiseubugeun eopgo, inseutageuraemeun isseoyo.
    Friend: “I don’t have a Facebook account, but I use Instagram.”


8. Essential Korean Phrases: Useful Phrases to Go Through Language Problems

World Map

1- 영어 할 수 있어요? (Yeongeo hal su isseoyo?)

Use this phrase to ask someone “Can you speak English?”

Example 1:
A staff member is explaining something to you in Korean and you want to ask if they speak English.

  • You: 혹시 영어 할 수 있어요?
    You: Hoksi yeongeo hal su isseoyo?
    You: “Do you speak English by any chance?”
  • Staff: 죄송해요, 할수 없어요.
    Staff: Joesonghaeyo, halsu eopseoyo.
    Staff: “Sorry, no.”

2 - 적어주실래요? (jeogeojusillaeyo?)

This useful phrase means “Can you write it down?”

Example 1:
Your homestay mother suggests that you visit a museum called 전쟁기념관 (jeonjaengginyeomgwan) which is “The War Memorial of Korea,” in English. You want to search for this place on the Internet.

  • You: 전쟁기념관을 종이에 적어주실래요?
    You: Jeonjaengginyeomgwaneul jongie jeogeojusillaeyo?
    You: “Can you please write “The War Memorial of Korea” on the paper?”

Example 2:
A stranger is explaining the directions to go to 63 빌딩 (yuksam building) or the “63building, but it seems quite complicated.

  • You: 죄송하지만, 종이에 적어주실래요?
    You: Joesonghajiman, jongie jeogeojusillaeyo?
    You: “I am sorry, but could you please write the directions down?”

3- 죄송해요, 한국말 잘못해요. (Joesonghaeyo, hangungmal jalmothaeyo.)

Use this phrase to let someone know “I am sorry, I am not good at Korean.”

Example 1:
An elderly person approaches you with a smile and asks many questions in Korean. You want to say that you can’t speak Korean.

  • You: 죄송해요, 저는 한국말을 못해요.
    You: Joesonghaeyo, jeoneun hangungmareul mothaeyo.
    You: “I am sorry, I can’t speak Korean.”

Example 2:
A stranger approaches you and asks some questions in Korean. You want to understand what he’s saying.

  • You: 죄송해요, 한국말(을) 잘못해요. 조금 더 천천히 말해줄래요?
    You: Joesonghaeyo, hangungmal(eul) jalmothaeyo. Jogeum deo cheoncheonhi malhaejullaeyo?
    You: “Sorry, I am not good at Korean. Can you please speak slowly?”

4- 조금 더 천천히 말해주시겠어요? (jogeum deo cheoncheonhi malhaejusigesseoyo?)

This phrase, hinted at earlier, means “Can you please speak slowly?”

You may want to practice speaking in Korean as much as possible. However, sometimes you may struggle to understand the language, especially when someone speaks to you too quickly. Use this phrase to kindly ask a speaker to speak more slowly for you.

Example 1:
You’re on the phone to have food delivered. The staff member speaks too fast and you want him to slow down for you.

  • You: 죄송하지만, 조금 더 천천히 말해주시겠어요?
    You: Joesonghajiman, jogeum deo cheoncheonhi malhaejusigesseoyo?
    You: “I am sorry, but could you please slow down for me?”
  • Staff: 아, 죄송합니다.
    Staff: A, joesonghamnida.
    Staff: “Ah, I apologize.”

Example 2:
Your friend is upset about something and struggles to speak clearly.

    You: 미안, 너무 빨리 말을 해서 잘 못알아들었어. 조금만 더 천천히 말해줄래?
    You: Mian, neomu ppalli mareul haeseo jal mosaradeureosseo. Jogeumman deo cheoncheonhi malhaejullae?
    You: “Sorry, you spoke too fast so I didn’t quite catch you. Can you speak more slowly?”

5- 이것은 어떻게 읽나요? (Igeoseun eotteoke ingnayo?)

Use this phrase to ask someone “How do you read this?”

If you want to ask how to pronounce a word or sentence, say 이것은 어떻게 발음하나요? (Igeoseun eotteoke bareumhanayo?) or “How do I pronounce this?”

Example 1:

  • You: 이건 어떻게 읽어?
    You: Igeon eotteoke ilgeo?
    You: “How do I read this?”
  • Friend: 간장게장이라고 해.
    Friend: Ganjanggejangirago hae.
    Friend: “It is soy sauce raw crab.”

A Couple Looking at Paintings


9. Essential Korean Phrases: Buying Tickets at a Museum

1 - 성인 1장 주세요. (seongin hanjang juseyo.)

Use this phrase to say “One ticket (adult) please.”

There are many museums and exhibitions worth visiting in Korea. Most places, unless you go to a museum in a very rural area, offer pamphlets and free guides in many different languages, so you won’t have much trouble navigating.

However, since you’re a Korean learner, let’s learn some useful travel phrases!

Take a look at the column for the price at the Daerim museum. This is the typical column that you’ll see at any museum or exhibition that you go to in Korea. “Adult” in Korean is 성인 (seongin). “Children” is 어린이 (eorini) and “student” is 학생 (haksaeng).

Let’s take a look at two examples:

Example 1:
You arrive at 김치박물관 (gimchibangmulgwan) or “Museum Kimchikan.” You want to buy a ticket.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 성인 1장 주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, seongin hanjang juseyo.
    You: “Hello, one ticket (adult) please.”

Example 2:
You arrive at 전쟁기념관 (jeonjaengginyeomgwan) or “War Memorial of Korea.” You’re with your younger sister who is only fifteen years old.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 성인 1장이랑 어린이 1 장주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, seongin hanjangirang eorini hanjangjuseyo.
    You: “Hello, one adult and one child please.”

2- 팜플렛 주세요. (pampeullet juseyo)

Asking for pamphlets is easy too. You just need to use this phrase, which means “Please give me a pamphlet.” You’ll be able to get a pamphlet in many different languages at the counter.

Example 1:

  • Clerk: 몇장드릴까요.
    Clerk: Myeotjangdeurilkkayo.
    Clerk: “How many (tickets) would you like?”
  • You: 성인 1장 주세요.
    You: Seongin hanjang juseyo.
    You: “One adult, please.”
  • Clerk: 5,000원입니다. 팜플렛 필요하세요?
    Clerk: Ocheonwonimnida. Pampeullet pillyohaseyo?
    Clerk: “It’s 5,000 won. Do you need a pamphlet?”
  • You: 네, 영어 팜플렛 주세요.
    You: Ne, yeongeo pampeullet juseyo.
    You: “Yes, an English pamphlet please.”

3- 무료 가이드있나요? (muryo gaideuinnayo?)

Use this phrase to ask “Is there a free tour?”

Many museums offer free guides in English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese. Some places only offer them once per day, or even once per month, so do check their schedule on their website in advance if you want to participate.

Example 1:

  • You: 이곳에 무료 가이드 있나요?
    You: Igose muryo gaideu innayo?
    You: “Is there a free tour?”
  • Clerk: 네, 오늘 오후 5시에 영어로 진행되는 무료 가이드 있습니다.
    Clerk: Ne, oneul ohu daseotsie yeongeoro jinhaengdoeneun muryo gaideu itseumnida.
    Clerk: “Yes, there is one in English at 17:00 (5 PM).”

4- 오늘 특별한 행사 하나요? (Oneul teukbyeolhan haengsa hanayo?)

Want to know if a museum has any special events? Use this phrase to ask a clerk. It translates to “Is there a special event?”

Example 1:
You hear loud music coming out of the museum.

  • You: 오늘 특별한 행사 하나요?
    You: Oneul teukbyeolhan haengsa hanayo?
    You: “Is there a special event?”
  • Clerk: 네, 방금 시작했어요.
    Clerk: Ne, banggeum sijakaesseoyo.
    Clerk: “Yes, it has just started.”

5- 오디오 가이드 있나요? (odio gaideu innayo?)

Use this phrase to ask “Is there an audio guide?”

Example 1:

  • You: 영어 오디오 가이드 있나요?
    You: Yeongeo odio gaideu innayo?
    You: “Is there an audio guide?”
  • Clerk: 네, 있습니다. 몇개 드릴까요?
    Clerk: Ne, itseumnida. myeotgae deurilkkayo?
    Clerk: “Yes, there is. How many would you like?”
  • You: 한 개 주세요.
    You: Han gae juseyo.
    You: “Just one, please.”

A Lady Holding a DSLR Camera


10. Essential Korean Phrases: Taking Pictures

1- 이곳은 사진 찍어도 괜찮은 장소인가요? (igoseun sajin jjigeodo gwaenchaneun jangsoingayo?)

Use this phrase to ask “Is it okay to take a picture in this place?”

You can take pictures most places, but it’s always safe to ask if you’re not sure.

Example 1:
You’re at the museum and want to ask if you can take pictures.

  • You: 이곳은 사진 찍어도 괜찮은 장소인가요?
    You: Igoseun sajin jjigeodo gwaenchaneun jangsoingayo?
    You: “Is it okay to take pictures here?”
  • Staff: 네, 플래시 없이 해주십시오.
    Staff: Ne, peullaesi eopsi haejusipsio.
    Staff: “Yes, but without flash please.”

2- 사진 같이 찍어요. (sajin gachi jjigeoyo.)

This phrase translates to “Let’s take a picture together.”

Use this phrase when you want to take a picture with someone. Alternatively, you can ask for permission by asking 사진 같이 찍어도 괜찮아요? (Sajin gachi jjigeodo gwaenchanayo?) meaning “Is it okay to take a picture with you?”

Example 1:

  • You: 사진 같이 찍어요.
    You: Sajin gachi jjigeoyo.
    You: “Let’s take a picture together.”
  • Friend: 좋아요.
    Friend: Joayo.
    Friend: “OK.”

3- 사진 찍어주시겠어요? (Sajin jjigeojusigesseoyo?)

This phrase means “Can you please take a picture of us?”

Example 1:
You’re traveling alone in 전주한옥마을 (jeonjuhanongmaeul) or “Jeonju Hanbok Village” and you want to ask someone to take a picture of you with a traditional Korean house in the background.

  • You: 죄송하지만, 사진 찍어주시겠어요?
    You: Joesonghajiman, sajin jjigeojusigesseoyo?
    You: “I am sorry to interrupt, but could you please take a picture of me?”
  • Stranger: 그럼요.
    Stranger: Geureomyo.
    Stranger: “Sure.”

Example 2:
You’re at 롯데월드 (rotdewoldeu) or “Lotte World” and want to ask someone to take a picture of you and your girlfriend.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 저희 사진 1장만 찍어주시겠어요?
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, jeohui sajin 1jangman jjigeojusigesseoyo?
    You: “Hello, could you please take a picture of us?”
  • Stranger: 그럼요.
    Stranger: Geureomyo.
    Stranger: “Sure.”

Someone Holding Miniature Korean Flag


11. How KoreanClass101.com Can Help You with Korean

If you have any questions regarding the travel phrases mentioned above (or other questions about Korean culture), we’ll be more than happy to answer them for you at the KoreanClass101.com forum. On our site, especially the forum, you can find tons of cultural insights and useful tips to help you study Korean. Feel free to check out the forum when you have time.

Also, KoreanClass101.com offers many free Korean lessons; you can access these lessons by simply creating a free lifetime account.

Learning Korean travel phrases, along with essential cultural information, is no easy task. But the more that you use Korean travel phrases, the easier it will get. Trust us!

We hope that you found this blog useful, and that you enjoy your trip to Korea! These basic Korean travel phrases for tourists will help you get around South Korea like it’s nothing. :)
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Top 10 Must-Try Korean Street Foods in Seoul

Are you planning to travel to Seoul sometime soon? You shouldn’t miss these foods! Today, we’re going to introduce the top ten must-try street foods in Seoul, South Korea. Also, we’ll introduce essential phrases to use when you order food in Korea.

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1. List of 10 Must-Eat Korean Street Foods

There are many delicious and exotic Korean traditional foods that you can—and should—try. However, many travelers struggle to find what to eat in Seoul. Don’t worry; in this article, we’re going to introduce ten Korean street food names, along with their description and many pictures and information about each food so that you’ll know exactly what you’re ordering next time you go to the market in Korea. We’re sure you’ll find a food you love here, maybe even some tteokbokki street food!

Let’s have a look at the list of Korean street foods:

1- 해물파전 (haemulpajeon) — Seafood Pajeon

Seafood Pajeon

해물파전 (haemulpajeon) is a seafood scallion pancake which is a traditional Korean-style pancake. You can eat this versatile Korean street food as a main dish, or a side dish, or even as an appetizer or snack. The most famous Korean-style pancake is the seafood pancake, and if you’re going to cook this by yourself, you can put any ingredients in it such as Kimchi or vegetables.

해물파전 (haemulpajeon) can be found in any markets in Seoul and each store may have a variety of Korean-style pancakes such as 김치전 (gimchijeon) meaning “Kimchi pancake,” 야채전 (yachaejeon) meaning “vegetable pancake,” and so on. So have a look and enjoy the variety!

  • If you’re not familiar with Korean-style pancakes, here are some food images.

2- 김밥 (gimbap) — Korean Traditional Seaweed Rice Rolls

Korean Traditional Seaweed Rice Rolls

김밥 (Gimbap) is a Korean dish of steamed white rice and other ingredients such as ham, egg, and various vegetables, rolled in sheets of dried laver seaweed and served in bite-size slices. Koreans prepare 도시락 (dosirak) or a “lunch box,” which is filled with gimbap when they go on a picnic. Or sometimes they eat it with 떡볶이 (tteokbokki), 순대 (sundae), or 튀김 (twigim) at a 분식집 (bunsikjip) or “snack stand.”

In addition, there’s a variety of Gimbap, including:

  • 참치 김밥 (chamchi gimbap) or “Tuna Gimbap”
  • 야채 김밥 (yachae gimbap) or “Vegetable Gimbap”
  • 김치 김밥 or “Kimchi Gimbap”
  • 불고기 김밥 or “Bulgogi Gimbap”

The price varies depending on which Gimbap you buy, but do read through the long list of gimbap because there are so many! 김밥 can be found easily at markets in Seoul, so don’t miss out on this.

  • If you’re not familiar with Gimbap, here are some food images.

3- 순대 (sundae) — Black Pudding

Black Pudding

순대 (sundae) is a pork sausage, filled with a mix of sweet rice and sweet potato vermicelli noodles. This is normally called “black pudding” in Korea, and many food stands sell this with 떡볶이 (tteokbokki) and 튀김 (twigim) as a set meal.

The sauce offered contains a mixture of salt, ground pepper, and 고춧가루 (gochugaru) or “red chili pepper flakes” to add more flavor.

순대 (sundae) can be found in any markets in Seoul, and also comes in various meals such as:

  • 순댓국 (sundaetguk) which is black pudding soup served in ttukbaegi
  • 순대볶음 (Sundaebokkeum) which is stir-fried black pudding with vegetables and gochujang

These are specialized dishes, so try to find a few famous restaurants in Seoul that make various 순대 (sundae) meals.

  • If you’re not familiar with Sundae, here are some images.

4- 떡볶이 (tteokbokki) — Stir-fried Rice Cake in Gochujang Sauce

Stir-fried Rice Cake in Gochujang Sauce

Your trip isn’t complete if you don’t try this delicious Korean food. 떡볶이 (tteokbokki) is a popular South Korean spicy food that’s made from rice cakes called 떡면 or “rice cake noodles.”

Many ingredients are added when making this meal, such as boiled eggs, fish cakes, scallions, carrots, onions, and more. This meal comes in two different flavors: the original 떡볶이 (tteokbokki) that’s seasoned with spicy gochujang, and 궁중떡볶이 (gungjungtteokbokki) which is a soy sauce-based Tteokbokki.

If you want to add more flavor, simply order extra ingredients (it will cost a little extra). Some popular ingredients are melted cheese or 라면 (ramyeon) meaning “Korean noodle.” You’ll easily find tteokbokki in any Seoul market.

  • If you’re not familiar with Tteokbokki, here are some images.
  • If you’re not familiar with Soy Sauce Tteokbokki, here are some images.

5- 튀김 (twigim)

Twigim

튀김 (twigim), direct translation being “fried” in English, is Korean-style fried vegetables that taste great with 떡볶이 (tteokbokki) and 순대 (sundae). You can even order 순대튀김 (sundaetwigim) or “fried black pudding” which is one of the most famous dishes that Koreans order at food stands. If you’re looking for some very tasty Korean exotic food, this might just be for you. If you want something more adventurous, we suggest eating it with Ttokbokki sauce to add spiciness.

  • If you’re not familiar with 튀김 (twigim) here are some images.

6- 한과 (hangwa)

Hangwa

한과 (hangwa) are traditional Korean confections and they have a variety of sweets. These Korean confections appear in traditional Korean ceremonies such as weddings and ancestral rites.

In addition, if you go to a touristic area such as 인사동 (insadong), there are a number of Korean traditional tea cafes that sell 한과 (hangwa). There are several varieties of hangwa you can try while traveling in South Korea:

Ingredients in these confections are very healthy, so you can’t miss out on these delicious Korean confections!

  • If you’re not familiar with original 한과 (hangwa), here are some images.

Do you want to try some more sweets? Try some Korean rice snacks such as:

7- 만두 (mandu)

Mandu

If you’re a big fan of dumplings, you can’t miss out on 만두 (mandu) in Korea. You can easily find frozen dumplings at any supermarket in South Korea, and of course you can eat them at a restaurant too. There are many kinds of dumplings, including:

8- 회오리 감자 (hoeori gamja)

Tornado Potato with Sausage

회오리 감자 (hoeori gamja) or “spiral potatos,” also known as 트위스트 감자 (teuwiseuteu gamja) meaning “twist potatoes” or ‘토네이도 감자 (toneido gamja) meaning “tornado potatoes,” are a popular street food in South Korea. They’re deep fried spiral-cut whole potatos on a skewer. You can enjoy this food with different kinds of spices.

  • Here are some images, if you’re not familiar with this food.

9- 뽑기 (ppopgi)

Korean Candy

뽑기 (ppopgi) or 달고나 (dalgona) is a Korean candy made with melted sugar and baking soda. This was a popular Korean street food back in the 70s and 80s, but it’s become difficult to find these days. Koreans aged between thirty and forty may feel nostalgic when they see this on the street since it was the most popular street food during their childhood.

  • Here are some images, if you’re not familiar with this food.

10- 호떡 (hotteok)

Hotteok

호떡 (hotteok) is a Korean pancake and a popular street food in Korea, especially during the winter. The original is filled with brown sugar, honey, chopped peanuts, and cinnamon. It also comes in different flavors, including:

  • 녹차 호떡 (nokcha hotteok) — “green tea hotteok” [Image]
  • 복분자 호떡 (bokbunja hotteok) — bokbunja rubus coreanus hotteok [Image]
  • 옥수수 호떡 (oksusu hotteok) — “corn hotteok” [Image]
  • 피자 호떡 (pija hotteok) — “pizza hotteok” [Image]

If you like it, you can buy a DIY 호떡 (hotteok) package at a local supermarket. This is perhaps one of the easiest Korean street food recipes that you can find in South Korea.They are easy to make, so give it a try.

  • If you’re not familiar with the original 호떡 (hotteok), here are food images.

2. Phrases to Use When Ordering Korean Street Food

When someone asks “What’s the most popular food in South Korea?” you’re now confident enough to talk about our local Korean street food. You’ve also learned about must-have Korean street foods. So now, let’s try to learn some Korean phrases that’ll come in handy when you order food in South Korea. These are basic phrases, so if you want to learn more, feel free to visit KoreanClass101. We have many free lessons on how to order at a restaurant.

1- What to Say when You Enter a Cafe or Restaurant

2- What to Say When You Order Some Food

  • ~ 주세요 (~juseyo) — “Please give me ~”
  • 추천해 주시겠어요? (chucheonhae jusigesseoyo?) — “Do you have any recommendations?”
  • 이거 많이 매워요? (igeo mani maewoyo?) — “Is this spicy?”

3- What to Say When You Leave a Cafe or Restaurant

3. How Can KoreanClass101 Help You with Korean?

We hope you enjoyed reading our Seoul food guide and hope you have a great time trying different kinds of traditional Korean food in Seoul.

Do you want to learn more about essential phrases in Korean? KoreanClass101 has many lessons to teach you what to say when you enter a cafeteria or a restaurant in South Korea, so feel free to check out these pages as well:

Got some questions about grammar or Korean culture? We have a forum page where you can ask a question to Korean natives. We hope you enjoyed reading this article and good luck with your Korean studies! If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

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The 10 Best Korean Markets in Seoul and Market Locations

The 10 Best Seoul Markets

Are you looking for the best Seoul markets to visit? Then continue reading this article, because we’re going to introduce the top ten famous Seoul street markets so that you can enjoy trying our local Korean food right away! You’ll also find some must-eat restaurants in Seoul on this list!

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1. 서울 광장시장 (Seoul Gwangjang Market) — (map)

Seoul Gwangjang Market

When Koreans think of the famous Korean street market in Seoul, 광장시장 (Gwangjang market) is the first thing that comes to mind. This place is well-known by locals, and of course by tourists. The market has been open for more than 100 years, and you’ll instantly love the place because of the atmosphere and the vibe from the people in the market. Further, this place gives off a very vintage feeling.

Just go around the market and feel free to take a seat if you find a spot for dining. The price is affordable as well and only cash is accepted, so prepare some cash before heading to this market.

Popular Food at Gwangjang Market

※ Click the links below for more information about the food.

Touristic Areas Near Gwangjang Market:

※ Click the names below to check the locations.

2. 서울 망원시장 (seoul mangwonsijang) — (map)

mangwonsijang

This place was introduced in a very famous TV show called “I Live Alone” and since then this market has become a lot more popular. This is a very local place (perhaps not known to tourists) so if you want to blend in with the locals, this place is a must-go.

Popular Food:

Touristic Areas:

3. 서울 구로시장 (seoul gurosijang) — (map)

Korean Street Food

If you’re into vintage style, then 서울 구로시장 (seoul gurosijang) is a must-go spot in Seoul. It has a mixture of past and modern style and is famous for selling clothes, foods, tools, and ingredients that you can hardly find in any other supermarkets in Seoul. Want to go treasure hunting? Then you must go to 서울 구로시장 (seoul gurosijang)!

Popular Food:

Touristic Areas:

4. 서울 세종마을음식문화거리 (seoul sejongmaeureumsingmunhwageori) — (map)

Gyeongbok Station

This place isn’t listed on Google Maps, but it’s very easy to find. The place is located between exit 3 and 4 from 경복궁역 (gyeongbokgungyeok) or “Gyeongbok station.” In addition, there are signs in different languages explaining where to go so you won’t get lost. This place is great for trying different kinds of traditional Korean foods and drinks at an affordable price.

Do you want to experience a glimpse of what young local people have for dinner with their colleagues or friends? Then try this place.

Popular Food:

Touristic Areas:

5. 서울 수유재래시장 (seoul suyujaeraesijang) — (map)

Kkwabaegi

Three different markets are congregated in this market, so you can buy souvenirs for your friends, buy clothing for yourself and others, and most importantly, eat traditional Korean foods. Also, since this place is well-known by many tourists, information is available in four different languages so you won’t have any problem getting around this market.

Popular Food:

  • 꽈배기 (kkwabaegi) — “twisted donuts covered in sugar” [Image]
  • 찹쌀도넛 (chapssal doughnut) — “Korean doughnuts made with glutinous rice flour” [Image]
  • 족발 (jokbal) — “pig’s trotters cooked with soy sauce and spice” [Image]
  • (gim) — “dried seaweed” [Image]

Touristic Areas:

6. 서울 동대문시장 (seoul dongdaemunsijang) — (map)

Dongdaemun_Design_Plaza

동대문시장 (dongdaemunsijang) is the must-go place if you love going shopping. You can negotiate prices and even enjoy shopping in the late evening. There are many street foods around the shopping mall and many shops are located in this area. In addition, you’ll see many free events such as dance competitions for entertainment, so don’t miss out on this.

Popular Food:

Touristic Areas:

7. 서울 경동시장 (seoul gyeongdongsijang) — (map)

Gyeongdong Market

If you’re into health, then this place is a must-go. It was built in 1960 and is specialized in selling all sorts of ingredients for oriental medicine. It’s the biggest ginseng market in South Korea. If you’re interested in oriental medicines, then you can try to visit 한의약박물관 (hanuiyakbangmulgwan) or the “Herb Medicine Museum” to learn about herbs in detail. Also keep in mind that 오미요리연구소 (omiyoriyeongu) or “OME Korean Cooking Class” organizes cooking classes, using different herbs.

Popular Food:

Touristic Areas:

8. 방산시장 (bangsansijang) — (map)

Samgyeopsal

At 방산시장 (bangsansijang), you can buy many DIY materials such as wrapping paper, baking tools, and candles. If you’re into buying tools or any ingredients to make candles or soaps with, this place is the best market to go to, since the price is more affordable than other places.

There’s a very famous restaurant here which has been open for more than sixty years that makes ox bone soup. Also, there’s another famous restaurant which has been open for more than fifty years and this restaurant makes noodles in cold soybean soup. So try them out too.

Popular Food:

Touristic Areas:

9. 남대문시장 (namdaemunsijang) — (map)

Namdaemun Sijang

This market has been open for more than 600 years and therefore many tourists from around the world visit this historical market in Seoul. The great thing about this place is that you can compare different products and prices freely and you’re able to buy stuff at a reasonable price. Since the Seoul Olympics in 1988, 갈치조림 (galchijorim) or “simmered largehead hairtail” has been the most popular dish at this market, so try it out when you can.

Popular Food:

Touristic Areas:

10. 돈암시장 (donamsijang) — (map)

Gamjatang

돈암시장 (donamsijang) was established in the 1970s and is only five minutes from 성신여대역 (seongsinyeodaeyeok) or “Sungshin Women’s University Station.” Since the market is located very close to the Sungshin Women’s University, you’ll see many students from there as well as tourists in this area. This place is famous for selling 감자탕 (gamjatang) or “pork back-bone stew” and 족발 (jokbal) or “pig’s trotters cooked with soy sauce and spice.”

Popular Food:

  • 감자탕 (gamjatang) — “pork back-bone stew” [Image]
  • 족발 (jokbal) — “pig’s trotters cooked with soy sauce and spice” [Image]
  • 보쌈 (bossam) — “belly pork that is boiled in spices and thinly sliced” [Image]
  • 김밥 (gimbap) — “rice and different ingredients wrapped in dried seaweed” [Image]

Touristic Areas:

Korean Phrases to Use in the Market

You’ve also learned about must-have Korean street foods and Seoul market locations. So now, let’s try to learn some useful Korean phrasesyou can use in a market in South Korea. These are basic phrases, so if you want to learn more, feel free to visit KoreanClass101. We have many free lessons on how to order at a restaurant.

How Can KoreanClass101 Help You with Korean?

We hope you enjoyed reading our Seoul Market Guide and hope you have a great time trying different kinds of traditional Korean food in Seoul.

Do you want to learn more about essential phrases in Korean? KoreanClass101 has many lessons to teach you what to say when you enter a cafeteria or a restaurant in South Korea, so feel free to check out these pages as well:

Got some questions about grammar or Korean culture? We have a forum page where you can ask a question to Korean natives. We hope you enjoyed reading this article and good luck with your Korean studies! If you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below.

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Things to Do in South Korea in October

October is the autumn season in South Korea. The leaves on the mountains start to change, becoming red and yellow in hue, and viewing autumn leaves is one of the most popular activities in South Korea. There are also many October festivals and events held during this time that you won’t want to miss out on.

In this blog post, KoreanClass101 will explain to you about what to expect when you travel to South Korea, such as the weather, important public holidays, what to wear in October, and even where to see fall colors in South Korea. In addition, we’re going to introduce a number of October activities and events held in South Korea so that you can add these to your travel itinerary to maximize your trip.

Visiting South Korea in autumn will be fun and easy once you take this info to heart and put it to practice!

October

1. Everything You Need to Know about October in Korea

Weather is just one of those things that travelers check before visiting a country, and for good reason. This way, they know exactly what to expect when they arrive and what clothing to bring with them. In Korea, there are four seasons each year and each season has its own distinctive weather conditions. Below is the weather information, important public holidays, and autumn clothing ideas for South Korea in October.

Weather in South Korea

1- October Weather in South Korea

Here’s some information about fall weather in South Korea in the main cities: Seoul, Daegu, Cheongju, Busan, and Jeju.

City Highest Temp. Lowest Temp. Average Temp. Rainfall
Seoul
[서울]
19.5°C
67.1°F
8.2°C
46.8°F
13.8°C
56.8°F
52mm
2in
Daegu
[대구]
21.3°C
70.3°F
9°C
48.2°F
15.1°C
59.2°F
45mm
1.8in
Cheongju
[청주]
20.4°C
66.7°F
6.8°C
44.2°F
13.6°C
56.5°F
45mm
1.8in
Busan
[부산]
21.2°C
70.2°F
12°C
53.6°F
16.6°C
61.9°F
68mm
2.7in
Jeju
[제주]
21.2°C
70.2°F
13.8°C
56.8°F
17.5°C
72.7°F
64mm
2.5in


※ Reference: climate-data.org

Autumn usually starts in October in South Korea. The weather is warm during the day and becomes cold in the evening. Therefore, it’s important to understand that day-to-night temperature fluctuates significantly; for that reason, many Koreans catch a cold during this time. Make sure to wear many layers to avoid this fate yourself!

Autumn, especially in October, is the best season to travel to South Korea because of the autumn leaves and the autumn flowers covering entire mountains, making South Korea one of the most popular travel destinations in Asia—and one of the most beautiful.

Korean Holiday

2- October Public Holidays in South Korea

Here are two main public holidays in October:

October 3: 개천절 (gaecheonjeol) — “National Foundation Day”

October 9: 한글날 (hangeullal) — “Hangul Proclamation Day”

Because there are two public holidays in October in South Korea, there will be festivals and events held on these two days. On Hangul Day—which is the day that the Korean alphabet was created under 세종대왕 (“Sejong the Great”) during the Chosun Dynasty (1393 to 1910)—there will be a celebration ceremony around the statue of King Sejong, which is located near Gyeongbokgung (경복궁). You won’t want to miss out on this!

Autumn Fashion

3- Autumn Fashion in South Korea

Since the day-to-night temperature fluctuates a lot in October, you need to pay more attention to your clothing. Layering your clothes is the key, and people carry a coat or a warm cardigan in their bag at all times. Wearing a pair of long boots or sandals isn’t recommended because of the temperature difference during the day and the night, so it’s recommended to wear an appropriate pair of shoes—one that can be worn comfortably regardless of the weather conditions you find yourself in.
Also, it occasionally rains, which results in sudden temperature drops; be sure to have an umbrella with you while traveling. If you don’t have one, just about all convenience stores sell transparent umbrellas, prices ranging from 1,000 to 3,000 KRW.

2. Activities to do in Korea

Autumn Festival

1- Autumn Festivals

As mentioned previously, autumn is the best season in South Korea. During this time, many festivals are held at night, and you’ll be able to enjoy spending your time celebrating in the evening without feeling too hot or cold. Here are some of the best places to visit in South Korea during autumn:

  • 서울밤도깨비야시장 (“Seoul Bamdokkaebi Night Market”)

This night market is definitely a must-visit market in South Korea because of the unique experience it offers. Bamdokkaebi Night Market is open from March 30 to October 28, 2018. The night market opens at night and disappears by morning, allowing many tourists to enjoy the true local lifestyle in a friendly atmosphere.

They sell traditional items, handmade products, and traditional Korean food, as well as organize many night events. Also, Bamdokkaebi Night Market is held at a number of locations in Seoul such as Yeouido (여의도), Banpo (반포), Cheonggyecheon (청계천), and so on. So check out their website, which is available in English, Chinese, and Japanese, to decide which market to explore.

  • 부산불꽃축제 (“Busan Fireworks Festival”)

Busan Fireworks Festival is one of the biggest events held in Busan, and attracts many tourists from Korea and other countries. It’s a one-day event, on the 27th of October in 2018. The fireworks are done by the famous beach called Gwangalli Beach (광안리해수욕장; map) in addition to many street performances and food stalls. To give you a clearer idea of what to expect, here’s an article from 2015 with beautiful pictures of the fireworks.

For more information about this festival, visit this website, which is also available in different languages including Japanese, French, Chinese, English, Spanish, German, and Thai.

  • 하동북천 코스모스 메밀꽃 축제 (“Hadong Bukcheon Cosmos and Buckwheat Festival”)

While in Korea, you’ll be able to see a number of fields of cosmos flowers, colorfully decorating the area. Here in Bukcheon, there’s a famous Cosmos and Buckwheat festival held every year, attracting many people all around the world. This year, the festival is going to be held from the 21st of September to the 7th of October. You can check out this website for more information about this festival, and even check out some pictures from this festival so you’ll know what to expect.

  • 민둥산억새꽃축제 (“Mindung Mountain Eulalia Festival”)

When you see a field of Chinese silver grass, Koreans know that it means the autumn is officially started in Korea. Can you imagine a place where an entire mountain is covered with Chinese silver grass? At Mindungsan Mountain (민둥산), you’ll be able to experience this. This festival starts on September 21 and ends on November 4. There are many activities that you can enjoy, such as climbing, photo competitions, and much more.

  • Want to Know More Festivals and Events in October?

Check out “visitkorea” for more attractions. Simply click on a month and a date, and they’ll show you the list of 2018 festivals and events.

Mountain Climbing

2- Hiking and Mountain Climbing

You’ll be mesmerized by the fall colors emblazoning Korea in rich red, yellow, and orange hues. You can’t miss out on hiking in South Korea for some unforgettable scenery!
The 10 Best Mountains for Autumn Foliage in Korea

1 - 설악산 (“Seoraksan National Park”) — location

  • Autumn foliage period: Beginning of October to mid-November
  • Autumn foliage images from Seoraksan National Park
  • 2 - 내장산 (“Naejangsan National Park”) — location

    3 - 대둔산 (Daedunsan) — location

    4 - 백양사 (Baegyangsa) — location

    • Autumn foliage period: Mid-October to mid-November
    • The temple is located in the middle of 내장산 (“Naejang Mountain” — location)
    • Autumn foliage images from Baegyangsa

    5 - 용문사 (“Yongmunsa Temple”) — location

    • Autumn foliage period: Mid-October to mid-November
    • The temple is located in the middle of 용문산 (“Yongmunsan Mountain” — location)
    • Autumn foliage images from Yongmunsa Temple

    6 - 오대산 (“Odaesan National Park”) — location

    7 - 설악산 (“Seoraksan National Park”) — location

    • Autumn foliage period: Mid-October to early November
    • Autumn foliage images from Seoraksan National Park

    8 - 한라산 (Hallasan) — location

    • Autumn foliage period: Late October to mid-November
    • Autumn foliage images from Hallasan

    9 북한산 (Bukhansan) — location

    10 팔공산 (Palgongsan) — location

    3- Beaches

    Visiting beaches in South Korea may not be the most popular activity to do around this time of year, but you’ll still be able to enjoy spending time there since the summer holiday season is over and locals are now visiting mountains to enjoy the fall leaves. You can enjoy sunbathing during the day, as well as food by any of the outdoor restaurants around these beaches in South Korea. Check out “Famous Beaches in Korea” if you want to have a list of places to visit.

    Hanbok

    3. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Korean

    In summary, we’ve looked at autumn temperatures and what to wear in South Korea. We also introduced a number of festivals and events that you can enjoy participating in, along with the famous mountain destinations for autumn foliage in South Korea. Beaches aren’t popular destinations in October, but you can definitely enjoy the quietness of the ocean in October, since October is the time when locals visit the colorful mountains instead.

    Here are some vocabularies related to autumn and traveling. We also have many other lessons related to traveling to Korea, so you might want to check them out on our website as well.

    Autumn Korean Vocabulary

    • 코스모스 (koseumoseu) — “cosmos”
    • 다람쥐 (daramjwi) — “squirrel”
    • 도토리 (dotori) — “acorn”
    • 억새 (eoksae) — “Chinese silver grass”
    • 솔방울 (solbangul) — “conifer cone”
    • 밤 (bam) — “chestnut”
    • 감 (gam) — “persimmon”
    • 은행나무 (eunhaengnamu) — “Maidenhair tree”
    • 단풍잎 (danpungip) — “maple leaf”
    • 가을 (gaeul) — “autumn”
    • 고추잠자리 (gochujamjari) — “dragonfly”
    • 허수아비 (heosuabi) — “scarecrow”
    • 하늘 (haneul) — “sky”

    Here’s another list of Must-know Autumn Vocabularies for you to improve your Korean vocabulary skills. Also, here are lists of phrases to memorize before traveling to South Korea. If they’re difficult to memorize, try to write some of the key phrases down in your notebook and show them to locals when you’re in South Korea.

    We hope you enjoy your trip to South Korea in October and that you’ll share your experience in the comment section.

    Life in Seoul: What is the Cost of Living in South Korea?

    Due to Korean Dramas and Kpop influences, the number of foreigners traveling to Korea or living in Korea has doubled in the last decade. This means that more and more foreigners come to Korea to learn its culture, language, customs and so on. Traveling to Korea certainly helps you understand Korea and also helps you expand your perspective.

    However, it’s important to understand the difference between traveling and moving abroad. Travelers’ main concerns may be where to stay throughout the trip, or where to shop or to eat in Seoul. But for foreigners who want to live in Korea, one of the main concerns may be the cost of living in Korea. I am sure that you are reading this blog because you have been considering moving to Korea and you want to gather as much information as you can.

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    Table of Contents

    1. Cost of Renting an Apartment or a House in Korea
    2. Cost of Food in Korea
    3. Cost of Entertainment in Korea
    4. Cost of Transportation in Korea
    5. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You Learn more Korean

    Don’t worry, KoreanClass101 will look into the living costs, such as renting an apartment, purchasing food, enjoying entertainment etc, in Korea, focusing on Seoul. Also, KoreanClass101 will share some tips on how you can save some money while living in Korea, like locals do, so that you can apply these tips once you start living in Seoul, Korea. We will share some useful Korean phrases and words for you to learn from this article so please keep reading!

    Apartment

    1. Cost of Renting an Apartment or a House in Korea

    If you are going to be an ESL (English as a Second Language) teacher in Korea, you do not need to worry about accommodations, as the company will cover all the expenses including the utility fees. However if you need to find your own place to stay, there are some important things that you need to understand about renting an apartment in Korea.

    Firstly, depending on where you want to live, your rent will be different. For example, if you want to live in Gangnam, Hongdae or any other main district in Seoul, the rent is going to be extremely expensive in comparison to other areas far from the main districts.

    Secondly, Koreans usually search for an apartment to rent through a real estate agent. Koreans believe that it is the safest way to find an apartment and usually the real estate agent will take care of all the work including negotiating with the landlord and reading through the contract for you. If you want to lower the apartment rent, you may want to increase the default deposit. Usually, if you increase the deposit by 10,000,000 KRW, you may be able to lower the rent by 50,000 KRW. Also, sometimes you will notice that the water utility fee is included in the rent. This is certainly negotiable as well. The real estate agent will negotiate this with the landlord on your behalf, and there is no guarantee as it’s really up to the landlord to decide. Also, if you find a house then you will need to pay approximately 10% of your rent to the real estate agent. Koreans also use a number of apps or websites to save on the agency fee, which are 다방 (dabangapp), 직방 (Zigbang), 피터팬의 좋은방 구하기 (peterpanz) and so on.

    List of Korean words for renting an apartment in South Korea:

    1. 월세 (wolse) - “monthly rent”
    2. 관리비 (gwanribi) - “maintenance fee”
    3. 수도요금 (sudoyogeum) - “water bill”
    4. 전기요금 (jeongiyogeum) - “electricity bill”
    5. 계약서 (gyeyakseo) - “contract”

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    Learn the Korean Alphabet, Hangul, from A to Z!

    Food in Korea

    2. Cost of Food in Korea

    It is relatively cheap to eat out or do grocery shopping in South Korea. For example, a carton of milk costs around 2,500 KRW and the price of snacks and sweets usually start from 1,000 KRW. Also, the majority of supermarkets offer special discounts such as 1+1 events or coupon events. So look out for these signs when you go to a supermarket. In addition, a good thing about doing grocery shopping at supermarkets such as major wholesale stores like emart, Home plus and some local supermarkets, is that some supermarkets offer free delivery if you purchase over a certain amount.

    Regarding eating out in South Korea, dishes usually cost from 7,000 KRW if you go to an inexpensive restaurant. Just to give you some hints about the cost of food in Korea, a McDonalds meal usually costs from 6,000 KRW and beers cost from 3,000 KRW. Waiters and waitresses often can speak English if you go to the city area, but if you are living outside the main districts, you will need to order food in Korean. If you learn a few phrases and order food at a restaurant, using honorific Korean, Koreans will appreciate you for trying to speak Korean.

    List of Korean words for food:

    1. 닭 가슴살 (dalg gaseumsal) - “chicken breast”
    2. 사과 (sagwa) - “apple”
    3. 바나나 (banana) - “banana”
    4. 감자 (gamja) - “potato”
    5. 소주 (sojoo) - a Korean alcoholic drink typically made from rice or sweet potatoes.

    Click here to learn more Korean essential vocabulary for fruits and vegetables!

    Entertainment

    3. Cost of Entertainment in Korea

    The cost of entertainment in South Korea really depends on what you want to do as a hobby or for pleasure. For now, let’s focus on movies. If you purchase movie tickets at the counter, the tickets cost usually around 12,000 KRW, without any snacks or drinks. The price of the ticket becomes more expensive based on the type of movie. For a 3D or IMAX film, expect to pay a lot more.

    But don’t worry, there are many ways to enjoy the entertainment without spending a fortune. Here are some tips on what locals do to receive some discounts on their movie tickets.

    1) Try to purchase a movie ticket online as tickets are usually around 7,500 KRW online. Also, try to sign up to receive more discounts, ranging from 10% to 30%.
    2) If you are an active SNS user, many South Korean companies offer free movie tickets or drinks if you share their contents on your SNS pages.
    3) Look out for special discounts offered by different cinemas, such as 조조할인 (jojohal-in), 심야할인(sim-ya-hal-in), 무비데이 (mubidei) and so on.

    List of Korean words for entertainment:

    1. 영화 (yeonghwa) - “movie”
    2. 티켓 (tikes) - “ticket(s)”
    3. 조조할인 (jojohal-in) - discount tickets offered to customers who come to the cinema early in the morning
    4. 무비데이 (mubidei) - Every Wednesday is called “movie day,” and you will receive some discount on the movie tickets.
    5. 심야할인 (sim-ya-hal-in) - discount tickets offered to customers who come to the cinema late at night

    Do you want to challenge yourself by memorizing 100 essential Korean words?
    Click here to access Korean Core 100 Word List for free!

    Transportation

    4. Cost of Transportation

    Transportation in South Korea is extremely convenient and cheap. You will need to purchase a T-Money card, which is a prepaid rechargeable touch-and-go transportation card. You can purchase this card at the ticket machine inside the subway. If you can apply for a credit card in Korea, you can also apply for a card that offers discounts for people who use transportation often. You can consult your bank if you are interested. When you scan your transportation card at a subway station, usually it costs 1,250 KRW for an adult and 720 KRW for a child (with the transportation card). For buses in South Korea, the price differs, from 1,200 KRW to 2,500 KRW, depending on the company and time of the day. Regarding the cost of taxis in Seoul, 일반 (Ilban - “regular taxis”) start from 3,000 KRW and 모범 (mobeom - “deluxe taxis,” black with a yellow top )cost from 5,000 KRW. If you catch a taxi late at night, there will be a late night surcharge.

    List of Korean words for transportation:

    1. 대중교통 (daejung-gyotong) - “public transport”
    2. 버스 (beoseu) - “bus(es)”
    3. 지하철 (jihacheol) - “subway(s)”
    4. 택시 (taegsi) - “taxi(s)”

    What should we watch in Korea? Learn how to express your intentions!

    5. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You Learn more Korean

    In summary, we looked at different areas’ of cost of living in South Korea, focusing only on Seoul. The price range may vary depending on which area you go to, therefore it’s important to compare the prices and do a little bit of research in order to save some money while you are in Korea.

    Regardless of how cheap or expensive it is to live in South Korea, it’s important to study the language before. If you understand Korean language, it will be a lot easier for you to navigate around in South Korea.

    If you have more questions about Korea (apart from cost of living in Korea) why not visit our KoreanClass101 forum? You can get a lot of advice from Koreans or foreigners living in Korea. Also KoreanClass101 has many Korean resources where you can access many study materials for free, so sign up for KoreanClass101 today to receive a free trial!

    Good luck :)

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    Must-Know Korean Phrases for the PyeongChang Olympics 2018

    Korean Phrases that will Help You Enjoy the PyeongChang Olympics to the Fullest!

    The PyeongChang Winter Olympics are approximately one month away, and the anticipation is growing higher and higher. While some people may have been to Korea before, PyeongChang is likely a new place for many–How do you get there? Where are the venues? And once you get there, how do you purchase last minute tickets, or souvenirs to take back home?

    We’ve prepared the phrases that you’ll need for enjoying the PyeongChang Olympics so that you will be able to enjoy the games–whether you will be sitting in the stadium watching it live, or in another part of Korea, watching it on TV–don’t worry, we’ve got you covered!

    Also, don’t forget to download your free cheat sheet - Survival Phrase List for PyeongChang Olympics 2018 - below. (Logged-In Member Only)

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    Table of Contents

    1. Getting There
    2. Buying Tickets
    3. Location of Stadiums
    4. Accommodations
    5. Souvenirs
    6. Where to Enjoy the Games–even if You’re not in PyeongChang
    7. Fun Facts about the PyeongChang Olympics

    1. Getting There

    You’ve landed in Korea! ‘인천국제공항(IncheonGukjeGonghang-Incheon International Airport)’, will likely be the airport you will be landing at when arriving.

    The most convenient route will be going directly from the airport to PyeongChang through KTX, Korea’s express train system. The high speed train cuts the traveling time to an hour from Seoul to Pyeongchang and 98 minutes from Incheon Airport to PyeongChang.

    First, go to the 안내 데스크(information center)’ after arrival and ask where you can purchase KTX tickets:

    평창에 가는 KTX표는 어디에서 살 수 있나요?
    PyeongChange ganeun KTXpyoneun eodieseo sal su innayo?
    “Where can I purchase KTX tickets?”

    If you want to buy one way tickets:
    편도 티켓은 얼마예요?
    pyeondo tikes-eun eolmayeyo?
    “How much are one-way tickets?”

    For round trip tickets:
    왕복 티켓은 얼마예요?
    wangbok tikeseun eolmayeyo?
    “How much are round-trip tickets?”

    KTX already connects Seoul, Busan, Daegu, Gwangju, Yeosu and Daejeon, so it provides accessibility to PyeongChang from various cities throughout Korea. So if you are in Korea and wish to go to PyeongChang, you can simply book your KTX ticket!

    If you wish to book online in advance, there is a website that offers tickets exclusively to foreigners.

    Just remember that 진부역’(Jinbu Station) and ‘강릉역’(Gangneung Station) are the two major train stations that are close to the venues, so keep this in mind when you are booking your tickets.

    Another option would be taking an ‘시외버스’(inter-city bus) from Seoul–the bus ride takes about 2 hours and will cost you about 10,700-12,200won(approximately 9-11 US dollars).
    Buy your bus ticket by asking:

    “평창에 가는 버스표 주세요.”
    PyeongChange ganeun beoseupyo juseyo
    “I’d like a bus ticket for PyeongChang.”

    If you want to include the number of tickets you wish to buy, just include the number of tickets you wish to purchase:

    “평창에 가는 버스표 두 장 주세요.”
    PyeongChange ganeun beoseupyo dujang juseyo
    “Please give me two bus tickets for PyeongChang.”

    Transfering to a domestic flight is another option, because unfortunately, there is no international airport in PyeongChang. This means that you will need transfer to a connecting flight that takes you to the nearby city of ‘양양(YangYang)’.

    Once you are there, you can take the bus by going to the 강릉 시외버스 터미널(Gangneung Intercity Bus Terminal). The bus ride will take approximately 3 hours 13 minutes). If you wish to take the bus, go to the ‘안내 데스크(information center)’ after arrival and ask for the bus terminal:

    시외버스 터미널에 어떻게 가나요?
    sioebeoseu teomineore eotteokke ganayo?
    “How do I get to the intercity bus terminal?”

    If you wish to go by taxi, it will take approximately 49 minutes and the fare will likely come up to somewhere between ‘6만5천원-8만원(65,500won-80,000won, or approximately 60-75 dollars), so looking for someone to share the taxi with may be an option.

    If you want to take a taxi, ask the driver if he/she is willing to take you to PyeongChang by asking:

    평창까지 가주실 수 있나요?
    PyeongChangkkaji gajusil su innayo?
    “Could you take me to PyeongChang?”

    Buying Tickets

    2. Buying Tickets

    Although the Olympics are less than one month away, tickets are still available for purchase. However, as the options for purchasing the tickets vary depending on the country you are coming from, you may want to check the PyeongChang Olympics official website for details.

    If you wish to purchase tickets directly at the venue, simply go to the ticket booth and ask whether they have tickets available for the day by inquiring:

    혹시 오늘 경기 표 살 수 있나요?
    hoksi oneul gyeonggi pyo sal su innayo?
    “Is it possible to buy tickets for today’s game?”

    If you want to buy tickets for another day:

    “다른 날 표 살 수 있나요?”
    dareun nal pyo sal su innayo?
    “Could I buy tickets for another day?”

    If you would like to ask if there are tickets for other events, you could ask:

    “다른 경기 표는 없나요?”
    dareun gyeonggi pyoneun eomnnayo?
    “Are there tickets for other games?”
    If you bought tickets already and want to receive at the ticket booth:

    “인터넷으로 표 샀는데 지금 받을 수 있을까요?”
    Inteoneseuro pyo sanneunde jigeum badeul su isseulkkayo?
    “I bought tickets online. Can I get them now?”

    Location of Stadiums

    3. Location of Stadiums

    There are 13 venues where the events will take place, with the Games gathering around the two main venues–the mountain resort of ‘알펜시아’(Alpensia: for outdoor sports such as skiing and bobsled, and the coastal city of ‘강릉’(Gangneung) for indoor sports such as hockey, curling and figure skating.

    PYEONGCHANG 2018 VENUESSource: architectureofthegames.net

    4. Accommodations

    Once you have made it to PyeongChang, you will likely need to check in. To confirm your reservation, you may need to ask:

    “체크인 하고 싶은데요.”
    chekeuin hago sipeundeyo.
    “I’d like to check in.”

    If you want to ask if breakfast is included, you could ask:

    “조식도 포함되나요?”
    josikdo pohamdoenayo?
    “Is breakfast included?”

    Accommodations

    If you wish to ask for help, the concierge at the hotel/resort you are staying at will probably know the best places to eat, or be able to give directions to get to the stadium. Here are some phrases that you could use to ask for help:

    “도움을 받고 싶은데요.”
    doumeul batgo sipeundeyo.
    “I’d like some help.”

    “맛있는 식당 추천 해주세요.”
    Massineun sikdang chucheon haejuseyo.
    “Please recommend a delicious restaurant.”

    “___ 경기장에 가고 싶은데 택시를 불러주세요.”
    ___ gyeonggijange gago sipeunde taeksireul bulleojuseyo.
    “I’d like to go to the ___ stadium, please call me a taxi.”

    “___ 경기장에 가고 싶은데 어떻게 가야 하나요?”
    gyeonggijange gago sipeunde eotteokke gaya hanayo?
    “I’d like to go to the ___ stadium, how do I get there?”

    5. Souvenirs

    PYEONGCHANG 2018 VENUESSource: wikipedia

    If you wish to bring back a souvenir from the Olympics, why not the mascots of the Games? There are two official ‘마스코트(masukoteu)-”mascots”’ for the games–’수호랑’(Soohorang) and ‘반다비’(Bandabi)–Soohorang is a white tiger and Bandabi is an Asiatic black bear.

    There is an official online store with cute character items that range from water bottle holders to indoor slippers.

    ‘평창 롱패딩’(pyeongchang longpaeding)-”Long padded coats” are also available and selling like hotcakes at 롯데백화점(loddebaeghwajeom)=”Lotte Department Store”, the official sales partner of the Olympics, so going to the department store may be a good way to get not just souvenirs, but other popular Korean products such as ‘페이셜 팩’(peisyeol paek)=”facial masks”, ‘화장품’(hwajangpum)=”cosmetics”), or ‘김’(gim)=”seaweed snacks”.

    Also, don’t forget to download your free cheat sheet - Survival Phrase List for PyeongChang Olympics 2018 - below. (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - PyeongChang Olympics 2018

    6. Where to Enjoy the Games–even if You’re not in PyeongChang

    If you don’t have the time to actually visit PyeongChang, one good option would be to go to a local pub and enjoy the games–some fun areas in Seoul include ‘이태원’(Itaewon) and ‘홍대’(Hongdae)–there are various bars and pubs which will likely have sign posts showing that they will be showing the games ‘라이브’(laibeu)=”real time”–walk around until you see a pub you fancy–then just walk in, order a glass of beer and cheer for your country or favorite player!

    7. Fun Facts about the PyeongChang Olympics

    • This is the first Winter Olympics hosted by Korea.
    • To avoid confusion with the North Korean capital Pyongyang, the PyeongChang resort changed its name by capitalizing the ‘C’.
    • This was Korea’s third attempt to host the Winter Olympics–PyeongChang lost by just three votes to Vancouver for the 2010 Olympics, and four votes to Sochi for the 2014 Games.
    • A record 102 medals will be awarded in 15 disciplines.

    The Top 10 Korean Words & Phrases For Going On A Date

    The Top 10 Words You'll Need For A Date!

    Hey Listeners!

    Summer is here and love is in the air! But are you going to be able to go on that date with that special someone… who only speaks Korean?!

    Step up your game with our Top 10 Korean words and phrases for going on a date! And don’t forget to sign up for a FREE (Yes, it’s a FREE account) lifetime account at KoreanClass101.com to further your skills even more!

    Start Learning Korean Today!

    1. I love you.
    사랑해요. (Saranghaeyo.)

    2. You’re so beautiful.
    정말 아름다우세요. (Jeongmal areumdauseyo.)

    3. Rose
    장미 (jangmi)

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    4. Kiss
    키스 (kiseu)

    5. I think of you as more than a friend.
    나는 너를 친구 이상으로 생각해. (Naneun neoreul chingu isangeuro saenggakae.)

    Click Here To Learn Korean!

    6. Love
    사랑 (sarang)

    7. I’ve got a crush on you.
    나는 너에게 반했어. (Naneun neoege banhaeseo.)

    8. Date
    데이트 (deiteu)

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    9. Heart
    하트 (hateu)

    10. We were meant to be together.
    우리는 천생연분이야. (Urineun cheonsaengyeonbuniya.)

    Still Want More? You’ll Find It All On Our Site! Sign Up For A FREE Lifetime Account Here! Yes. FREE, FREE, FREE!

    P.S. If you are in a really lovey dovey mood, check out some of these related word lists!
    1. Must-Know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
    2. 15 Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
    3. Must-Know White Day Vocabulary
    4. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
    5. The Top 10 Conversational Phrases In Korean

    The Top 5 K-Pop Songs To Learn Korean!

    Click Here To Start Learning Korean!

    Can you learn a language just by listening to music? Probably not.

    However, while it would be illogical to rely solely on music to learn a language, it can definitely help!

    This is true for learning Korean.

    Here are a few reasons why music CAN help you learn Korean:

    Click Here To Start Learning Korean Today!

    1. Music can help you remember!
    Ever had a song stuck in your head? Music stimulates memorization naturally. So while you’re singing your favorite Korean pop song every night before bed, you’ll be working on your language skills at the same time! How’s that for practicing Korean?

    2. Practice on the go!
    With modern technology, you can listen to music anywhere. The convenience of music is what makes it the perfect way to supplement your Korean language studies. On the bus, in a cafe, stuck in traffic…just turn on your car stereo or put on your headphones and go!

    3. Learn about the culture!
    This is one of the coolest things about listening to popular music from Korea. You’re able to dive in and experience a piece of the culture first-hand. By doing this, you can familiarize yourself with the current trends, slang, idols and actors of Korea!

    4. Bring life your studies to life!
    We all know that reading through notes can get boring, so why not spice up your studies a little? Music is fun and relaxing. Whether you want to dance on your bed to techno or unwind in your backyard to a soothing melody, nothing beats a study break that actually helps your studying.

    And without further ado, here are our five songs that will help improve your Korean:

    1. 2NE1 - I Love You

    Click Here To Start Learning Korean!
    2NE1 is one of the most popular K-pop groups around! Composed of three members, 2NE1 has been on the Korean music scene since 2009. The song I Love You features a smooth and catchy tune with a hook that is actually in English! This combination of Korean and English can be a great way for beginners to start learning through music.

    2. SHINee - Hello

    Click Here To Start Learning Korean!
    Similar to the previous song on the list, Hello also sports a simple English chorus. SHINee is one of the most respected boy bands in Korea, as well as Japan! This song is perfect for someone who is at a beginner level.

    3. EXO - 으르렁 (Growl)

    Click Here To Start Learning Korean!
    This song is sure to help intermediate and advanced learners. Don’t be surprised if the beat gets stuck in your head for days, it’s THAT catchy! Though some of the lyrics can get complex, the words are always spoken at an easy to follow pace!

    4. Girls’ Generation - Gee

    Click Here To Start Learning Korean!
    This light-hearted song is sure to lift up your spirits, as well as help you learn Korean! One of the older groups on this list, Girls’ Generation debuted in 2007. Gee is comprised of simple and cheery lyrics that anyone can enjoy!

    5. BIGBANG - Fantastic Baby

    Click Here To Start Learning Korean!
    BIGBANG might be the most popular group on the list and Fantastic Baby is one of their most popular songs. Like a few of the other songs on the list, English can be found in the lyrics, making it a comfortable track for beginners.

    Click Here To Start Learning Korean For FREE!

    6 Reasons to Learn a Language Before You Travel

    6 Reasons to Learn a Language Before You Travel

    There are plenty of destinations where you can get by with English, but sometimes you want to do better than just ‘get by’. Here are 6 reasons you should learn the basics of the language of your next trip destination.

    What are the 6 reasons you should learn the basics of the language of your next trip destination?

    1. You will be able to discover your destination better than other tourists.
    Getting by is one thing, but actually experiencing a trip abroad is quite another. No amount of guidebooks and online research can compensate for a basic lack of language ability. Speaking the language of your destination permits you to explore that destination beyond the regular tourist traps. Your language skills will not only allow you to dig into all the hidden gems of your destination, but they will also allow you to mingle with the locals to get a true experience on your holiday. Think of it this way: you’re not restricted to talking to the people at the tourist desk anymore.

    2. Knowing how to communicate with local police or medical personnel can be life-saving.
    Before you leave for your destination, make sure you learn how to ask for help in that destination’s local tongue. Do you know how to ask the waiter if this dish has peanuts in it? Or tell your host family that you’re allergic to fish? Can you tell the local doctor where it hurts? Moreover, an awareness of an environment improves your chance of remaining safe inside it. For example, walking around a busy marketplace, dazzled by an unfamiliar language, signs and accents will instantly render any tourist a more attractive mark for pickpockets. Communicating with other people, asking questions and looking confident will make you look like a semi-local yourself, and will ward off potential thieves.

    Click here for Korean Survival Phrases that will help you in almost every situation

    3. It helps you relax.
    Traveling is much less stressful when you understand what that announcement at the airport was saying, or if this bus line reaches your hotel. These things stress you out when traveling and they disappear when you understand the language. This allows you to focus on planning your trip in a better, easier way.

    Speaking the language can provide you with a way to get to know people you’d never otherwise have the opportunity to speak with.

    4. Speaking the language can provide you with a way to get to know people you’d never otherwise have the opportunity to speak with.
    Sometimes those relationships turn into friendships, and other times they’re nothing more than a lively conversation. Either way, as Nelson Mandela said: “If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.” When you approach someone – even staff at a store or restaurant – with English, rather than their own language, an invisible divide has already been erected. Making even a small effort to communicate in the language of the place you’re visiting can go a long way and you’ll find many more doors open up to you as a result.

    Click here for the Top 25 Korean Questions you need to know to start a conversation with anyone

    If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart.

    5. You’ll be a better ambassador for your country.
    If we’re honest with ourselves, we know very little about other countries and cultures, especially the local politics. And what we do know is often filtered to us by the media, which tends to represent only certain interests. When you can speak the local language, you’re able to answer questions that curious locals have about your country and culture. Are you frustrated with how your country is presented in global news? Are you embarrassed by your country’s leaders and want to make it clear that not everyone is like that where you’re from? This is a very good opportunity to share your story with people who have no one else to ask. We all have a responsibility to be representatives of the place we come from.

    6. Learning another language can fend off Alzheimer’s, keep your brain healthy and generally make you smarter.
    For more information, check out this blog post about the 5 Benefits of Learning a New Language.

    May is Family Month - Save 30%!

    The Month of May in Korea is often called Family Month. There’s Children’s Day, Parent’s Day, and Teacher’s Day. Korea takes Mother’s Day to a whole different level! On these days you give your Children, Parents and Teachers gifts to show them how much you appreciate them. Children often benefit the most with candy and money being popular gifts. Teachers get quite a lot of gifts as well as they have many students and parents to receive gifts from. And that’s why the month of May is called Family month in Korea!

    Well… did you learn something new about Korea?

    If you did, you’ll be glad to know that you’ll learn cultural tidbits in every single lesson at KoreanClass101.com! In every lesson, not only will you learn Korean that will have you speaking Korean in minutes, you’ll also learn cultural tidbits that will amaze your Korean friends! With KoreanClass101.com, you get ALL of your Korean needs; including the language and culture (it’s company policy)!

    We’re celebrating Family Month here at KoreanClass101.com by extending a steep discount for three days only. This offer is for those who would love to learn a little bit of Korean culture while learning Korean with fun and effective lessons!

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    한국어 재밌게 공부합시다!
    (Let’s have fun studying Korean!)

    Keith Kim
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    The Fastest, Easiest and Most Fun Way to Learn Korean

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