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10 Common Questions in Korean and How to Answer Them

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One of the most important language skills to attain is the ability to ask and answer different questions appropriately. This is because once you understand them, you’ll be able to hold conversations with native speakers of that language. 

Today, KoreanClass101 will introduce you to the ten most common questions and answers in Korean at different levels of speech. In Korea, there are many speech levels that you can utilize when conversing with people. There are three commonly used speech levels: formal (business level), formal, and informal.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Korean Table of Contents
  1. What is your name?
  2. Where are you from?
  3. Do you speak Korean?
  4. How long have you been studying Korean?
  5. Have you been to Korea?
  6. Do you like [country’s] food?
  7. What are you doing?
  8. What’s wrong?
  9. How much is it?
  10. How is…?
  11. Want to Learn More Korean? We Can Help You!

1. What is your name?

This is one of the first Korean questions any beginner should learn right away. Let’s have a look at three different ways to ask “What is your name?” in Korean. 

1. Formal Phrase – Business Level

성함이 어떻게 되세요? (Seonghami eotteoke doeseyo?) – “Could I have your name, please?”
성함이 어떻게 되십니까? (Seonghami eotteoke doesimnikka?) – “Could I have your name, please?”

성함 (seongham) is a formal word for 이름 (ireum), which is a noun for “name.” In business, it’s offensive to ask someone’s name using the word 이름(ireum), so we use 성함 (seongham) instead to show respect to the person we’re speaking to. 

Appropriate Answer – Business Level

제 이름은 Bob입니다. (Je ireumeun bobimnida.) – “My name is Bob.”

제 (je) is a humble way to refer to yourself. 이름은 (ireumeun) means “name is” and 입니다 (imnida) means “it is…”  

To answer with “My name is [name],” simply add your name between 이름은 (ireumeun) and 입니다 (imnida). This makes a complete sentence.

Example: 

  • 처음 뵙겠습니다. 성함이 어떻게 되십니까? 
    Cheoeum boepgetseumnida. Seonghami eotteoke doesimnikka?
    “Nice to meet you. What is your name?”
  • 제 이름은 윌슨입니다. 
    Je ireumeun wilseunimnida.
    “My name is Wilson.”

2. Formal Phrase – Conversational Level 

이름이 뭐예요? (Ireumi mwoyeyo?) – “What’s your name?”
이름이 어떻게 돼요? (Ireumi eotteoke dwaeyo?) – “What’s your name?” 

This sentence structure works exactly the same way as that of the formal phrase we just looked at. 

이름 (ireum) is “name” and 뭐예요? (mwoyeyo) and 어떻게 돼요? (eotteoke dwaeyo) mean “what is…” in Korean. You can use this phrase for everyday situations, such as speaking to complete strangers (e.g. cashier, receptionist, waiter, etc.) and building a relationship with someone you’ve just met (e.g. on a date, at school, etc.). 

Appropriate Answer

제 이름은 Bob입니다. (Je ireumeun bobimnida.) – “My name is Bob.”
제 이름은 Bob이라고 합니다. (Je ireumeun bobirago hamnida.) – “My name is Bob.”

The answer is exactly the same as the business level one. You can even skip 제 이름 (je ireum), or “my name,” as this is very common to do in conversations. 

Example: 

  • 이름이 뭐예요? 
    Ireumi mwoyeyo?
    “What’s your name?”
  • 제 이름은 마이클이라고 합니다. 
    Je ireumeun maikeurirago hamnida.
    “My name is Michael.”

3. Informal Phrase – Conversational Level 

이름이 뭐야? (Ireumi mwoya?) – “What’s your name?”
이름이 어떻게 돼? (Ireumi eotteoke dwae?) – “What’s your name?” 

You can use these phrases with various people, such as your friends and people who are the same age as you. However, it’s better to start off with a formal phrase when meeting someone for the first time, even if they’re the same age as you. It’s a way to show respect to each other. Eventually, one of you will request to talk informally, and from there, you can start talking to each other in a more casual manner. 

Appropriate Answer

Bob이야. (Bobiya.) – “I’m Bob.”

이야 (iya) means “it is” in Korean. Add your name before this word to complete the sentence. 

Example:

  • 이름이 뭐야? 
    Ireumi mwoya?
    “What’s your name?”
  • 앨리스야. 
    Aelliseuya.
    “I’m Alice.”

2. Where are you from? 

First Encounter

This is one of the most commonly asked questions that Koreans ask foreigners, usually to start a conversation with them. 

1. Formal Phrase 

어디 출신이세요? (Eodi chulsiniseyo?) – “Where are you from?”
어느 나라에서 왔어요? (Eoneu naraeseo wasseoyo?) – “Which country did you come from?”

어디 (eodi) and 어느 (eoneu) indicate a location. 출신 (chulsin) means “origin” and 나라 (nara) means “country.” Koreans use these phrases a lot, so try to memorize them. 

Appropriate Answer

일본에서 왔어요. (Ilboneseo wasseoyo.) – “I am from Japan.”
일본에서 왔습니다. (Ilboneseo wassseumnida.) – “I am from Japan.”

~에서 (~eseo) means “from~,” 왔어요 (wasseoyo) means “came,” and 왔습니다 (wassseumnida) means “come from.” Add the name of your country in Korean in front of ~에서 (~eseo) to complete the sentence. 

You can find a list of countries in Korean on our website; if you don’t know how to say your country in Korean, please check it out. 

Example: 

  • 어느 나라에서 왔어요? 
    Eoneu naraeseo wasseoyo?
    “Which country did you come from?”
  • 인도에서 왔습니다. 
    Indoeseo wassseumnida.
    “I am from India.”

2. Informal Phrase – Conversational Level 

어느 나라 사람이야? (Eoneu nara saramiya?) – “What is your nationality?”

어느 나라 (Eoneu nara) means “which country” and 사람 (saram) means “person.”

Appropriate Answer

일본에서 왔어. (Ilboneseo wasseo.) – “I’m from Japan.”

This sentence structure works exactly the same way as the one above: add the name of the country you want to say to the beginning of the sentence. 

Example: 

  • 어느 나라 사람이야? 
    Eoneu nara saramiya?
    “What is your nationality?”
  • 인도네시아에서 왔어. 
    Indonesiaeseo wasseo.
    “I’m from Indonesia.”
Two Businesswomen Shaking Hands

Do you speak Korean?

3. Do you speak Korean?

There are many Koreans who can speak English. They’ve been learning English as their second language since they were in primary school, and many of the younger generations spend years in English-speaking countries to become fluent. However, when you travel to very remote areas of South Korea, bilingual or trilingual Koreans will be a rarity. This can make it challenging for you to travel around, especially when it comes to purchasing train tickets or buying specific items. But you can always ask questions politely; it’s better than nothing!

Here are the Korean questions and answers you can use to find out what languages your interlocutor speaks, or let them know your current Korean level.

1. Formal Phrase 

한국어 할 수 있습니까? (Hangugeo hal su itseumnikka?) – “Do you speak Korean?”

할 수 있습니까? (Hal su itseumnikka?) means “Can you do ~?” in Korean. 

“English” is spelled 영어 (yeongeo), and “Can you speak English?” is 영어 할 수 있습니까? (Yeongeo hal su issseumnikka?). 

Do you want to know how to spell or say your language in Korean? Check out our list of the Top 38 Languages Spoken in the World on KoreanClass101.com.

Appropriate Answer

조금 할 수 있습니다. (Jogeum hal su isseumnida.) – “Yes, I speak a little.”
네, 잘 할 수 있습니다. (Ne, Jal hal su isseumnida.) – “Yes, I speak fluently.”
아뇨. 못 합니다. (Anyio. Mot hamnida.) – “No, I don’t.”

Example: 미국에 가본 적 있어

  • 불가리어 할 수 있습니까?
    Bulgariaeo hal su issseumnikka?
    “Can you speak Bulgarian?”
  • 아니요, 못 합니다. 
    Aniyo, mot hamnida.
    “No, I can’t.”

2. Informal Phrase – Conversational Level 

Here’s an informal way to ask the same question. 

영어 할 수 있어? (Yeongeo hal su isseo?) – “Do you speak English?”

Appropriate Answer

응, 조금 할 수 있어. (Eung, jogeum hal su isseo.) – “Yes, I speak a little.”
응, 할 수 있어. (Eung, hal su isseo.) – “Yes, I speak fluently.”
아니. 못해. (Ani. Mot hae.) – “No, I don’t.”

Example: 

  • 불가리어 할 수 있어? 
    Bulgariaeo hal su issseumnikka?
    “Can you speak Bulgarian?”
  • 응, 조금 할 수 있어. 
    Eung, jogeum hal su isseo.
    “Yes, I speak a little.”
Introducing Yourself

4. How long have you been studying Korean?

If you’ve been speaking Korean with your interlocutor, they may be curious how long you’ve been learning. Following are some simple Korean questions and answers you should learn and be prepared for! 

1. Formal Phrase 

한국어 공부한지 얼마나 됐어요? (Hangugeo gongbuhanji eolmana dwaesseoyo?) – “How long have you been studying Korean?”

한국어 공부한지 오래됐어요? (Hangugeo gongbuhanji oraedwaesseoyo?) – “Have you been studying Korean for a long time?”

얼마나 됐어요? (Eolmana dwaesseoyo?) means “How long has it been since~” and 오래됐어요? (Oraedwaesseoyo?) means “Has it been long since~” in Korean. 

To ask about a different language, just add the appropriate word in front of 공부한지 (gongbuhanji) to complete the sentence. 

Appropriate Answer

#년/개월/달 됐어요. (#nyeon/gaewol/dal dwaesseoyo.) – “It’s been #year/month/month.”

한국어 공부한지 얼마 되지 않았어요. (Hangugeo gongbuhanji eolma doeji anasseoyo.) – “It has not been long since I studied Korean.”

한국어 공부한지 좀 됐어요. (Hangugeo gongbuhanji jom dwaesseoyo.) – “It’s been awhile since I’ve been studying Korean.” 

There are various ways to answer this question, and it’s your time to shine. Usually, Koreans don’t appreciate it when someone brags about themselves, so find a way to answer humbly. 

년 (nyeon) means “year.” 개월 (gaewol) and 달 (dal) mean “month(s).”

한국어 공부한지 얼마 되지 않았어요 (Hangugeo gongbuhanji eolma doeji anasseoyo) literally means “It has not been long since I studied Korean,” though it’s also a humble way to express that you’re fluent in Korean, but don’t want to show off your skills. 

Example: 

  • 한국어 공부한지 얼마나 됐어요? 
    Hangugeo gongbuhanji eolmana dwaesseoyo?
    “How long has it been since you started studying Korean?”
  • 한국어 공부한지 1년 됐어요. 
    Hangugeo gongbuhanji ilnyeon dwaesseoyo.
    “It has been a year since I started studying Korean.”

2. Informal Phrase – Conversational Level 

한국어 공부한지 얼마나 됐어? (Hangugeo gongbuhanji eolmana dwaesseo?) – “How long have you been studying Korean?”

한국어 공부한지 오래됐어? (Hangugeo gongbuhanji oraedwaesseoyo?) – “Have you been studying Korean for a long time?”

There’s not much difference, except that the polite form 요 (yo) is removed. 

Appropriate Answer

#년/개월/달 됐어. (#nyeon/gaewol/dal dwaesseo.) – “It’s been #year/month/month.”

한국어 공부한지 얼마 되지 않았어. (Hangugeo gongbuhanji eolma doeji anasseo.) – “It has not been long since I studied Korean.”

한국어 공부한지 좀 됐어. (Hangugeo gongbuhanji jom dwaesseoyo.) – “It’s been awhile since I’ve been studying Korean.” 

There’s not much difference, except that the polite form 요 (yo) is removed. 

Example: 

  • 한국어 공부한지 얼마나 됐어? 
    Hangugeo gongbuhanji eolmana dwaesseo?
    “How long have you been studying Korean?”
  • 한국어 공부한지 좀 됐어. 한 4년 됐나? 
    Hangugeo gongbuhanji jom dwaesseoyo. Han sanyeon dwaenna?
    “It’s been awhile. About four years?”
Someone Holding a Book of Travel Records with a Globe Nearby

Have you been to Korea?

5. Have you been to Korea? 

The person you’re speaking with may be curious about what countries you’ve been to (or maybe you’re the one who’s curious!). Below are some basic questions and answers in Korean that will be useful in a situation like this. 

1. Formal Phrase 

미국에 가본 적 있어요? (Miguge gabon jeok isseoyo?) – “Have you been to America?”
미국으로 여행한 적 있어요? (Migugeuro yeohaenghan jeok isseoyo?) – “Have you ever traveled to America?”

Appropriate Answer

“Yes I have” answers: 
네, 가본 적 있습니다. (Ne, gabon jeok isseumnida.) – “Yes, I have been.”
네, 여행한 적 있습니다. (Ne, yeohaenghan jeok isseumnida.) – “Yes, I have traveled [there].”
네, 가본 적 있어요. (Ne, gabon jeok isseoyo.) – “Yes, I’ve been there.”
네, 여행한 적 있어요. (Ne, yeohaenghan jeok isseoyo.) – “Yes, I have traveled [there].”

“No I haven’t” answers:
아니요, 가본 적 없습니다. (Aniyo, gabon jeok eopseumnida.) – “No, I have never been.”
아니요, 없습니다. (Aniyo, eopseumnida.) – Literally: “No, not.”

Example: 

  • 미국에 가본 적 있어요?
    Miguge gabon jeok isseoyo?
    “Have you been to America?”
  • 네, 가본적 있어요. 
    Ne, gabon jeok isseoyo.
    “Yes, I have.”

2. Informal Phrase – Conversational Level 

미국에 가본적 있어? (Miguge gabon jeok isseo?) – “Have you been to America?”
미국으로 여행한 적있어? (Migugeuro yeohaenghan jeok isseo?) – “Have you ever traveled to America?”

As you may have already guessed, informal phrases are exactly the same as the formal ones, except that the polite form 요 (yo) is removed from each sentence. 

Appropriate Answer

“Yes I have” answers: 
응, 가본적 있어. (Eung, gabon jeok isseo.) – “Yes, I’ve been there.”
응, 여행한 적 있어. (Eung, yeohaenghan jeok isseoyo.) – “Yes, I have traveled [there].”

“No I haven’t” answers:
아니, 가본 적 없어. (Ani, gabon jeok eopseo.) – “No, I’ve never been.”
아니, 없어. (Ani, eopseo.) – Literally: “No, there is not.”

응 (eung) is a casual, conversational word to say “yes” and 아니 (ani) is an informal way to say “no” in Korean. 

Example: 

  • 미국에 가본적 있어? 
    Miguge gabon jeok isseo?
    “Have you been to America?”
  • 아니, 가본적 없어. 
    Ani, gabon jeok eopseo.
    “No, I’ve never been.”

6. Do you like [country’s] food? 

This question is a great way to start a conversation, especially when you want to go to a restaurant. 

1. Formal Phrase 

태국 음식 좋아해요? (Taeguk eumsik joahaeyo?) – “Do you like Thai food?”

음식 (eumsik) means “food” and 좋아해요? (joahae?) means “I like~” in Korean. You can add any noun in front of 좋아해요? (joahaeyo?) to say “Do you like ~?” but let’s focus on food here. 

To ask about a country’s food, you need to write the name of the country, followed by 음식 (eumsik), meaning “food.” For example, if you want to say “Italian food,” then it would be 이탈리아 음식 (itallia eumsik). 

Appropriate Answer

네, 태국 음식 좋아해요. (Ne, taeguk eumsik joahaeyo.) – “Yes, I like Thai food.”
아니요, 태국 음식 좋아하지 않아요. (Aniyo, taeguk eumsik joahaji anayo.) – “No, I don’t like Thai food.”

Example: 

  • 비빔밥 좋아해요? 
    Bibimbap joahaeyo?
    “Do you like Bibimbap?”
  • 네, 좋아해요. 
    Ne, joahaeyo.
    “Yes, I like it.”

2. Informal Phrase – Conversational Level 

태국 음식 좋아해? (Taeguk eumsik joahae?) – “Do you like Thai food?”

Appropriate Answer

응, 태국 음식 좋아해. (Eung, taeguk eumsik joahaeyo.) – “Yes, I like Thai food.”
아니, 태국 음식 좋아하지 않아. (Ani, taeguk eumsik joahaji ana.) – “No, I don’t like Thai food.”

Example: 

  • 태국 음식 좋아해? 
    Taeguk eumsik joahae?
    “Do you like Thai food?”
  • 아니, 태국 음식 좋아하지 않아. 
    Ani, taeguk eumsik joahaji ana.
    “No, I don’t like Thai food.”
A Man Sneaking Up on a Woman and Covering her Eyes with His Hands

What on earth are you doing?

7. What are you doing? 

This is a useful question to know in any language. Here are a few ways you can ask and answer this question. 

1. Formal Phrase 

지금 뭐하세요? (Jigeum mwohaseyo?) – “What are you doing?”
뭐하고 계세요? (Mwohago gyeseyo?) – “What are you doing?”

지금 (jigeum) means “now,” and 지금 뭐하세요? (Jigeum mwohaseyo?) literally means “What are you doing right now?”

Do be careful of your tone when you say this, because it may also sound like “What on earth are you doing?!” in Korean. If you’re a big fan of Korean dramas, you’ve probably heard this phrase a lot. If you want to avoid ambiguity, stick to 뭐하고 계세요? (Mwohago gyeseyo?), or “What are you doing?” which sounds friendlier than the previous phrase. 

Appropriate Answer

지금 일하고 있어요. (Jigeum ilhago isseoyo.)  – “I’m working now.”
전화 하고 있어요. (Jeonhwa hago isseoyo.) – “I’m on the phone.”

There are two simple ways to answer: 

  • 지금 [noun]하고 있어요. (Jigeum ~ isseoyo.) – “I’m ~ing now.” 
  • [noun] 하고 있어요. ([noun]~ hago isseoyo.) – “I’m ~ing.”

To complete the sentence, all you need to do is add a noun to the middle of the sentence and at the beginning of the sentence, respectively. For example, if you want to say “I am swimming now,” “swim” is 수영 (suyeong) in Korean. So the full sentence becomes: 지금 수영하고 있어요. (Jigeum suyeonghago isseoyo.)

Example: 

  • 뭐하고 계세요? 
    Mwohago gyeseyo?
    “What are you doing?”
  • 지금 청소하고 있어요. 무슨 일 있어요? 
    Jigeum cheongsohago isseoyo. Museun il isseoyo?
    “I’m cleaning now. What’s going on?”

2. Informal Phrase – Conversational Level 

지금 뭐해? (Jigeum mwohae?) – “What are you doing right now?”
뭐하고 있어? (Mwohago isseo?) – “What are you doing?”

If you want to ask this question even more casually, you can say 뭐해 (mwohae), or “What are you doing?” 

Appropriate Answer

지금 [noun]하고 있어. (Jigeum [noun]~hago isseo.) – “I’m ~ing now.”
[noun]하고 있어. ([noun]~hago isseo.) – “I’m ~ing.”

The rules for constructing each sentence above are exactly the same as for the formal answers. 

Example: 

  • 뭐하고 있어? 
    Mwohago isseo?
    “What are you doing?”
  • 공부하고 있어. 무슨일 있어? 
    Gongbuhago isseo. Museun il isseo?
    “I was studying. What’s up?”

8. What’s wrong? 

This is such an important question to know, because you never know when your Korean friend will be sick or feeling down. Here are some ways to ask this question, and answer it. 

1. Formal Phrase 

무슨일 있어요? (Museun il isseoyo?) – “What’s up?”
왜 그래요? (Wae geuraeyo?) – “What’s wrong?”
무슨 일 있었어요? (Museun il isseosseoyo?) – “What happened?”
괜찮아요? (Gwaenchanayo?) – “Are you alright?”

There are various ways to check up on someone in Korean, but the four above are the most common.  

Also, to start a conversation, Koreans say: 얼굴색이 안좋아 보여요. (Eolgulsaegi anjoa boyeoyo.) The literal translation of the phrase is: “The color of your face does not look good.” It may sound strange or even offensive, but the phrase means “You don’t look well,” in English. 

So if a friend looks sad or seems ill, you can use this phrase followed by one of the “what’s wrong” questions above. 

Appropriate Answer

아무일도 없어요. (Amuildo eopseoyo.) – “I’m good (nothing is happening).”
괜찮아요. (Gwaenchanayo.) – “I’m okay.”

아, 그게 말이죠 (A, geuge marijyo…) – “Uh, actually…”
 사실은요 (sasireunyo) – “Actually”

There’s no fixed answer to “What’s wrong?” because you need to describe how you feel or what exactly happened to you. 

Example: 

  • 무슨 일 있어요? 
    Museun il isseoyo?
    “What’s up?”
  • 아, 그게 말이죠. 중요한 미팅이 취소가 되었어요. 
    A, geuge marijyo. Jungyohan mitingi chwisoga doeeosseoyo.
    “Oh, actually, an important meeting has been canceled.”

2. Informal Phrase – Conversational Level 

무슨일 있어? (Museun il isseo?) – “What’s up?”
왜 그래? (Wae geurae?) – “What’s wrong?”
무슨일 있었어? (Museun il isseoseo?) – “What happened?”

Appropriate Answer

어 그게… (Eo, geuge...) – “Uh…”
아 무슨일이 있었냐면… (A museuniri isseonnyamyeon…) – “Actually…” (connotes “Actually, what happened is that…”)

Example: 

  • 무슨일 있었어? 
    Museun il isseoseo?
    “What happened?”
  • 남자친구랑 헤어졌어.
    Namjachingurang heeojyeosseo.
    “I broke up with my boyfriend.”

9. How much is it?

If you enjoy shopping, this is one of the most important Korean questions for you to learn. Here are the different ways to ask and answer it. 

1. Formal Phrase 

가격이 어떻게 됩니까? (Gagyeogi eotteoke doebnikka?) – “What is the price of this/that?”
저건 얼마입니까? (Jeogeon eolmaimnikka?) – “How much is that?”
이건 얼마예요? (Igeon eolmayeyo?) – “How much is this?”

가격 (gagyeok) means “price.” 가격이 어떻게 됩니까? (Gagyeogi eotteoke doebnikka?) is the most humble way to ask for the price, and it’s commonly used in business environments. 저건 (jeogeon) means “that” and 이건 (igeon) means “this.”

Appropriate Answer

10,000원입니다. (Manwonimnida.) – “It’s 10,000 won.”
10,000원이에요. (Manwonieyo.) – “It’s 10,000 won.”

Check out these pages to learn how to say the price in Korean:

Example: 

  • 저건 얼마입니까?
    Jeogeon eolmaimnikka?
    “How much is that?”
  • 이거요? 15,000원이에요. 
    Igeoyo? Manocheonwonieyo.
    “This one? It’s 15,000 won.”

2. Informal Phrase – Conversational Level 

이건 얼만데? (Igeon eolmande?) – “How much is this?”
저건 얼마줬어? (Jeogeon eolmajwosseo?) – “How much did it cost?”

Probably the only time you would discuss the price of a certain item with someone the same age as you, such as a friend, would be after you purchased the item. These two sentences are common questions to ask a friend. 

Appropriate Answer

이거? 10,000원. (Igeo? Manwon.) – “This? 10,000 won.”
저거? 10,000원 주고 샀어. (Jeogeo? Manwon jugo sasseo.) – “That? I bought it for 10,000 won.”

Example: 

  • 저건 얼마줬어? 
    Jeogeon eolmajwosseo?
    “How much did it cost?”
  • 저 드레스? 25,000원 주고 샀어. 
    Jeo deureseu? Imanocheonwon jugo sasseo.
    “That dress? I bought it for 25,000 won.”
Man Asking How Are You?

10. How is…?

This is a common question structure in any language. Learn how to ask and answer this question in Korean! 

1. Formal Phrase 

어떻게 지내요? (Eotteoke jinaeyo?) – “How are you?”
잘 지내고 있어요? (Jal jinaego isseoyo?) – “How have you been doing?”

These two sentences are commonly used to ask someone how he or she has been doing. If you want to specify the subject, you can add it in front of each sentence. For example, “How is your dog?” is 강아지 잘 지내고 있어요? (Gangaji jal jinaego isseoyo?) in Korean. 

Appropriate Answer

네, 잘 지내고 있어요. (Ne, jal jinaego isseoyo.) – “Yes, I’m doing well.” 
요즘 ~ (yojeum) “~these days”
아니요, 잘 못 지내고 있어요. (Aniyo, jal mot jinaego isseoyo.) – “No, I’m not doing well these days.” 

Example: 

  • 잘지내고 있어요? 
    Jal jinaego isseoyo?
    “How have you been doing?”
  • 그럼요, 잘 지내고 있어요. 
    Geureomyo, jal jinaego isseoyo.
    “Of course, I’m doing well.”

2. Informal Phrase – Conversational Level 

어떻게 지내? (Eotteoke jinae?) – “How are you?”
잘 지내고 있어? (Jal jinaego isseo?) – “How have you been doing?”

Appropriate Answer

응, 잘 지내고 있어. (Eung, jal jinaego isseo.) – “Yes, I’m doing well.” 
아니, 잘 못 지내고 있어. (Ani, jal mot jinaego isseo.) – “No, I’m not doing well these days.” 

Example: 

  • A: 잘지내고 있어?
    Jal jinaego isseo?
    “How have you been doing?”
  • B: 아니, 잘 못 지내고 있어.
    Ani, jal mot jinaego isseo.
    “No, I’m not doing well these days.”
  • A: 왜? 무슨 일 있어? 
    Wae? Museun il isseo?
    “Why? What’s wrong?”

11. Want to Learn More Korean? We Can Help You!

In summary, we’ve gone over ten different Korean questions and how to answer each question appropriately. We’ve also covered the different levels of speech that we could apply, depending on whom we’re talking to. Here are more web pages to help you learn different questions and answers in Korean. 

If you want to learn grammar and culture insights in detail, KoreanClass101.com is here for you. We have free study materials to help you improve your Korean language skills, and blog articles with practical Korean culture insights. Good luck in your studies! 

Before you go, why not practice right away? Leave us a comment with answers in Korean to some of the questions above. We look forward to hearing from you!

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The TOPIK Test: Tips for Getting a High Score

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TOPIK is the most popular Korean language proficiency test in the world. For those of you who don’t know much about the TOPIK Korean exam, you’ve come to the right place. In this article, we’ll provide you with tons of relevant and practical information about the test. If you’ve already decided to take the exam, you should stick around too. We’re going to give you lots of tips on how to get a high score on the TOPIK, and provide you with many free Korean study materials.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Study Strategies in Korean Table of Contents
  1. Korean Proficiency Tests
  2. Let’s Learn More About TOPIK
  3. A Look Inside the TOPIK Korean Test
  4. Tips for Your TOPIK Exam Practice
  5. Get Ready for TOPIK with KoreanClass101

1. Korean Proficiency Tests 

Let’s take a look at what Korean proficiency tests are available to Korean-learners. In Korea, there are two kinds of Korean language tests, which are: TOPIK (Test of Proficiency in Korean) and KLPT (Korean Language Proficiency Test). We’re going to focus only on TOPIK in this article, but it’s important to compare these two tests so you know which one is better-suited for you.

1) TOPIK (Test of Proficiency in Korean) 

  • TOPIK stands for “Test of Proficiency in Korean
  • The Korean Institute for Curriculum and Evaluation 9KICE conducts these tests 
  • The test is evaluated in five main categories, which are:
    • Vocabulary
    • Grammar
    • Writing
    • Listening
    • Reading
  • TOPIK offers two different tests, which are:
    • S-TOPIK (Standard Korean)
    • B-TOPIK (Business Korean) 
  • TOPIK testing takes place twice per year (in April and September)

2) KLPT (Korean Language Proficiency Test)

  • The Korean Language Society conducts these tests 
  • The test is evaluated in five categories, which are:
    • Listening 
    • Vocabulary
    • Grammar
    • Reading
    • Conversation 
  • KLPT offers two different tests, which are:
    • KLPT
    • B-KLPT (Beginners’ KLPT) 

2. Let’s Learn More About TOPIK

Language Skills

Foreigners may take TOPIK tests for various reasons. If you’re planning to stay in Korea for an extended period of time, you should consider obtaining the highest TOPIK level. There are two levels for TOPIK: TOPIK I (the basic level test) and TOPIK II (the combination of intermediate and advanced levels). The evaluation is based on the total number of points earned.

1) What Can You Do with Your TOPIK Scores?

Test-takers register for the TOPIK exam for various reasons:

  • To enter a Korean university as a foreigner
  • To obtain a work visa for a company in Korea
  • To obtain a marriage-based immigrant visa
  • To apply for permanent residency

As you can see, one’s TOPIK results can have many practical benefits and uses! 

2) TOPIK Levels & Their Passing Scores

TOPIK I has two levels, which are Level 1 and Level 2. In order to pass Level 1, you need to attain 80 points; for Level 2, you need to attain 140 points. 

As for TOPIK II, there are four levels: Level 3, Level 4, Level 5, and Level 6. The passing marks are 120 points, 150 points, 190 points, and 230 points, respectively.

3) What Does the Exam Structure Look Like?

SectionDurationQuestionsMarksSession
TOPIK I (Levels 1-2)Listening40 min301001st session
Reading60 min40100
TOPIK II(Levels 3-6)Listening60 min501001st session
Writing50 min4100
Reading70 min501002nd session

4) How to Register for the TOPIK Test

If you reside in Korea, you can register for the test online through the official TOPIK website. The registration fee costs 35,000 KRW for TOPIK I (Levels 1 and 2) and 40,000 KRW for TOPIK II (Levels 3-6). You can pay with your debit or credit card, through online banking, or using a direct bank transfer.

If you’re from another country, you can register for the test at the Korean embassies or Korean culture centers. For registration, you’ll be required to bring two passport-size photographs and the registration fee. Note that the fee varies from country to country, so it’s important to research in advance.

A Man Listening to a TOPIK Listening Test.

3. A Look Inside the TOPIK Korean Test

Now that you know how to register, what the TOPIK tests you on, and other essential information, let’s go over what you can expect from each portion of the test.  

1- Introduction to the TOPIK Listening Section 

What is the TOPIK listening section like, and how can you score higher marks here?

1. What Type of Tasks?

These are some sample questions that you can expect to see in the TOPIK listening test. 

  • Listen to the audio and choose the appropriate picture (2 points)
  • Listen to the dialogue and choose what the speaker (e.g. woman) is going to do next (2 points)
  • Listen to the audio and choose the appropriate topic (2 points) 
  • Choose the answer that matches with the content of the dialogue (2 points) 

2. Tip for a Higher Score

Read the Question and Answers First

As soon as you open the test book, read through the questions and answers. This way, you’ll have a sense of what kind of audio will be played, and if you understand the questions and answers, it will be easier for you to spot the correct answer right away. While the audio is being played, you won’t have enough time to think and go through each answer.

3. Questions from the Past TOPIK Exams

Here are some example questions from past TOPIK exams so you can get a good idea of what to expect. 

1. TOPIK 60 I – listening exercise

2. TOPIK 60 II – listening exercise

3. TOPIK 60 I – listening exercise

4. TOPIK 60 II – listening exercise

Want to have fun while practicing your listening? Check out these pages on KoreanClass101.com:

A lLady Studying Korean on the Bus

2- Introduction to the TOPIK Reading Section

Now, let’s take a look at the TOPIK reading section and how you can ace this portion of the test. 

1. What Type of Tasks?

These are some sample questions that you can expect to see in the TOPIK reading test. 

  • Read the sentence and choose the topic (2 points)
  • Read the sentences and choose the appropriate word that goes inside the () (2 points)
  • Read the information (e.g. pamphlet) and choose the information that is not correct (3 points)
  • Read the sentence and choose the answer that matches with the topic (3 points)
  • Read the paragraph and choose the appropriate word that goes inside the () (2~3 points)
  • Read 4 sentences and choose the answer that is chronologically arranged (2~3 points)

2. Tip for a Higher Score

Try to Make Sense out of the Words You Know 

If you struggle to understand Korean phrases, it’s normal to feel stressed. But don’t let your stress take over. If the section you’re reading is too long and you can’t understand what’s written, just look for words you do understand and try to make sense out of them. Don’t forget to read the questions and multiple choices so that when you’re reading, you can remind yourself about what information to look for.

3. Questions from the Past TOPIK Exams

1) TOPIK 60

무엇에 대한 이야기입니까? <보기>와 같이 알맞은 것을 고르십시오. (각 2점)
mueose daehan iyagiimnikka? wa gachi almajeun geoseul goreusipsio. (gak 2jeom)
“What is the topic about? Select the answer that appropriately describes . (2 points per question)”

바람이 붑니다. 시원합니다.
barami bumnida. Siwonhamnida.
“The wind is blowing. It is cool.”

① 과일 ② 사람 ③ 날씨 ④ 얼굴
gwail saram nalssieolgul
① “fruit” ② “human” ③ “weather” ④ “face”
저는 일본에서 왔습니다. 친구는 미국에서 왔습니다.
jeoneun ilboneseo watseumnida. chinguneun migugeseo watseumnida.
“I come from Japan. My friend comes from America.”

① 음식 ② 나라 ③ 요일 ④ 선물
eumsik nara yoil seonmul
① “food” ② “country” ③ “day” ④ “gift”
2) TOPIK 47

다음의 내용과 같은 것을 고르십시오.
daeumui naeyonggwa gateun geoseul goreusipsio.
“Select the answer that has the same context as the sentences.”

저는 오늘 이사를 했습니다. 친구가 도와줘서 이사가 금방 끝났습니다.
jeoneun oneul isareul haetseumnida. chinguga dowajwoseo isaga geumbang kkeunnatseumnida.
“I moved in today. I could finish the moving-in quickly because a friend helped me out.”

새집에서 친구와 저녁을 먹었습니다.
saejibeseo chinguwa jeonyeogeul meogeotseumnida.
“I had dinner with a friend at a new house.”

① 친구가 이사를 했습니다. 
chinguga isareul haetseumnida.
① “A friend moved in.”

② 제가 친구를 도와줬습니다. 
jega chingureul dowajwotseumnida.
② “I helped a friend moving.”

③ 지난주에 이사를 했습니다. 
jinanjue isareul haetseumnida.
③ “I moved to a new place last week.”

④ 이사한 집에서 식사를 했습니다.
isahan jibeseo siksareul haetseumnida.
④ “I ate some dishes at a new house.”

3) TOPIK 37

다음을 읽고 물음에 답하십시오.
daeumeul ilgo mureume dapasipsio.
“Read the passage below and answer the questions.”

저는 자기 전에 하루를 정리하면서 메모를 합니다.
jeoneun jagi jeone harureul jeongnihamyeonseo memoreul hamnida.
“I summarize what I did each day by writing them down in a note.”

먼저 오늘 일어난 일 중에서 잘 한 일 세 가지를 씁니다.
meonjeo oneul ireonan il jungeseo jal han il se gajireul sseumnida.
“Firstly, I write down three things that I did well.” 

그렇게 하면 힘든 하루를 조금 잊을수 있습니다.
geureoke hamyeon himdeun harureul jogeum ijeulsu itseumnida.
“If I do so, I can forget about the hard times of the day.”

그 다음에는 내일 할 일을 ( ㉠ ). 그러면 중요한 일을 잊어버리지 않아서 좋습니다.
geu daeumeneun naeil hal ireul ( ㉠ ). geureomyeon jungyohan ireul ijeobeoriji anaseo joseumnida.
“Next, I would (㉠) for things to do tomorrow. If I do this, I won’t forget about the important things, so it’s good.” 

이렇게 메모를 하면 생각만 할 때보다 하루 하루를 훨씬 더 잘 정리할 수 있습니다.
ireoke memoreul hamyeon saenggangman hal ttaeboda haru harureul hwolssin deo jal jeongnihal su itseumnida.
“If you take notes like this, you can organize your day much better than you think.”

Q. ㉠에 들어갈 알맞은 말을 고르십시오.(2점)
Q. ㉠e deureogal almajeun mareul goreusipsio.(2jeom)
Q. Please choose the appropriate answer for ㉠. (2 points)

① 적어 봅니다
jeogeo bomnida
① “write down”

② 적게 됩니다
jeokge doemnida
② “being written down”

③ 적을까 합니다
jeogeulkka hamnida
③ “maybe write down”

④ 적을 것 같습니다
jeogeul geot gatseumnida
④ “might write down”

Q. 이 글의 내용과 같은 것을 고르십시오.(3점)
Q. i geurui naeyonggwa gateun geoseul goreusipsio.(3jeom)
Q. Choose the answer that has the same meaning as the written context. (3 points)

① 하루의 잘못한 일을 써서 정리합니다.
haruui jalmothan ireul sseoseo jeongnihamnida.
① “Summarize things that the author did wrong.”

② 아침에 일어나서 오늘 할 일을 씁니다.
achime ireonaseo oneul hal ireul sseumnida.
② “Write down things to do for the day in the morning.”

③ 잊어버린 일들은 자기 전에 메모합니다.
ijeobeorin ildeureun jagi jeone memohamnida.
③ “Write down things that the author forgot in a note.”

④ 메모를 하면서 하루의 일을 생각합니다.
memoreul hamyeonseo haruui ireul saenggakamnida.
④ “The author thinks about the day as he/she takes notes.”

It’s important to practice reading tests from the official TOPIK website. That way, you can get your hands on real tests and get a good idea of what the TOPIK reading section will be like. 

However, it’s also important to have fun while practicing your Korean skills. For a fun learning experience, why not check out the pages below? These are great for practicing your reading!

Three Students Taking a TOPIK Writing Exam

3- Introduction to the TOPIK Writing Section

Let’s take a look at the TOPIK writing section now. 

1. What Type of Tasks?

These are some sample questions that you can expect to see in the TOPIK writing test.

  • Listen to the conversation and choose the appropriate answer from the multiple choices (3~4 points)
  • Listen to the conversation and choose the location of the two speakers (3~4 points)
  • Listen to the conversation and choose the topic of the conversation (3~4 points)
  • Listen to the conversation and choose the right picture (4 points)
  • Listen and choose the answer that describes the situation (3 points)

2. Tips for a Higher Score

Read the Question Carefully

Before you do anything, make sure you know exactly what they expect you to write. Without understanding the question, you’ll end up writing answers that don’t relate to the question.

Think About What You Want to Say Before Writing 

When you begin composing your written answer, make sure that you outline your thoughts and ideas first, and only write about things you know and are familiar with.

Cross-Check Your Answer with the Question

Before moving forward, make sure that the answer you wrote matches up with the question, and that you’ve answered all of the questions.

3. Questions from the Past TOPIK Exams

1) TOPIK 26 
여러분은 “어디에서 살고 싶습니까? 왜 그곳에서 살고 싶습니까?” 그곳에 살면서 무엇을 하고 싶습니까? 여러분이 살고 싶은 곳에 대해서 쓰십시오.

yeoreobuneun “eodieseo salgo sipseumnikka? wae geugoseseo salgo sipseumnikka?” geugose salmyeonseo mueoseul hago sipseumnikka? yeoreobuni salgo sipeun gose daehaeseo sseusipsio.

“Where do you want to live? Why do you want to live in that place? What do you want to do while living there? Write about the place you want to live.”
2) TOPIK 29
여러분은 ¹토요일, 일요일에 보통 무엇을 합니까? ²어디에서 합니까? “누구하고 같이 합니까?” 여러분의 주말 이야기를 쓰십시오.

yeoreobuneun ¹toyoil, illyoire botong mueoseul hamnikka? ²eodieseo hamnikka? “nuguhago gachi hamnikka?” yeoreobunui jumal iyagireul sseusipsio.

“What do you normally do on Saturdays and Sundays? Where do you do it? With whom? Write down stories about your weekends.”
3) TOPIK 31
여러분은 ¹봄, 여름, 가을, 겨울 중 어느 계절을 좋아합니까? “그 계절은 어떻습니까?” 그 계절에는 보통 어디에 갑니까? *거기에서 무엇을 합니까? 여러분이 좋아하는 계절과 그 계절에 가는 곳에 대해 쓰십시오.

yeoreobuneun ¹bom, yeoreum, gaeul, gyeoul jung eoneu gyejeoreul joahamnikka? “geu gyejeoreun eotteoseumnikka?” geu gyejeoreneun botong eodie gamnikka? *geogieseo mueoseul hamnikka? yeoreobuni joahaneun gyejeolgwa geu gyejeore ganeun gose daehae sseusipsio.

“Among spring, summer, fall, and winter, which season do you like the most? What do you think about the season? Do you go anywhere special during that season? Write about your favorite season and the places that you go to during the season.”
4) TOPIK 34 
여러분은 ¹함께 여행하고 싶은 사람이 누구입니까? “왜 그 사람과 여행하고 싶습니까?” 그 사람과 함께 여행을 가서 무엇을 하고 싶습니까? 여러분이 함께 여행하고 싶은 사람에 대해서 쓰십시오.

yeoreobuneun ¹hamkke yeohaenghago sipeun sarami nuguimnikka? “wae geu saramgwa yeohaenghago sipseumnikka?” geu saramgwa hamkke yeohaengeul gaseo mueoseul hago sipseumnikka? yeoreobuni hamkke yeohaenghago sipeun sarame daehaeseo sseusipsio.

“Who do you want to travel with? Why do you want to travel with that person? What do you want to do with that person during the trip? Write about your ideal trip with that person.”

In order to achieve a good score for the TOPIK writing section, it’s important to practice your reading and writing together. Check out the pages below to practice your writing skills. 

4- Wait… Is There a Speaking Section?

TOPIK does not test your speaking skills. However, if you want to practice your speaking skills, we recommend that you have a look at the pages below. 

How to Improve Your Speaking Skills – Learn Korean sentences on how to improve your speaking skills

Secret Tips on How to Pass the TOPIK Exam

4. Tips for Your TOPIK Exam Practice

1) Study at a Korean Language School

Studying at a Korean language school will certainly help you improve your Korean skills in no time. This is because you’ll be working on homework and assignments every day, and everyone you meet in the class will have the same goal as you: to be fluent in Korean. If you surround yourself with people who have similar goals, it will motivate you to study more, and you and your friends can help each other, too!

2) Don’t Know the Answer? Don’t Hesitate to Use the Cross Method

Most of the tests, depending on the TOPIK level you’re taking, are multiple choice. If you’re unsure of which answer to choose, try eliminating the answers you think are incorrect. In the end, you’re more likely to narrow down the correct answer.

3) Relax! 

The more you think about how much time is left, the more poorly you’ll do on the test. If you think that certain questions may take more time than the others, just set them aside and move onto the next question. You can always come back to them later.

4) Listen to Korean Dramas or Music in Your Spare Time

Studying only with books can be tiring and boring. Learning Korean should be fun, too. In your spare time, you can actually learn Korean by watching Korean dramas with subtitles or listening to Korean music to practice your listening skills. You can even challenge yourself by mimicking words or phrases you hear.

Someone Climbing the Ladder of Success

5. Get Ready for TOPIK with KoreanClass101

We hope you now have a better understanding of what to expect from the TOPIK test and how to increase your chances of getting a great score. Is there anything we didn’t cover here that you want to know about? Do you feel more prepared for the TOPIK? Let us know in the comments! 

KoreanClass101.com offers free lessons online, and our goal is to make sure that you achieve your goal. We want you to succeed in your language-learning, and we’re here to help. So why not register today and receive free online study materials? 

Remember that in order to score a high mark for the reading section, you need to know many Korean words and have a basic understanding of Korean grammar. Without knowing the various grammar structures, you won’t do very well in other sections, either.

Here’s another list of resources for you to advance your Korean skills:

Vocabulary

You can also learn a new Korean word every day to keep your vocabulary skills sharp. Check out Korean Word of the Day for free subscription. 

Grammar

  • Basic Korean Grammar – Learn some simple tricks to understand Korean grammar.
  • Introduction to Korean Grammar – Whether you want to refresh your skills or learn new grammar structures, check out this page to practice basic Korean grammar. 
  • Idioms and Phrases – Koreans use a lot of idioms and phrases that you don’t get to see in study books. Learn some commonly used idioms and phrases here. 
  • Cheat Sheet to Mastering Korean – If you’re studying Korean on your own, you must check this out. It has twelve lessons and teaches you how to master Korean.

That’s it for now. We hope you get a high score on the TOPIK test. Good luck! 

  1. Happy: 4 or more
  2. Laughing: 1-2
  3. Pointing or gesturing (like showing something off or teaching): 2-3
  4. Sad: 1-2
  5. Shocked (different levels, like mild to super shocked): 3
  6. Angry: 2-3
  7. Neutral: 2-3
  8. Thinking (wondering) + (deciding) = 2
  9. Holding a pen or a learning object: 1
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Learn Basic Korean Sentence Patterns with KoreanClass101

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Have you ever wanted to say something in Korean, but you just couldn’t express it because you struggled to structure sentences in your head? 

We feel you. 

In fact, every language-learner will experience this at some point. But don’t worry anymore; as long as you master these basic Korean sentence patterns, you’ll be able to express yourself much more easily and generate hundreds of natural sentences with ease and confidence.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Korean Table of Contents
  1. Linking Two Nouns: “A is B.”
  2. Using Adjectives to Describe Nouns: “A is (Adjective)”
  3. Various Korean Sentence Structures to Express “Want”
  4. Various Sentence Patterns to Say You Like Something
  5. Politely Asking Someone to Do Something
  6. Asking for Permission
  7. Asking for Information About Something with “What is…”
  8. Asking About Location or Position: Where is …?
  9. Asking About Time: When is …?
  10. Study Korean with KoreanClass101.com

A Close-up Picture of a Red Apple

사과는 과일이에요. (Sagwaneun gwairieyo.) — “Apple is a fruit.” 

1. Linking Two Nouns: “A is B.” 

1. 사과는 과일이에요. (Sagwaneun gwairieyo.) — “Apple is a fruit.”

Rules:
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant:
(noun)은 (noun) 이에요. (iyeyo)
2. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a vowel: 
(noun)은 (noun) 예요. (yeyo)

Examples:

  • 이것은 레몬이에요. (Igeoseun remonieyo.) — “This is a lemon.” 
  • 이 아이는 학생이에요. (I aineun haksaengieyo.) — “This person is a student.” 
  • 존은 저의 친구예요. (Joneun jeoui chinguyeyo.) — “John is my friend.” 
  • 유미는 저의 여자친구에요. (Yumineun jeoui yeojachingueyo.) — “Yumi is my girlfriend.”
  • 이 분은 우리 어머니예요. (I buneun uri eomeoniyeyo.) — “This is my mother.”
  • 내 친구는 택시 드라이버예요. (Nae chinguneun taeksi deuraibeoyeyo.) — “My friend is a taxi driver.”
  • 이 시계는 우리 부모님이 주신 시계예요. (I sigyeneun uri bumonimi jusin sigyeyeyo.) — “My parents bought this watch.” 

2. 비빔밥은 한식이야. (Bibimbabeun hansigiya.) — “Bibimbap is a Korean food.” 

Rules:
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant: 
(noun)은 (noun) 이야. 
2. When the last syllable of the noun word ends with a vowel:
(noun)는 (noun) 이야.

Here’s a brief explanation of the Korean sentence rules above:

You want to say: “Alice is a person.” 

In Korean, “Alice” is written as 앨리스 (aelliseu) and “person” is 사람 (saram). 

The Korean sentence pattern for “A is B” is (noun)은 (noun) 이야

Let’s put each word inside the parentheses, making the full sentence: 앨리스는 사람이야 (Aelliseuneun saramiya).

Examples:

  • 존은 나의 친구야.  (Joneun naui chinguya.) — “John is my friend.”
  • 유미는 나의 여자친구야. (Yumineun naui yeojachinguya.) — “Yumi is my girlfriend.”
  • 이 분은 우리 어머니야. (I buneun uri eomeoniya.) — “This is my mother.”
  • 내 친구는 택시 드라이버야. (Nae chinguneun taeksi deuraibeoya.) — “My friend is a taxi driver.”
  • 이 시계는 우리 부모님이 주신 시계야. (I sigyeneun uri bumonimi jusin sigyeya.) — “My parents bought this watch.” 

Check out the Basic Korean Grammar page on our website for more basic Korean sentence structure practice.

A Little Kid Eating Ice Cream

이 아이스크림 너무 맛있어요. “This ice cream tastes great.” 

2. Using Adjectives to Describe Nouns: “A is (Adjective)”

Rules:
1. If the vowel is not ㅏor ㅗ, add 어요 (eoyo):
A은/는 Adjective어요.
2. If the vowel is ㅏor ㅗ, add 아요 (ayo):
A은/는 Adjective아요.

Examples: 

  • 이 요리는 맛있어요. (I yorineun masisseoyo.) — “This dish is delicious.” 
  • 앨리스는 키가 커요. (Aelliseuneun kiga keoyo.) — “Alice is tall.” 
  • 애드리언은 잘생어요.(Aedeurieoneun jalsaengeoyo.) — “Adrien is handsome.” 
  • 광희는 재미있어요. (Gwanghuineun jaemiisseoyo.) — “Gwanghee is funny.” 
  • 스마트폰은 빨라요. (Seumateuponeun ppallayo.) — “Smartphones are fast.” 
  • 이 사람은 말이 많아요. (I sarameun mari manayo.) — “This person talks a lot.” 

Want to learn more adjectives? Check out “Which Adjective Describes Your Personality Best?” and “Most Common Adjectives” on our website! 

A Woman Thinking a Lot

너무 많은것을 갖고 싶어요. “I want to have so many things!”

3. Various Korean Sentence Structures to Express “Want”

1. 인형을 갖고 싶어요. (Inhyeongeul gatgo sipeoyo.) — “I want to have a doll.”

When you want to have something, use this Korean sentence construction.

Rules: 
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant:
(noun) 을 갖고 싶어요. (~eul gatgo sipeoyo.)
2. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a vowel:
(noun) 를 갖고 싶어요. (~reul gatgo sipeoyo.)

Explanation: 

If you want to speak formally, end the sentence with 싶어요 (sipeoyo); if you want to speak informally, end the sentence with 싶어 (sipeo).

Examples: 

  • 게임기를 갖고 싶어. (Geimgireul gatgo sipeo.) — “I want to have a game console.”
  • 스마트폰을 갖고 싶어. (Seumateuponeul gatgo sipeo.) — “I want to have a smartphone.” 
  • 컴퓨터를 갖고 싶어요. (Keompyuteoreul gatgo sipeoyo.) — “I want to have a computer.” 
  • 한국 친구를 갖고 싶어요. (Hanguk chingureul gatgo sipeoyo.) — “I want to have Korean friends.” 

2. (이것을) 갖고 싶지 않아요. (igeoseul gatgo sipji anayo.) — “I don’t want to have this.”

When you don’t want to own something, or if you’re being forced to receive something from someone and want to express that you don’t want it, use this Korean sentence pattern.

Rules: 
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant:
(noun) 을 갖고 싶지 않아요. (~eul gatgo sipeoyo.)
2. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a vowel:
(noun) 를 갖고 싶지 않아요. (~reul gatgo sipeoyo.)

Examples: 

  • 아이를 갖고 싶지 않아요. (Aireul gatgo sipji anayo.) — “I don’t want to have a baby.” 
  • 이런것들은 갖고 싶지 않아요. (Ireongeotdeureun gatgo sipji anayo.) — “I don’t want to have these.”
  • 이런 작은 물건은 갖고 싶지 않아요. (Ireon jageun mulgeoneun gatgo sipji anayo.) — “I don’t want to have small objects like these.” 

3. 콜라를 마시고 싶어요. (kollareul masigo sipeoyo.) — “I want to drink a Coke.” 

Use this pattern to say that you want to do something.

Rules:
1. (verb) 하고 싶어요.(~hago sipeoyo.)
2. (verb) 하고 싶습니다. (~hago sipseumnida.) – Used in business

Examples: 

  • 맥주를 마시고 싶어. (Maekjureul masigo sipeo.) — “I want to drink a beer.”
  • 커피 마시고 싶어. (Keopi masigo sipeo.) — “I want to drink a coffee.”
  • 요리를 하고 싶어. (Yorireul hago sipeo.) — “I want to cook.”
  • 어디론가 여행을 하고 싶어. (Eodironga yeohaengeul hago sipeo.) — “I want to travel somewhere.”
  • 한국어를 공부하고 싶어. (Hangugeoreul gongbuhago sipeo.) — “I want to study Korean.”
  • 프로젝트를 진행하고 싶습니다. (Peurojekteureul jinhaenghago sipseumnida.) — “I’d like to continue the project.” 

4. 운동하고 싶지 않아. (undonghago sipji ana.) — “I don’t want to exercise.” 

To express that you don’t want to do something, use this expression.

Rules:
1. (verb) 고 싶지 않아요. (~go sipji anayo.) — informal
2. (verb) 고 싶지 않습니다. (~go sipji anseumnida.) — formal

Examples: 

  • 요리하고 싶지 않아요. (Yorihago sipji anayo.) — “I don’t want to cook.”
  • 자고 싶지 않아요. (Jago sipji anayo.) — “I don’t want to sleep.”
  • 공부하고 싶지 않아요. (Gongbuhago sipji anayo.) — “I don’t want to study.”
  • 결혼하고 싶지 않아요. (Gyeolhonhago sipji anayo.) — “I don’t want to get married.”
  • 법을 어기고 싶지 않아요. (Beobeul eogigo sipji anayo.) — “I don’t want to break the law.”

Check out “Learn How to Talk Out Issues/Problems and Explain Yourself” to practice Korean sentence patterns for expressing want.

A Bouquet of Roses

“I like roses.”

4. Various Sentence Patterns to Say You Like Something

1. 장미를 좋아해요. (Jangmireul joahaeyo.) — “I like roses.”

When you want to express that you like something, you use this type of sentence in Korean.

Rules:
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant:
(noun)을 좋아해요. (~eul joahaeyo.)
2. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a vowel:
(noun)를 좋아해요. (~reul joahaeyo.)

Examples: 

  • 김밥을 좋아해요. (Gimbabeul joahaeyo.) — “I like gimbap.”
  • 한식을 좋아해요. (Hansigeul joahaeyo.) — “I like Korean food.”
  • 너를 좋아해. (Neoreul joahae.) — “I like you.”
  • 김치를 좋아해. (Gimchireul joahae.) — “I like kimchi.”
  • 식혜를 좋아해. (Sikyereul joahae.) — “I like sikhye.”

2. 요리하는것을 좋아해요. (Yorihaneungeoseul joahaeyo.) — “I like to cook.”

When you want to talk about activities that you like doing, you can use this expression.

Rules: 
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant:
(noun)을 하는것을 좋아해요.
2. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a vowel:
(noun)를 하는것을 좋아해요.

Examples:

  • 사람들과 이야기를 하는것을 좋아해요. (Saramdeulgwa iyagireul haneungeoseul joahaeyo.) — “I like chatting with people.” 
  • 강아지와 함께 산책하는것을 좋아해요yo. (Gangajiwa hamkke sanchaekaneungeoseul joahae.) — “I like taking my dog for a walk.”
  • 홈스테이 어머니와 함께 한식을 만드는것을 좋아해. (Homseutei eomeoniwa hamkke hansigeul mandeuneungeoseul joahae.) — “I like making Korean dishes with my homestay mother.” 
  • 친구와 함께 원데이클래스를 하는것을 좋아해. (Chinguwa hamkke wondeikeullaeseureul haneungeoseul joahae.) — “I like taking a one-day class with my friend.” 

Check out “Learn About Talking About Likes and Interests” on KoreanClass101.com to practice how to say “I like Kimchi” in Korean! 

Sentence Patterns

5. Politely Asking Someone to Do Something

When you want to ask someone to do something for you, use this expression.

Rules:
1. ~해 주세요. (~hae juseyo.) — “Please do ~.”
2. ~해 주시겠어요? (~hae jusigesseoyo?) — “Can you please ~?”
3. 부탁 들어주세요. (Butak deureojuseyo.) — “Please do me a favor.”

Examples: 

  • 한국어로 번역해 주세요. (Hangugeoro beonyeokae juseyo.) — “Can you translate this in Korean?”
  • 러시아어로 통역해 주시겠어요? (Reosiaeoro tongyeokae jusigesseoyo?) — “Can you interpret in Russian?”
  • 제 부탁 하나만 들어주실래요? (Je butak hanaman deureojusillaeyo?) — “Could you do me a favor?”
  • 제가 어려운 부탁 하나만 드려도 될까요? (Jega eoryeoun butak hanaman deuryeodo doelkkayo?) — “Can I ask you a huge favor?”

Check out “Learn How to Use the Sentence Pattern “Could You Help…?” to practice more ways to ask someone for a favor. 

6. Asking for Permission

When you want to ask for permission from another person or want to know if it’s okay to do something, use this expression.

-아도 돼요? (~ado dwaeyo?)
-어도 돼요? (~eodo dwaeyo?)

Explanation: 

The easiest way to construct this sentence is to combine your desired action and permission phrase together. 

Let’s say that you want to go to the toilet and ask the teacher for permission.Your desired action is “to go to the toilet,” which is 화장실에 가요 (hwajangsire gayo). The phrase for asking someone for permission is 그래도 돼요? (Geuraedo dwaeyo?), meaning “Is it okay to do it?” By combining the two phrases, it becomes: 화장실에 가도 돼요? (Hwajangsire gado dwaeyo?). 

Let’s take a look at different examples. 

1) 집에 가요. + 그래도 돼요?
= 집에 가도 돼요?

2) 먹어요 + 그래도 돼요? 
= 먹어도 돼요?

Examples: 

  • 이 사진 봐도 돼요? (I sajin bwado dwaeyo?) — “Can I have a look at this picture?”
  • 오늘도 와도 돼요? (Oneuldo wado dwaeyo?) — “Can I come tomorrow, too?”

Want to practice asking people politely for permission? Check out these two pages from our website! 

A Woman Thinking

What is this called in Korean? 

7. Asking for Information About Something with “What is…” 

Here are some important Korean sentences to know if you need information about something.

1. 이것은 뭐예요? (Igeoseun mwoyeyo?) — “What is this?” [formal]

When you want to formally ask someone, such as a friend, about something you don’t know, you can use this expression.

Rules: 
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant:
(noun)은 뭐예요? (~eun mwoyeyo?)
2. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a vowel:
(noun)는 뭐예요? (~neun mwoyeyo?)

Examples: 

  • 이물건은 뭐예요? (Imulgeoneun mwoyeyo?) — “What is this object for?”
  • 저것은 뭐예요? (Jeogeoseun mwoyeyo?) — “What is this?”
  • 이 물건은 뭐예요? (I mulgeoneun mwoyeyo?) — “What is this stuff?”
  • 이름이 뭐예요? (Ireumi mwoyeyo?) — “What’s your name?”
  • 이메일 주소는 뭐예요? (Imeil jusoneun mwoyeyo?) — “What’s your email address?” 

2. 어제 숙제는 뭐였죠? (Eoje sukjeneun mwoyeotjyo?) — “What was the homework from yesterday?” [formal]

When you want to politely ask someone, such as a teacher or older sibling, about something you don’t know, or if you need to ask someone to recall an event, you can use this expression.

Rules:
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant:
(noun)은 뭐였죠? (~eun mwoyeotjyo?)
2. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a vowel:
(noun)는 뭐였죠? (~neun mwoyeotjyo?)

Examples:

  • 어제 같이 먹었던 음식 이름은 뭐였죠? (Eoje gachi meogeotdeon eumsik ireumeun mwoyeotjyo?) — “What was the name of the food we had yesterday?”
  • 어제 같이 봤던 영화 이름은 뭐였죠? (Eoje gachi bwatdeon yeonghwa ireumeun mwoyeotjyo?) — “What was the name of the film we watched yesterday?”
  • 어제의 뉴스에 나왔던 사고는 뭐였죠? (Eojeui nyuseue nawatdeon sagoneun mwoyeotjyo?) — “What was the news from yesterday all about?”

3.이거는 뭐야? (Igeoneun mwoya?) — “What is this?” [informal]

When you want to informally ask someone, such as a friend, about something you don’t know, you can use this expression.

Rules:
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant:
(noun)은 뭐야? (~eun mwoya?)
2. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a vowel:
(noun)는 뭐야? (~neun mwoya?)

Examples:

  • 저건 뭐야? (Jeogeon mwoya?) — “What is that?”
  • 이 물건은 뭐야? (I mulgeoneun mwoya?) — “What is this stuff for?”
    = 이 물건은 뭐에 쓰는 물건이야?
  • 이름이 뭐야? (Ireumi mwoya?) — “What’s your name?” 
  • 이단어 뜻이 뭐야? (Idaneo tteusi mwoya?) — “What is the meaning of this word?” 
A Map Showing Sheung Wan Station

Where is Sheung Wan station?

8. Asking About Location or Position: Where is …?

1. 화장실은 어디예요? (Hwajangsireun eodiyeyo?) — “Where is the bathroom?” [formal]

When you want to politely ask someone about locations, you can use this Korean phrase.

Rules: 
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant:
(noun)은 어디예요? (~eun eodiyeyo?)
2. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a vowel:
(noun)는 어디예요? (~neun eodiyeyo?)

Examples:

  • 엘리베이터는 어디예요? (Ellibeiteoneun eodiyeyo?) — “Where is the elevator?”
  • 고향은 어디예요? (Gohyangeun eodiyeyo?) — “Where is your hometown?”
  • 고속터미널역은 어디예요? (Gosokteomineollyeogeun eodiyeyo?) — “Where is the express bus terminal?”
  • 강남역 2번출구는 어디예요? (Gangnamyeok 2beonchulguneun eodiyeyo?) — “Where is the Exit 2 of Gangnam Station?” 
  • 예술의전당은 어디예요? (Yesuruijeondangeun eodiyeyo?) — “Where is the zoo?”

2. 교실은 어디야? (Gyosireun eodiya?) — “Where is the class?”

When you want to casually ask someone about locations, you use this phrase.

Rules: 
1. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a consonant:
(noun)은 어디야? (~eun eodiya?)
2. When the last syllable of the noun ends with a vowel:
(noun)는 어디야? (~neun eodiya?)

Examples:

  • 화장실은 어디야? (Hwajangsireun eodiya?) — “Where is the bathroom?”
  • 에스컬레이터는 어디야? (Eseukeolleiteoneun eodiya?) — “Where is the elevator?”
  • 서초역 1번 출구는 어디야? (Seochoyeok ilbeon chulguneun eodiya?) — “Where is the Exit 1 of Seocho Station?”
  • 이수역 2번출구는 어디야? (Isu ibeonchulguneun eodiya?) — “Where is Exit 2 of Isu Station?”

Check out “Learn About Gyeongbok Palace” to learn how to say “Where am I?” in Korean! 

Timetable of Flights

Timetable of flights

9. Asking About Time: When is …?

When you want to ask the time or the date/day of a specific event, you can use this phrase.

Rules:
1. 언제야? (eonjeya?) — “When is…?” [casual]
2. 언제예요? (eonjeyeyo?) — “When is …?”  [casual formal]
3. 언제입니까? (eun/neun eonjeimnikka?) — “When is …?” [formal]

Examples:

  • 생일은 언제야? (Saengireun eonjeya?) — “When is your birthday?”
  • 미팅은 언제예요? (Mitingeun eonjeyeyo?) — “When is the meeting?”
  • 비행기 도착시간은 언제입니까? (Bihaenggi dochaksiganeun eonjeimnikka?) — “When is the arrival time of the plane?”
  • 미팅은 언제부터 시작입니까? (Mitingeun eonjebuteo sijagimnikka?) — “When does the meeting start?” 
Sentence Components

10. Study Korean with KoreanClass101.com

Learning a new language takes time, and KoreanClass101.com will be here for you from start to finish. We provide free vocabulary lists and lessons for Korean learners, and there are many Korean native speakers eager to help you improve your Korean language skills. 

We hope that you found this article on beginner Korean sentences very useful. Come back anytime you need to study Korean sentence patterns, and feel free to reach out in the comments section with any questions. 

Good luck!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Korean

List of 100 Korean Adverbs

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According to YourDictionary, an adverb is a part of speech that describes either a verb, an adjective, or another adverb. They can also add description to phrases, clauses, or sentences.

Now, let’s see if you can spot an adverb in a sentence: 

오후 내내 자고 싶어요.
Ohu naenae jago sipeoyo.
“I want to sleep all afternoon.”

Were you able to spot the adverb? In that sentence, 내내 (naenae), which means “all through,” is the Korean adverb. If you couldn’t find it this time, don’t worry. Today, we’ll teach you how to make Korean adverbs three different ways, and show you a list of 100 frequently used Korean adverbs. 

By the end of the article, you’ll be able to: 

  • Detect Korean adverbs in sentences 
  • Know Korean adverb rules and how to construct each rule 
  • Study and learn 100 Korean adverbs and know when to use them
Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Useful Verbs in Korean Table of Contents
  1. Three Korean Adverb Rules That You Need to Know
  2. List of -이 (-i) Adverbs
  3. List of -게 (-ge) Conjugations
  4. List of -으로 (-euro) Adverbs
  5. List of Other Korean Adverbs
  6. List of Frequency Adverbs in Korean
  7. List of Korean Adverbs of Place
  8. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Your Korean Studies

1. Three Korean Adverb Rules That You Need to Know

Top Verbs

Now, let’s have a look at three different ways to make adverbs in Korean. 

1. -이 Adverbs

  • Rule: 
    • 하 (ha) in 하다 (hada) verbs becomes 히 (hi)

Examples:

Dictionary FormRomanizationAdverb FormRomanization
1) 신중하다sinjunghada신중히sinjunghi
2) 편하다pyeonhada편히pyeonhi

Let’s break it down.

Example 1: 

The verb 신중하다 (sinjunghada) becomes 신중히 (sinjunghi).

  • Step 1: Remove 하다 (hada) and replace it with 히 (hi).

Therefore, the meaning becomes “carefully” from the verb meaning “to be careful.”

Example 2: 

The verb 편하다 (pyeonhada) becomes 편히 (pyeonhi).

  • Step 1: Remove 하다 (hada) and replace it with 히 (hi).

Therefore, the meaning becomes “comfortably” from the verb meaning “to be comfortable.”

2. -게 Conjugations

 -게 adverbs are those that form from adjectives. 

  • Rule: 
    • Replace 다 (da) of the word stem with 게 (ge). 

Examples:

Dictionary FormRomanizationAdverb FormRomanization
1) 빠르다ppareuda빠르게ppareuge
2) 느리다neurida느리게neurige

Here’s how you create adverbs from adjectives in the dictionary form.

Example 1: 

The adjective 빠르다 (ppareuda) becomes 빠르게 (ppareuge).

  • Step 1: Remove 다 (da) and replace it with 게 (ge).

Therefore, the meaning becomes “quickly” from the dictionary form “quick.”

Example 2: 

The adjective 느리다 (neurida) becomes 느리게 (neurige).

  • Step 1: Remove 다 (da) and replace it with 게 (ge).

Therefore, the meaning becomes “slowly” from the dictionary form “slow.”

3. -으로 Adverbs 

으로 (euro) means “in some way.” Actually, it’s a postposition, not an adverb, but it becomes an adverb when you translate Korean into English. Most of the stems for 으로 (euro) adverbs use this suffix.

Dictionary FormRomanizationAdverb FormRomanization
1) 본능적bonneungjeok본능적으로bonneungjeogeuro
2) 이성적iseongjeok이성적으로iseongjeogeuro

Here’s how you conjugate the dictionary form to the adverb form.

Example 1: 

The adjective 본능적 (bonneungjeok) becomes 본능적으로 (bonneungjeogeuro).

  • Step 1: Add  으로 (euro) after 본능적 (bonneungjeok).

Therefore, the meaning becomes “instinctive” from “instinctual.”

Example 2: 

The adjective 이성적 (iseongjeok) becomes 이성적으로 (iseongjeogeuro).

  • Step 1: Add  으로 (euro) after 이성적 (iseongjeok).

Therefore, the meaning becomes “rationally” from “rational.”

Connecting Two Puzzle Pieces

2. List of -이 (-i) Adverbs 

To start our Korean adverbs list, let’s take a look at -이 (-i) adverbs. 

1. 대단히 (daedanhi), “greatly” 

Dictionary Form: 

Example:

  • 오늘 대단히 즐거웠어요.
    Oneul daedanhi jeulgeowosseoyo.
    “I greatly enjoyed our time today.”

2. 분명히 (bunmyeonghi), “clearly”

Dictionary Form: 

  • 분명하다 (bunmyeonghada), “to be clear”

Example:

  • 내 눈으로 분명히 봤다니깐?
    Nae nuneuro bunmyeonghi bwatdanikkan?
    “I saw it clearly with my own eyes!”

3. 솔직히 (soljikhi), “honestly, frankly” 

Dictionary Form: 

  • 솔직하다 (soljikada), “to be frank / honest / open” 

Example:

  • 묻는 말에 솔직히 대답해 주세요.
    Munneun mare soljiki daedapae juseyo.
    “Please answer me honestly.”

4. 순순히 (sunsunhi), “passively”

Dictionary Form: 

  • 순순하다 (sunsunhada), “to be passive / obedient”

Example:

  • 어제 그 범인은 범행 사실을 순순히 자백했다.
    Eoje geu beomineun beomhaeng sasireul sunsunhi jabaekaetda.
    “The suspect passively owned up to his crime yesterday.”

5. 열심히 (yeolsimhi), “zealously”

Dictionary Form: 

  • 열심 (yeolsim), “enthusiasm”

Example:

  • 제니는 오전 내내 열심히 일했다.
    Jenineun ojeon naenae yeolsimhi ilhaetda.
    “Jennie worked diligently (zealously) all morning.”

6. 완전히 (wanjeonhi), “completely”

Dictionary Form: 

  • 완전하다 (wanjeonhada), “to be complete”

Example:

  • 지난 레슨을 완전히 마스터 하기 위해 복습하세요.
    Jinan reseuneul wanjeonhi maseuteo hagi wihae boksseupaseyo.
    “Review old lessons to master them completely.”

7. 우연히 (uyeonhi), “by chance”

Dictionary Form: 

  • 우연하다 (uyeonhada), “to be accidental”

Example:

  • 우연히 전 남자친구를 만났다.
    Uyeonhi jeon namjachingureul mannatda.
    “I accidentally ran into my ex-boyfriend.”

8. 자세히 (jasehi), “in detail”

Dictionary Form: 

  • 자세하다 (jasehada), “to be detailed”

Example:

  • 좀 더 자세히 말씀해 주시겠어요?
    Jom deo jasehi malsseumhae jusigesseoyo?
    “Could you explain to me in detail?”

9. 천천히 (cheoncheonhi), “slowly”

Dictionary Form: 

There is no dictionary form for this word. 

Example:

  • 처음에는 대사를 천천히 읽으세요. 
    Cheoeumeneun daesareul cheoncheonhi ilgeuseyo. 
    “Read the lines slowly at first.”

10. 특별히 (teukbyeolhi), “especially”

Dictionary Form: 

  • 특별하다 (teukbyeolhada), “to be special”

Example:

  • 특별히 찾는 것이 있으십니까?
    Teukbyeolhi channeun geosi isseusimnikka?
    “Are you looking for anything in particular?”

“Are you looking for anything in particular?”

11. 확실히 (hwaksilhi), “certainly” 

Dictionary Form: 

  • 확실하다 (hwaksilhada), “to be certain” 

Example:

  • 영어는 확실히 어려운것 같아.
    Yeongeoneun hwaksilhi eoryeoungeot gata.
    “I think that English certainly is a hard language.”

12. 간단히 (gandanhi), “simply”

Dictionary Form: 

  • 간단하다 (gandanhada), “to be simple”

Example:

  • 그 문제는 간단히 풀 수 있어.
    Geu munjeneun gandanhi pul su isseo.
    “The problem can be solved easily.”

13. 끝없이 (kkeuteopsi), “endlessly”

Dictionary Form: 

  • 끝없다 (kkeuteopda), “endless”

Example:

  • 장미꽃이 끝없이 펼쳐져 있었다.
    Jangmikkochi kkeuteopsi pyeolchyeojyeo isseotda.
    “The rose field extended endlessly.”

14. 꼼꼼히 (kkomkkomhi), “carefully”

Dictionary Form: 

Example:

  • 일을 꼼꼼히 했으면 해요.
    Ireul kkomkkomhi haesseumyeon haeyo.
    “I wish you’d work more carefully.”

15. 엄격히 (eomgyeoki), “strictly” 

Dictionary Form: 

Example:

  • 엄격히 말하면 자신을 통제할 필요가 있는것 같아.
    Eomgyeoki malhamyeon jasineul tongjehal pillyoga inneungeot gata.
    “Strictly speaking, I reckon you need to control yourself.”

16. 신중히 (sinjunghi), “cautiously”

Dictionary Form: 

  • 신중하다 (sinjunghada), “to be cautious”

Example:

  • 신중히 생각하고 결정해.
    Sinjunghi saenggakago gyeoljeonghae.
    “Think carefully before making a decision.”

17. 간신히 (gansinhi), “barely”

Example:

  • 지금 간신히 먹고살 정도의 돈만 있어.
    Jigeum gansinhi meokgosal jeongdoui donman isseo.
    “I have barely enough money to live on.”
Files Ordered in Alphabetical Order

3. List of -게 (-ge) Conjugations

Now, let’s go through -게 (-ge) adverbs. 

18. 가볍게 (gabyeopge), “lightly”

Dictionary Form:

  • 가볍다 (gabyeopda), “to be light”   

Example:

  • 아빠가 딸의 볼에 가볍게 입을 맞추었어요.
    Appaga ttarui bore gabyeopge ibeul matchueosseoyo.
    “The father kissed his daughter lightly on her cheek.”

19. 나쁘게 (nappeuge), “badly”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 나를 나쁘게 생각하지 말아요.
    Nareul nappeuge saenggakaji marayo.
    “Don’t think badly of me.”

20. 늦게 (neutge), “late”

Dictionary Form:

  • 늦다 (neutda), “to be late”     

Example:

  • 미안, 내가 너무 늦게 전화했지?
    Mian, naega neomu neutge jeonhwahaetji?
    “I’m sorry. Am I calling too late?”

21. 맛있게 (masitge), “deliciously”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 오늘 친구들이랑 저녁을 맛있게 먹었어요.
    Oneul chingudeurirang jeonyeogeul masitge meogeosseoyo.
    “I ate dinner deliciously with my friends.”

22. 무례하게 (muryehage), “rudely”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 그 웨이터는 손님에게 무례하게 대했어요. 
    Geu weiteoneun sonnimege muryehage daehaesseoyo.
    “The waiter treated a guest rudely.”

23. 바쁘게 (bappeuge), “busily”

Dictionary Form:

  • 바쁘다 (bappeuda), “to be busy”     

Example:

  • 저희는 정말 바쁘게 살고 있어요.
    Jeohuineun jeongmal bappeuge salgo isseoyo.
    “We have a very busy life.”

24. 밝게 (balge), “brightly”

Dictionary Form:

  • 밝다 (balda), “to be bright”

Example:

  • 지수는 항상 밝게 웃는것 같아.
    Jisuneun hangsang balge unneungeot gata.
    “Jisoo always smiles brightly.”

25. 싸게 (ssage), “cheap [adv.]” 

Dictionary Form:

  • 싸다 (ssada), “to be cheap”     

Example:

  • 새 옷을 싸게 사고 싶어?
    Sae oseul ssage sago sipeo?
    “Do you want to buy new clothes cheap?”

26. 아름답게 (areumdapge), “beautifully”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 에바는 아름답게 노래하는것 같아.
    Ebaneun areumdapge noraehaneungeot gata.
    “I think that Eva sings beautifully.”

27. 안전하게 (anjeonhage), “safely”

Dictionary Form:

  • 안전하다 (anjeonhada), “to be safe”     

Example:

  • 밤에는 위험하니까 안전하게 운전해.
    Bameneun wiheomhanikka anjeonhage unjeonhae.
    “It’s dangerous at night, so please drive safely.”

28. 어렵게 (eoryeopge), “with difficulty [adv.]” / “the hard way [adv.]” 

Dictionary Form:

  • 어렵다 (eoryeopda), “to be difficult”   

Example:

  • 저 사람은 회사에서 어렵게 지금의 위치에 올랐어.
    Jeo sarameun hoesaeseo eoryeopge jigeumui wichie ollasseo.
    “He achieved his position the hard way.”

29. 이쁘게 (ippeuge), “prettily”

Dictionary Form:

  • 이쁘다 (ippeuge), “to be pretty”     

Example:

  • 그 여자는 듣기 좋게 웃었다.
    geu yeojaneun deutgi joke useotda.
    “She laughed prettily.”

30. 용기있게 (yonggiitge), “courageously”

Dictionary Form:

  • 용기있다 (yonggi itda), “to have courage”  

Example:

  • 우리는 용감하게 싸울 것이다.
    Urineun yonggamhage ssaul geosida.
    “We shall combat them courageously.”

31. 위험하게 (wiheomhage), “dangerously”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 앨리스는 위험한 생활을 즐긴다.
    Aelliseuneun wiheomhan saenghwareul jeulginda.
    “Alice enjoys living dangerously.”

32. 자연스럽게 (jayeonseureopge), “naturally”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 그 사람이랑 대화할 때는 항상 웃고 자연스럽게 행동해.
    Geu saramirang daehwahal ttaeneun hangsang utgo jayeonseureopge haengdonghae.
    “Always smile and act naturally when you talk to him.”

33. 자유롭게 (jayuropge), “freely”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 각각의 의견을 자유롭게 이야기 하세요.
    Gakgagui uigyeoneul jayuropge iyagi haseyo.
    “Feel free to share your opinions freely.”

34. 재미있게 (jaemiitge), “entertainingly”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 그 남자는 어린아이들이 재미있게 읽을수 있도록 쓰는데 재주가 있다.
    Geu namjaneun eorinaideuri jaemiitge ilgeulsu itdorok sseuneunde jaejuga itda.
    “The man has the gift of writing entertainingly for young children.”

35. 조용하게 (joyonghage), “quietly”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 야 민아, 조용하게 식사해줘.
    Ya mina, joyonghage siksahaejwo.
    “Hey Min, you should eat your food quietly.”

36. 즐겁게 (jeulgeopge), “pleasantly”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 옛날 이야기를 즐겁게 했어요.
    Yennal iyagireul jeulgeopge haesseoyo.
    “We talked pleasantly of old times.”

37. 크게 (keuge), “largely”

Dictionary Form:

  • 크다 (keuda), “to be large”  

Example:

  • 이번 문제는 크게 매니저에게 책임이 있다.
    Ibeon munjeneun keuge maenijeoege chaegimi itda.
    “The manager is largely responsible for the problem.”

38. 편리하게 (pyeollihagedo), “conveniently”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 우리 집은 편리하게 버스 정류장에서 가까워요.
    Uri jibeun pyeollihage beoseu jeongnyujangeseo gakkawoyo.
    “My house is conveniently near the bus stop.”

39. 편하게 (pyeonhage), “comfortably”

Dictionary Form:

  • 편하다 (pyeonhada), “to be comfortable”

Example:

  • 편하게 앉으세요. 
    Pyeonhage anjeuseyo.
    “Please sit comfortably.”

40. 행복하게 (haengbokage), “happily”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 그 두사람은 행복하게 오래오래 살았대.
    Geu dusarameun haengbokage oraeorae saratdae.
    “They lived happily ever after.”

41. 드물게 (deumulge), “rarely”

Dictionary Form:

  • 드물다 (deumulda), “to be rare”

Example:

  • 이 야채는 비싸서 슈퍼마켓에서 드물게 보인다. 
    I yachaeneun bissaseo syupeomakeseseo deumulge boinda.
    “This vegetable is expensive, therefore it is rarely seen at a supermarket.”

42. 조심스럽게 (josimseureopge), “carefully” 

Dictionary Form:

  • 조심스럽다 (josimseureopda), “to be cautious” 

Example:

  • 이 문제를 조심스럽게 심사숙고해 보도록 해요.
    I munjereul josimseureopge simsasukgohae bodorok haeyo.
    “Let’s consider the subject carefully.”

43. 깨끗하게 (kkaekkeuthage), “cleanly”

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 방을 깨끗하게 청소했어요.
    Bangeul kkaekkeuthage cheongsohaesseoyo.
    “I cleaned my room cleanly.”

44. 멋지게 (meotjige), “beautifully” 

Dictionary Form:

  • 멋지다 (meotjida), “to be beautiful” — Usually used to describe a man’s action 

Example:

  • 그 남자는 오늘밤 정말 멋지게 춤췄어. 
    Geu namjaneun oneulbam jeongmal meotjige chumchwosseo.
    “He really danced beautifully tonight.”

45. 멀게 (meolge), “far” 

Dictionary Form:

  • 멀다 (meolda), “to be far” 

Example:

  • 난 그날이 멀게만 느껴지지 않아.
    Nan geunari meolgeman neukkyeojiji ana.
    “I feel like that day isn’t too far off.”

46. 빠르게 (ppareuge), “fast” 

Dictionary Form:

Example:

  • 그것은 빠르게 움직여요.
    Geugeoseun pareuge umjitgyeoyo.
    “It moves fast.”
Connecting Two Puzzle Pieces

4. List of -으로 (-euro) Adverbs

Now, to continue our list of Korean adverbs, we’ll go through the -으로 (-euro) adverbs. 다 (gandanhada), “to be siNow, to continue our list of Korean adverbs, we’ll go through the -으로 (-euro) adverbs. 

47. 일반적으로 (ilbanjeogeuro), “generally”

Dictionary Form:

  • 일반적 (ilbanjeok), “general”      

Example:

  • 일반적으로 말하면…
    Ilbanjeogeuro malhamyeon…
    “Generally speaking …”

48. 자동으로 (jadongeuro), “automatically”

Dictionary Form:

  • 자동적 (jadongjeok), “automatic”    

Example:

  • 문이 자동으로 열립니다. 
    Muni jadongeuro yeollimnida.
    “The door will automatically open.”

49. 공식적으로 (gongsikjeogeuro), “formally”

Dictionary Form:

  • 공식적 (gongsikjeok), “formal”  

Example:

  • 공식적으로 사과하세요.
    gongsikjeogeuro sagwahaseyo.
    “I want you to apologize formally.”

50. 비공식적으로 (bigongsikjeogeuro), “informally”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 비공식적 (bigongsik), “informally”

Example:

  • 이 미팅은 비공식적으로 진행되었습니다. 
    I mitingeun bigongsikjeogeuro jinhaengdoeeotseumnida.
    “The meeting was held informally (unofficially) on Friday.”

51. 협동적으로 (hyeopdongjeogeuro), “cooperatively”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 협동적 (hyeopdongjeok), “cooperative”    

Example:

  • 두 팀은 협동적으로 이 프로젝트를 진행해 갔다.
    Du timeun hyeopdongjeogeuro i peurojekteureul jinhaenghae gatda.
    “These two teams cooperatively proceeded with the project.”

52. 주기적으로 (jugijeogeuro), “regularly”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 주기적 (jugijeok), “periodic”

Example:

  • 운동은 주기적으로 하는것이 좋아요. 
    Undongeun jugijeogeuro haneungeosi joayo.
    “It’s better to exercise regularly.”

53. 장기적으로 (janggijeogeuro), “in the long term”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 장기적 (jangijeok), “long-term”    

Example:

  • 장기적으로 보면, 주식에 투자하는 것도 좋을지도 몰라.
    Janggijeogeuro bomyeon, jusige tujahaneun geotdo joeuljido molla.
    “In the long view, it might be better to invest in stocks.”

54. 단기적으로 (dangijeogeuro), “in the short term”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 단기적 (dangijeok), “short-term”

Example:

  • 단기적으로는 세일즈 건수가 떨어질 수도 있어요.  
    Dangijeogeuroneun seiljeu geonsuga tteoreojil sudo isseoyo.
    “In the short run, the number of sales may decrease.”

55. 상식적으로 (sangsikjeogeuro), “using common sense”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 상식적 (sangsikjeok), “common sense” 

Example:

  • 그건 상식적으로 생각해도 이해가 안돼.
    geugeon sangsikjeogeuro saenggakaedo ihaega andwae.
    “From a common-sense point of view, that is incomprehensible.”

56. 사적으로 (sajeogeuro), “personally”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 사적 (sajeok), “personal”  

Example:

  • 그 사람을 사적으로 아세요?
    Geu sarameul sajeogeuro aseyo?
    “Do you know him personally?”

57. 적극적으로 (jeokgeukjeogeuro), “actively”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 적극적 (jeokgeukjeok), “active”    

Example:

  • 지난번 선거운동에 적극적으로 참여했었어요.
    Jinanbeon seongeoundonge jeokgeukjeogeuro chamyeohaesseosseoyo.
    “I was actively involved in the last campaign.”

58. 획기적으로 (hoekgijeogeuro), “innovatively”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 획기적 (hoekgijeok), “innovative”    

Example:

  • 사람들이 어떻게 이러한 문제들을 해결할 것인가에 관하여 혁신적으로 생각하기를 원해요.
    Saramdeuri eotteoke ireohan munjedeureul haegyeolhal geosingae gwanhayeo hyeoksinjeogeuro saenggakagireul wonhaeyo.
    “We want people to think innovatively about how they tackle these problems.”

59. 열정적으로 (yeoljeongjeogeuro), “enthusiastically”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 열정적 (yeoljeongjeok), “enthusiastic” 

Example:

  • 그 여자는 열광적으로 환호하였다.
    geu yeojaneun yeolgwangjeogeuro hwanhohayeotda.
    “She cheered enthusiastically.”

60. 극적으로 (geukjeogeuro), “dramatically”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 극적 (geukjeok), “dramatic” 

Example:

  • 두 사람은 극적으로 마주하게 되었네요.
    Du sarameun geukjeogeuro majuhage doeeonneyo.
    “They met again dramatically.”

61. 기적적으로 (gijeokjeogeuro), “miraculously”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 기적적 (gijeokjeok), “miraculous”      

Example:

  • 그는 기적적으로 살아 남았다.
    Geuneun gijeokjeogeuro sara namatda.
    “He miraculously survived.”

62. 전적으로 (jeonjeogeuro), “completely”

Dictionary Form:  

  • 전적 (jeonjeok), “complete”  

Example:

  • 전적으로 동의합니다.
    Jeonjeogeuro donguihamnida.
    “I completely agree.”

63. 상대적으로 (sangdaejeogeuro), “relatively”

Dictionary Form:

  • 상대적 (sangdaejeok), “relative”     

Example:

  • 상대적으로 좁은 온도 범위 안에서만 작동한다.
    Sangdaejeogeuro jobeun ondo beomwi aneseoman jakdonghanda.
    “It works in a relatively narrow range of temperatures.”

64. 구체적으로 (guchejeogeuro), “in detail” / “concretely”

Dictionary Form:

  • 구체적 (guchejeok), “detailed”     

Example:

  • 구체적으로 말하면
    Guchejeogeuro malhamyeon
    “to put it in detail”

65. 의도적으로 (uidojeogeuro), “intentionally”

Dictionary Form:

  • 의도적 (uidojeok), “intentional” 

Example:

  • 날 의도적으로 피하는 이유라도 있나요?
    Nal uidojeogeuro pihaneun iyurado innayo?
    “Why are you intentionally avoiding me?”

66. 기본적으로 (gibonjeogeuro), “fundamentally”

Dictionary Form:

  • 기본적 (gibonjeok), “fundamental”     

Example:

  • 기본적으로, 그 문제를 풀기위해서는 두 가지 서로 다른 방법이 있어요.
    Gibonjeogeuro, geu munjereul pulgiwihaeseoneun du gaji seoro dareun bangbeobi isseoyo.
    “Fundamentally, there are two different ways to solve the problem.”

67. 본능적으로 (jijeogeuro), “instinctively”

Dictionary Form:

  • 본능적 (bonneungjeok), “instinctive”     

Example:

  • 우리의 뇌는 세 가지 방법으로 작동한다. 지적으로, 본능적으로, 그리고 감정적으로.
    Uriui noeneun se gaji bangbeobeuro jakdonghanda. Jijeogeuro, bonneungjeogeuro, geurigo gamjeongjeogeuro.
    “Our brains operate in three ways: intellectually, instinctually, and emotionally.”

68. 수동으로 (sudongeuro), “manually”

Dictionary Form:

  • 수동적 (sudongjeok), “manual”

Example:

  • 사용자가 수동으로 프로그램을 제거해야 합니다.
    Sayongjaga sudongeuro peurogeuraemeul jegeohaeya hamnida.
    “Users must manually uninstall the agent.”

69. 고질적으로 (gojiljeogeuro), “chronically”

Dictionary Form:

  • 고질적 (gojiljeok), “chronic”  

Example:

  • 실업률이 여전히 고질적으로 높다.
    Sireomnyuri yeojeonhi gojiljeogeuro nopda.
    “Unemployment remains chronically high.”

70. 심리적으로 (simnijeogeuro), “psychologically”

Dictionary Form:

  • 심리적 (simnijeok), “psychological” 

Example:

  • 그 여자가 심리적으로 준비 된건지 몰랐어.
    Geu yeojaga simnijeogeuro junbi doengeonji mollasseo.
    “I don’t know that she’s psychologically ready.”

71. 질적으로 (jiljeogeuro), “qualitatively”

Dictionary Form:

  • 질적 (jiljeok), “qualitative”  

Example:

  • 이 물건은 질적으로 달라요.
    I mulgeoneun jiljeogeuro dallayo.
    “This product is qualitatively different.”

72. 신체적으로 (sinchejeogeuro), “physically”

Dictionary Form:

  • 신체적 (sinchejeok), “physical”  

Example:

  • 난 그 사람에게 신체적으로 매력을 못 느끼겠는데?
    Nan geu saramege sinchejeogeuro maeryeogeul mot neukkigenneunde?
    “I don’t find him physically attractive.”

73. 시험적으로 (jamjeongjeogeuro), “tentatively”

Dictionary Form:

  • 시험적 (siheomjeok), “tentative”

Example:

  • 시험적으로 표를 만들어 봤어.
    Siheomjeogeuro pyoreul mandeureo bwasseo.
    “I tentatively prepared a table.”
A Drawing of a Person with Question Marks In Its head

5. List of Other Korean Adverbs

Here’s a list of other common Korean adverbs that have no certain rules. It’s a good idea to memorize each of the adverbs below. 

74. 틀림없이 (teullimeopsi), “certainly” 

Example:

  • 그 사람이 들으면 틀림없이 기뻐할 거야.
    Geu sarami deureumyeon teullimeopsi gippeohal kkeoya.
    “She’ll certainly be happy to hear that.”

75. 따로 (ttaro), “separately” 

Example:

  • 신입 사원들은 따로 교육을 받아요.
    Sinip sawondeureun ttaro gyoyugeul badayo.
    “New employees are trained separately.”

76. 갑자기 (gapjagi), “suddenly” 

Example:

  • 차가 갑자기 멈춰섰다.
    Chaga gapjagi meomchwoseotda.
    “The car suddenly stopped.”

77. 자꾸 (jakku), “continuously”

Example:

  • 자꾸 니 생각이나.
    Jakku ni saenggagina.
    “You are continuously on my mind.”

78. 일부러 (ilbureo), “deliberately” 

Example:

  • 나 화나게 하려고 일부러 그랬지.
    Na hwanage haryeogo ilbureo geuraetji.
    “You did that deliberately.”

79. 함부로 (hamburo), “carelessly”

Example:

  • 넌 가끔 말을 너무 함부로 말하는것 같아.
    Neon gakkeum mareul neomu hamburo malhaneungeot gata.
    “You speak carelessly sometimes.”

80. 직접 (jikjeop), “in person” 

Example:

  • 내가 그 사람을 직접 만나 볼께.
    Naega geu sarameul jikjeop manna bolkke.
    “I am going to meet him in person.”

81. (kkok), “for sure” 

Example:

  • 난 우리 강아지가가 꼭 돌아올 것이라고 믿어.
    Nan uri gangajigaga kkok doraol geosirago mideo.
    “I strongly believe that my dog will surely come back.”

82. 거의 (geoui), “almost” 

Example:

  • 막차 시간이 거의 다 됐네.
    Makcha sigani geoui da dwaenne.
    “It’s almost time for the last train.”

83. 함께 (hamkke), “together” 

Example:

  • 당신과 함께 늙고 싶어요.
    Dangsingwa hamkke neulkko sipeoyo.
    “I want to grow old together with you.”

84. 혼자 (honja), “alone” 

Example:

  • 넌 혼자가 아니야.
    Neon honjaga aniya.
    “You are not alone.”
A Lady Studying on the Bus with a Book

6. List of Frequency Adverbs in Korean

Now, let’s go through Korean frequency adverbs. 

85. 결코 (gyeolko), “never” 

Example: 

  • 결코 못 잊을 거예요.
    Gyeolko mot ijeul geoyeyo.
    “I’ll never forget it.”

86. 자주 (jaju), “frequently” 

Example: 

  • 원어민과 가능한 한 자주 말합니다.
    Woneomingwa ganeunghan han jaju malhamnida.
    “I speak as frequently as possible with native speakers.”

87. 보통 (botong), “usually” 

Example: 

  • 그 남자는 보통 일곱 시에는 일어난다.
    Geu namjaneun botong ilgop sieneun ireonanda.
    “He usually wakes up at seven in the morning.”

88. 항상 (hangsang), “always”

Example: 

  • 수업 첫날은 항상 쓸모 없어요.
    Sueop cheonnareun hangsang sseulmo eopseoyo.
    “The first day of class is always useless.”

89. 내내 (naenae), “all the time” 

Example: 

  • 이 나라는 일년 내내 기후가 편안해요!
    I naraneun illyeon naenae gihuga pyeonanhaeyo!
    “The country has a comfortable climate all year round!”

90. 나날이 (nanari), “daily”

Example: 

  • 오늘날의 사회는 나날이 변화하고 있다. 
    oneullarui sahoeneun nanari byeonhwahago itda.
    “The society today is changing daily.”

91. 가끔 (gakkeum), “occasionally”

Example: 

  • 언니는 가끔 나를 찾아와.
    ㄸonnineun gakkeum nareul chajawa.
    “My sister visits me occasionally.”

92. 좀처럼 (jomcheoreom), “seldom”

Example: 

  • 이 지방은 좀처럼 눈이 안 온와.
    ㅑ jibangeun jomcheoreom nuni an onwa.
    “It seldom snows in this region.”

93. 드물게 (deumulge), “sparsely”

Example: 

  • 이 곳은 인가가 드물어.
    I goseun ingaga deumureo.
    “This place is sparsely populated.”

7. List of Korean Adverbs of Place

More Essential Verbs

94. 여기에 (yeogie), “here”

Example: 

  • 여기에 서명을 해 주세요.
    Yeogie seomyeongeul hae juseyo.
    “Please sign here.”

95. 저기에 (jeogie), “there”

Example: 

  • 저기에 텐트를 칩시다.
    Jeogie tenteureul chipsida.
    “Let’s set up camp there.”

96. 저쪽에 (jeojjoge), “over there”

Example: 

  • 저쪽에 텐트를 칩시다.
    Jeojjoge tenteureul chipsida.
    “Let’s set up camp over there.”

97. 어디나 (eodina), “everywhere”

Example: 

  • 우리집 강아지는 나를 어디나 따라다닌다.
    Urijip gangajineun nareul eodina ttaradaninda.
    “My dog follows me everywhere.”

98. 아무데나 (amudena), “anywhere”

Example: 

  • 어디에서도 그걸 볼 수가 없어.
    Eodieseodo geugeol bol suga eopseo.
    “I can’t see it anywhere.”

99. 어디에도 (eodiedo), “nowhere”

Example: 

  • 내 가방이 어디에도 없어요.
    Nae gabangi eodiedo eopseoyo.
    “I can’t find my bags anywhere.”

100. 집에 (jibe), “home”

Example: 

  • 내가 어젯밤 네게 전화를 했는데 너 집에 없더라.
    Naega eojetbam nege jeonhwareul haenneunde neo jibe eopdeora.
    “I phoned you last night, but you weren’t at home.”

101. 바깥에 (bakkate), “out”

Example: 

  • 바깥에 추운데 서 있지 마.
    Bakkate chuunde seo itji ma.
    “Don’t stand outside in the cold.”

102. 떨어져 (tteoreojyeo), “away”

Example: 

  • 그 두 집은 오백미터 떨어져 있어.
    Geu du jibeun obaengmiteo tteoreojyeo isseo.
    “The two houses stood 500 meters apart.”
A Young Man Using His Laptop in Public

8. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Your Korean Studies

In summary, we looked at different Korean adverbs and how to use Korean adverbs in sentences. 

If you want to continue to challenge yourself and study even further, KoreanClass101 has many free study materials for you, so why not create your account today? Here are a few pages we recommend:

If you want to study more advanced adverbs, check out the pages below. 

We hope you enjoyed reading this article. Feel free to leave us a comment if you have any questions!

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Useful Verbs in Korean

Korean Keyboard: How to Install and Type in Korean

Thumbnail

You asked, so we provided—easy-to-follow instructions on how to set up your electronic devices to write in Korean! We’ll also give you a few excellent tips on how to use this keyboard, as well as some online and app alternatives if you prefer not to set up a Korean keyboard.

Log in to Download Your Free Korean Alphabet Worksheet Table of Contents
  1. Why it’s Important to Learn to Type in Korean
  2. Setting up Your Computer and Mobile Devices for Korean
  3. How to Activate an Onscreen Keyboard on Your Computer
  4. How to Change the Language Settings to Korean on Your Computer
  5. Activating the Korean Keyboard on Your Mobile Phone and Tablet
  6. Korean Keyboard Typing Tips
  7. How to Practice Typing Korean

1. Why it’s Important to Learn to Type in Korean

A keyboard

Learning a new language is made so much easier when you’re able to read and write/type it. This way, you will:

  • Get the most out of any dictionary and Korean language apps on your devices
  • Expand your ability to find Korean websites and use the various search engines
  • Be able to communicate much better online with your Korean teachers and friends, and look super cool in the process! 

2. Setting up Your Computer and Mobile Devices for Korean

A phone charging on a dock

It takes only a few steps to set up any of your devices to read and type in Korean. It’s super-easy on your mobile phone and tablet, and a simple process on your computer.

On your computer, you’ll first activate the onscreen keyboard to work with. You’ll only be using your mouse or touchpad/pointer for this keyboard. Then, you’ll need to change the language setting to Korean, so all text will appear in Korean. You could also opt to use online keyboards instead. Read on for the links!

On your mobile devices, it’s even easier—you only have to change the keyboard. We also provide a few alternatives in the form of online keyboards and downloadable apps.

3. How to Activate an Onscreen Keyboard on Your Computer

1- Mac

1. Go to System Preferences > Keyboard.

2. Check the option “Show Keyboard & Character Viewers in Menu Bar.”

3. You’ll see a new icon on the right side of the main bar; click on it and select “Show Keyboard Viewer.”

A screenshot of the keyboard viewer screen

2- Windows

1. Go to Start > Settings > Easy Access > Keyboard.

2. Turn on the option for “Onscreen Keyboard.”

3- Online Keyboards

If you don’t want to activate your computer’s onscreen keyboard, you also have the option to use online keyboards. Here are some good options:

4- Add-ons of Extensions for Browsers

Instead of an online keyboard, you could also choose to download a Google extension to your browser for a language input tool. The Google Input Tools extension allows users to use input tools in Chrome web pages, for example.

4. How to Change the Language Settings to Korean on Your Computer

Man looking at his computer

Now that you’re all set to work with an onscreen keyboard on your computer, it’s time to download the Korean language pack for your operating system of choice:

  • Windows 8 (and higher)
  • Windows 7
  • Mac (OS X and higher)

1- Windows 8 (and higher)

1. Go to Settings > Change PC Settings > Time & Language > Region & Language.

2. Click on “Add a Language” and select “Korean.” This will add it to your list of languages. It will appear as 한국어 with the note “language pack available.”

3. Click on “한국어” > “Options” > “Download.” It’ll take a few minutes to download and install the language pack.

4. As a keyboard layout, you’ll only need the one marked as “Korean- 한국어.” You can ignore other keyboard layouts.

2- Windows 7

1. Go to Start > Control Panel > Clock, Language, and Region.

2. On the “Region and Language” option, click on “Change Keyboards or Other Input Methods.”

3. On the “Keyboards and Languages” tab, click on “Change Keyboards” > “Add” > “Korean.”

4. Expand the option of “Korean” and then expand the option “Keyboard.” Select the keyboard layout marked as “Korean.” You can ignore other keyboard layouts. Click “OK” and then “Apply.”

3- Mac (OS X and higher)

If you can’t see the language listed, please make sure to select the right option from System Preferences > Language and Region

1. From the Apple Menu (top left corner of the screen) go to System Preferences > Keyboard.

2. Click the Input Sources tab and a list of available keyboards and input methods will appear.

3. Click on the plus button, select “2-Set Korean,” and add the “2-Set Korean” keyboard.

Adding a system language

5. Activating the Korean Keyboard on Your Mobile Phone and Tablet

Texting and searching in Korean will greatly help you master the language! Adding a Korean keyboard on your mobile phone and/or tablet is super-easy.

You could also opt to download an app instead of adding a keyboard. Read on for our suggestions.

Below are the instructions for both iOS and Android mobile phones and tablets.

1- iOS

1. Go to Settings > General > Keyboard.

2. Tap “Keyboards” and then “Add New Keyboard.”

3. Select “2-Set Korean” from the list.

4. When typing, you can switch between languages by tapping and holding on the icon to reveal the keyboard language menu.

2- Android

1. Go to Settings > General Management > Language and Input > On-screen Keyboard (or “Virtual Keyboard” on some devices) > Samsung Keyboard.

2. Tap “Language and Types” or “ + Select Input Languages” depending on the device and then “MANAGE INPUT LANGUAGES” if available.

3. Select “한국어” from the list.

4. When typing, you can switch between languages by swiping the space bar.

3- Applications for Mobile Phones

If you don’t want to add a keyboard on your mobile phone or tablet, these are a few good apps to consider:

6. Korean Keyboard Typing Tips

Typing in Korean can be very challenging at first! Therefore, we added here a few useful tips to make it easier to use your Korean keyboard.

A man typing on a computer

1- Computer

On Windows 8 Keyboard

  1. Keep in mind that you’ll find vowels on the right of your keyboard, and consonants will be on the left side. To create double consonants, press the Shift key while typing the single consonant. (Example, if you would like ot type ㅆ, press ㅅ+Shift).
  2. This will cause “ENG” to be changed to ‘한’ (or ‘KOR”), and another icon (marked “A”) will appear simultaneously to the left of the language sign.
  3. When you want to type Korean, hit the ALT key on the right side of your keyboard. (There are two ALT keys on the keyboard, however, only the right one works for this purpose.)
  4. Hitting the ALT key will make the status icon change to a Korean character ‘가’ (ga). Once this happens, you’ll be able to start typing in Korean. To toggle between Korean and English, simply hit the Right ALT key at any time.
  5. Vowels are on the right side of the keyboard, and consonants on the left. To create double consonants, press the Shift key while typing the single consonant. (Example, if you would like ot type ㅆ, press ㅅ+Shift).

On IOS Keyboard

  1. On your Mac, click on the flag image at the top right of your screen, and choose 한 (2-Set Korean). In the 2-Set Korean Keyboard, keep in mind that you’ll find vowels on the right of your keyboard, and consonants will be on the left side. This is its default setting for macOS Hangul.
  2. To create double consonants, press the Shift key while typing the single consonant. (Example, if you would like to type ㅆ, press “Shift” + “ㅅ.”

2- Mobile Phones

  1. Open any app that allows typing. A few good options are Messages, Google Widget, or Chrome.
  2. Tap the typing area. This opens the keyboard.
  3. For IOS, tap and hold the Globe key. It’s located at the left of the spacebar. The “Keyboard Settings” option and a list of keyboards will appear. Select the “Korean” keyboard. This will change the keyboard from its default language setting to Korean. Note that this menu can be used to toggle between various language keyboards you may have installed.
  4. For Android, tap the Keyboard Settings icon near the bottom of the keyboard. If you don’t see the gear, you may have to long-press a different key to make it appear. Tap “Add Keyboard” and choose “Korean” from the list. Select your desired layout.
    Afterward, tap the typing area and hold the Globe key. It’s in the bottom row of keys. A list of installed keyboards will appear. Tap “Korean.” The keyboard is now switched to Korean.

7. How to Practice Typing Korean

As you probably know by now, learning Korean is all about practice, practice, and more practice! Strengthen your Korean typing skills by writing comments on any of our lesson pages, and our teacher will answer. If you’re a KoreanClass101 Premium PLUS member, you can directly text our teacher via the My Teacher app—use your Korean keyboard to do this!

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