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Korean Conjunctions List: Essential Korean Conjunctions

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Conjunctions are an important part of every language. They allow us to connect our thoughts, make comparisons, and string together sentences. In this Korean conjunctions list, I’ll explain to you the basic conjunctions with plenty of examples so you can make the most out of the article and improve your Korean skills.

Ready to learn Korean conjunctions? Let’s get started!

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Table of Contents

  1. What is a Conjunction?
  2. Conjunctions to Correlate Similar Thoughts
  3. Conjunctions to Express Condition
  4. Conjunctions to Express Cause
  5. Conjunctions to Express Opposition
  6. Conjunctions to Express Contrasts with the Statement in the Main Clause
  7. Conjunctions to Express Preference
  8. Conjunctions to Express Reasons
  9. Conjunctions to Add Additional Information
  10. More Conjunctions
  11. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You Learn Korean


1. What is a Conjunction?

Sentence Patterns

According to the Oxford Dictionary, the definition of a conjunction is a word that’s used to connect phrases, clauses, and sentences. Conjunctions in Korean work similarly to how they work in any other language, and learning Korean conjunctions and how to use each one properly will certainly boost your confidence in speaking, writing, and reading.

There are many Korean conjunctions, and if you struggle to understand all of the different Korean conjunctions, you’re not alone. Many Korean learners—even native speakers—struggle to use Korean conjunctions appropriately. In our Korean conjunctions list and guide, we’re going to focus on fundamental connecting words in Korean so as not to overwhelm you.

By the end of this article, you should have a better idea about the basic Korean conjunction rules, and an expanded vocabulary of Korean language conjunctions!


2. Conjunctions to Correlate Similar Thoughts

Improve Listening

1- 그리고 (geurigo) - “and”

  • 그리고 (geurigo) is used to link two different words or phrases together.
  • Apply this conjunction when you want to correlate two words.

Example:

스테이크 그리고 레드와인 주세요.
Seuteikeu geurigo redeuwain juseyo.
“I would like a steak and a glass of red wine, please.”

난 한국 가면 떡볶이, 순대 그리고 김밥 먹을꺼야.
Nan hanguk gamyeon tteokbokki, sundae geurigo gimbap meogeulkkeoya.
“I’m going to eat tteokbokki, sundae, and gimbap when I go to Korea.”

2- ~랑 (~rang) - “and”

  • ~랑 (~rang) means the same thing as 그리고 (geurigo).
  • The difference is that this conjunction is attached after a noun stem, is strictly colloquial, and isn’t used in official documents.
    • 김치
      gimchirang bap
      “Kimchi and rice”
    • 김밥 순대
      gimbabirang Sundae
      “Kimbap and Sundae”
  • Since ~랑 (~rang) has the same value as geurigo, they can replace each other without generating any changes in the meaning.

Example:

스테이크 레드와인 주세요.
Seuteikeurang redeuwain juseyo.
“I would like a steak and a glass of red wine, please.”

난 한국 가면 떡볶이, 순대랑 김밥 먹을꺼야.
Nan hanguk gamyeon tteokbokkirang, sundaerang gimbap meogeulkkeoya.
“I’m going to eat tteokbokki, sundae, and gimbap when I go to Korea.”

3- ~고 (go) - “and”

  • ~ (go) means the same thing as rang and geurigo.
  • This conjunction is always attached after a verb stem and usually means “I will do this AND THEN I will do this.”
  • A synonym of ~ 고 (go) is 그리고 나서 (geurigo naseo) which means “then.”

Example:

내일 아침에 요가하* 저녁에는 복싱할거야.
Naeil achime yogahago jeonyeogeneun boksinghalgeoya.
“I am going to do yoga in the morning and boxing in the evening tomorrow.”

*하다 (hada) meaning “to do” and 고 (go) meaning “and,” become 하고 (hago), meaning “After I do…”

내일은 밥먹 바로 집으로 갈거야.
Naeireun bammeokgo baro jibeuro galgeoya.
“I am going to eat and (then) go home.”

* 먹다 (meokda) meaning “to eat” and 고 (go) meaning “and” become 먹고 (meokgo), meaning “After I eat.”

4- ~와/과 (~wa/gwa)

  • ~ (~wa) is usually attached to noun stems.
  • ~ (~gwa) is usually attached to verb stems and after nouns that end with consonants.

Example:

나는 친구가 될 수 없어.
Neowa naneun chinguga doel su eopseo.
“You and I can’t be friends.”

수영하는 것 축구 하는 것 중에 어떤 스포츠를 더 좋아하세요?
Suyeonghaneun geotgwa chukgu haneun geot junge eotteon seupocheureul deo joahaseyo?
“Between swimming and playing soccer, which do you prefer?”

A List of Vocabulary Words


3. Conjunctions to Express Condition

1- 만약 (manyak) - “if”

  • To talk about hypothetical situations, we often use 만약 (manyak), with the direct translation being “if” in English.
  • Note that 만약에 (manyage) is more commonly used in spoken language (conversation).

Example:

만약(에) 비가 온다면 난 그냥 집에 있을래.
Manyak(e) biga ondamyeon nan geunyang jibe isseullae.
“If it rains, I’m just going to stay at home.”

만약에 네가 시험에 불합격한다면 어떻게할거야?
Manyage nega siheome bulhapgyeokandamyeon eotteokehalgeoya?
“If you fail the exam, what are you going to do?”

2- 한다면 (handamyeon) - “if”

  • Although 만약 (manyak) and 한다면 (handamyeon) have the same meaning in English, these two conjunctions are used in different situations.
  • To differentiate these two conjunctions:
    • 만약 (manyak) focuses on hypothetical situations.
    • 한다면 (handamyeon) focuses more on actions.

Example:

그 회사가 망한다면 월급을 받지 못할거야.
Geu hoesaga manghandamyeon wolgeubeul batji mothalgeoya.
“If the company goes bankrupt, you will not receive the income anymore.”

네가 계속 그렇게 욕한다면 앞으로 너랑 친구되고 싶지 않아.
Nega gyesok geureoke yokandamyeon apeuro neorang chingudoego sipji ana.
“If you continue to swear like this, I don’t want to be friends with you.”


4. Conjunctions to Express Cause

Improve Listening Part 2

1- 그래서 (geuraeseo) - “so,” “therefore”

  • When this conjunction is used, the first sentence is usually a statement or fact, followed by the cause or evidence. 그래서 (geuraeseo) connects these two sentences together.

Example:

어제 많이 아팠어요. 그래서 학교에 못 갔어요.
Eoje mani apasseoyo. geuraeseo hakgyoe mot gasseoyo.
“I was really sick yesterday. Therefore I could not go to school.”

어제는 눈이 왔다. 그래서 하루 종일 집에 있었다.
Eojeneun nuni watda. geuraeseo haru jongil jibe isseotda.
“It rained yesterday, so I stayed home all day.”

2- 그렇기 때문에 (~gi ttaemune) - “therefore”

  • The second conjunction to express cause is ~기 때문에 (~gi ttaemune) which means “because of that” or “therefore” in English.

Example:

저녁을 일찍 먹었기 때문에, 배고프지 않아.
Jeonyeogeul iljjik meogeotgi ttaemune, baegopeuji ana.
“Because I had an early dinner, I am not hungry.”

사람들이 너무 많았기 때문에 빨리 집으로 갔다.
Saramdeuri neomu manatgi ttaemune ppalli jibeuro gatda.
“Because there were so many people, I went home.”

3- 그러므로 (geureomeuro) - “therefore”

  • This conjunction is rarely used in spoken language, but is often used in literature.
  • On the other hand, 그렇기 때문에 (~gi ttaemune), which we saw above, is commonly used in spoken language.

Example:

나는 생각한다. 그러므로 나는 존재한다.
Naneun saenggakanda. Geureomeuro naneun jonjaehanda.
“I think, therefore I am.”

The sentence below has the same meaning as above:

나는 생각한다. 그렇기 때문에 나는 존재한다.
naneun saenggakanda. geureoki ttaemune naneun jonjaehanda.
“I think, therefore I am.”

4- 따라서 (ttaraseo) - “so,” “therefore”

  • This conjunction means the same thing as 그러므로 (geureomeuro) and 그렇기 때문에 (~gi ttaemune).
  • 따라서 (ttaraseo) sounds a bit formal, therefore it’s not commonly used in spoken language.

Example:

물건의 가격이 많이 올랐다. 따라서 사람들이 물건을 사지 않을 것이다.
Mulgeonui gagyeogi mani ollatda. ttaraseo saramdeuri mulgeoneul saji aneul geosida.
“The price of goods has increased. Therefore, people will not buy them.”

지구온난화는 점점 더 심해지고 있다. 따라서 공해는 더욱더 심해질 것이다.
Jiguonnanhwaneun jeomjeom deo simhaejigo itda. Ttaraseo gonghaeneun deoukdeo simhaejil geosida.
“Global warming is getting worse and worse, thus increasing pollution.”

A Man Expressing His Opinions to His Colleagues


5. Conjunctions to Express Opposition

The conjunctions mentioned below all indicate that the following sentence will be in contrast to the previous one. Let’s have a look each Korean conjunction.

1- 하지만 (hajiman) - “but”

  • 하지만 (hajiman) means “but” or “however” in English.
  • This conjunction is used at the beginning of a sentence to combine two opposing clauses.
  • You can also shorten 하지만 (hajiman) and combine two clauses with ~지만 (~jiman).

Example:

우리 언니는 노란색을 좋아해. 하지만 언니의 남자친구는 노랑색을 싫어해.
Uri eonnineun noransaegeul joahae. Hajiman eonniui namjachinguneun norangsaegeul sileohae.
“My sister likes yellow. But her boyfriend doesn’t like yellow.”

The sentence above has the same meaning as the sentence below:

=우리 언니는 노랑색을 좋아하지만 언니의 남자친구는 노랑색을 싫어해.
Uri eonnineun norangsaegeul joahajiman eonniui namjachinguneun norangsaegeul sileohae.

우리 집에 언제든지 놀러와돼. 하지만 오기전에 전화해줘.
Uri jibe eonjedeunji nolleowadwae. Hajiman ogijeone jeonhwahaejwo.
“You can always come to my house. But call me before (you plan to come).”

The sentence above has the same meaning as the sentence below:

=우리 집에 언제든지 놀러와도 되지만 오기 전에 전화해줘.
Uri jibe eonjedeunji nolleowado doejiman ogi jeone jeonhwahaejwo.

2- 그렇지만 (geureochiman) - “but,” “however”

  • When this conjunction is used, the sentence structure usually goes like this: [Admitting what a speaker said] however [say conflicting claims.]

Let’s look at an example. Your friend Sujin likes Jinsu a lot, and she believes that Jinsu likes her too. But you know that it’s not true because you’ve seen that Jinsu is dating someone else. In this situation, you can say:

수진이는 진수를 좋아해. 그렇지만 진수는 수진이를 좋아하지 않아.
Sujinineun jinsureul joahae. Geureochiman jinsuneun sujinireul joahaji ana.
“Sujin likes Jinsu. However, Jinsu does not like Sujin.”

Let’s have a look at another example:

네 말도 일리는 있어. 그렇지만 다른 사람들의 의견도 들어봐야지.
Ne maldo illineun isseo. Geureochiman dareun saramdeurui uigyeondo deureobwayaji.
“I agree with your points, but I need to listen to what other people say too.”

3- 그러나 (gureona) - “however”

  • 그러나 (gureona) has the same value as the other conjunctions mentioned above.
  • This conjunction is only used in formal settings.

Example:

6월이 되어 날씨가 따뜻해졌다. 그러나 최근에는 매일 비가 오고 있다.
Yuwori doeeo nalssiga ttatteuthaejyeotda. Geureona choegeuneneun maeil biga ogo itda.
“As June began, the weather has become warmer. However, it has been raining everyday.”

4- 그런데 (geureonde) / 근데 (geunde) - “but,” “by the way”

  • This conjunction is often used to change the topic.
  • You’ll often hear 근데 (geunde) when conversing with locals. 근데 (geunde) is a shortened word for 그런데 (geureonde).

Example:

그런데 어디서 밥 먹을까?
Geureonde eodiseo bap meogeulkka?
“By the way, where should we eat?”

The sentence above has the same meaning as the sentence below:

=근데 어디서 밥 먹을까?
Geunde eodiseo bap meogeulkka?

그 친구 알아. 그런데 이름을 모르겠네.
Geu chingu ara. Geureonde ireumeul moreugenne.
“I know her, but I forgot her name.”

The sentence above has the same meaning as the sentence below:

= 그 친구 알아. 근데 이름을 모르겠네.
Geu chingu ara. Geunde ireumeul moreugenne.

우와 이 가방 엄청 이쁘다. 그런데 이거 얼마예요?
Uwa i gabang eomcheong ippeuda. Geureonde igeo eolmayeyo?
“Wow, this bag is really pretty. By the way, how much is this?”

The sentence above has the same meaning as the sentence below:

= 우와 이 가방 엄청 이쁘다. 근데 이거 얼마예요?
Uwa i gabang eomcheong ippeuda. Geunde igeo eolmayeyo?


6. Conjunctions to Express Contrasts with the Statement in the Main Clause

1- 그래도 (geuraedo) - “regardless,” “still”

  • The common translation of 그래도 (geuraedo) is “regardless” or “still.”
  • When talking about a situation, use 그래도 (geuraedo) to say “regardless of the situation.”
    • 철수의 배가 아프기 시작했다. (Cheolsuui baega apeugi sijakaetda.) — “Cheolsu started to have stomach cramps.” [situation]
    • 그래도 (geuraedo) [regardless of what happened to him]
    • 나는 밥을 먹었다. (naneun babeul meogeotda) — “He continued eating rice.” [continued what he was doing]

More examples:

이상하게 들릴지 모르지만 그래도 그건 사실이야.
Isanghage deullilji moreujiman geuraedo geugeon sasiriya.
“Strange as it may sound, it’s still true.”

내일 비가 온다는데, 그래도 우리 낚시하러 갈꺼지?
Naeil biga ondaneunde, geuraedo uri naksihareo galkkeoji?
“It’s going to rain tomorrow, but we are still going tomorrow, right?”

2- 그럼에도 불구하고 (geureomedo bulguhago) - “nevertheless,” “although”

  • Use this conjunction when you say something that contrasts with what has just been said/happened.
  • The sentence structure would be: [INCIDENT] +그럼에도 불구하고 (geureomedo bulguhago) + [UNEXPECTED RESULT].

Example:

나를 따라오지 말라고 했는데 그럼에도 불구하고 그 남자는 나를 따라왔다.
Nareul ttaraoji mallago haenneunde geureomedo bulguhago geu namjaneun nareul ttarawatda.
“I told him a couple of times not to follow me, nevertheless he did.”

철수는 많이 아팠다. 그럼에도 불구하고 그는 학교로 갔다.
Cheolsuneun mani apatda. Geureomedo bulguhago geuneun hakgyoro gatda.
“Cheolsu was very sick, yet he went to school.”

A Red Apple That Is Placed Between Two Green Apples, Is Being Grabbed By A Hand


7. Conjunctions to Express Preference

1- 이나 (ina) - “or”

  • 이나 (ina) is attached only to noun stems.
  • The sentence structure should be: [NOUN] +이나 (ina) + [NOUN].
  • When someone uses this conjunction in a sentence, this indicates that the person has not decided which noun will be acted upon.

Example:

저는 초콜릿 빵이나 비빔밥을 먹고 싶어요.*
Jeoneun chokollit ppangina bibimbabeul meokgo sipeoyo.
“I want to eat either a chocolate bread or bibimbap.”

*He/she has not decided if he/she wants to eat bread or bibimbap.

대학교에서 심리학이나 패션 과를 공부하고 싶어요.
Daehakgyoeseo simnihagina paesyeon gwareul gongbuhago sipeoyo.
“I want to study either psychology or fashion design at university.”

2- 아니면 (animyeon) - “or”

  • 아니면 (animyeon) means the same thing as 이나 (ina).
  • The rule is that this conjunction is used to link two sentences.
  • The sentence structure should be: [SENTENCE] + 아니면 (animyeon) + [SENTENCE].
  • Moreover, it indicates that the speaker has not decided which action verbs will be acted upon.

Example:

아침에 복싱을 하는 게 좋을까 아니면 요가를 하는 게 좋을까?
Achime boksingeul haneun ge joeulkka animyeon yogareul haneun ge joeulkka?
“Should I do boxing or yoga in the morning?”

내일 인사동로 갈래 아니면 동대문 시장 갈래?
Naeil Insadongeuro gallae animyeon dongdaemun sijang gallae?
“Would you rather go to the Insadong or Dongdaemun market?”

3- 거나 (geona) - “or”

  • 거나 (geona) is used to link descriptive and action verbs and adverbs.

Example:

부모님 앞에서 담배를 피우거나 술을 마시면 안된다.
Bumonim apeseo dambaereul piugeona sureul masimyeon andoenda.
“You can’t smoke a cigarette or drink alcohol in front of your parents.”

아침에 복싱하거나 요가하거나 너 마음대로 해.
Achime boksinghageona yoga hageona ne maeumdaero hae.
“It’s up to you whether you do boxing or yoga in the morning. Do what you want.”

4- 또는 (ttoneun) - “or”

  • This conjunction is a formal way to say or express your preference.
  • You can replace 또는 (ttoneun) with 이나 (ina) or 아니면 (animyeon) in sentences. It will sound less formal, but the meaning does not change.

Example:

월요일 또는 수요일
Wollyoil ttoneun suyoil
“Monday or Wednesday.”

The sentences below have a different conjunction but mean the same thing:

= 월요일이나 수요일
Wollyoirina suyoil

= 월요일 아니면 수요일
Wollyoil animyeon suyoil

가야금 또는 장구 둘 중 하나를 선택하시오.
Gayageum ttoneun janggu dul jung hanareul seontaekasio.
“Choose either gayageum or jangu.”


8. Conjunctions to Express Reasons

1- 때문에 (ttaemune) - “Because of…”

  • 때문에 (ttaemune) means “because of…” and this conjunction is attached to nouns.
  • Add a noun before the conjunction, then the rest of the clause will indicate events that happened as a result of the noun preceding 때문에 (ttaemune).

Example:

때문에 공부할 시간이 없어.
Il ttaemune gongbuhal sigani eopseo.
“Because of work, I don’t have time to study.”

대학교 등록금 때문에 매일 아르바이트 하고 있어요.
Daehakgyo deungnokgeum ttaemune maeil areubaiteu hago isseoyo.
“Because of the tuition fee, I am working part-time everyday.”

2- 왜냐하면 (waenyahamyeon) - “because…”

  • 왜냐하면 (waenyahamyeon) means “because.”
  • When using this conjunction in sentences, the grammatical order should be: [result] + 왜냐하면 (waenyahamyeon) + [reason].
  • You can also say 왜냐면 (waenyamyeon), which is a shortened version of 왜냐하면 (waenyahamyeon), and is used in spoken language.

Example:

어제 잠을 잘 수가 없었어요. 왜냐하면 이웃이 너무 시끄러웠거든요.
Eoje jameul jal suga eopseosseoyo. Waenyahamyeon iusi neomu sikkeureowotgeodeunyo.
“I could not sleep last night because the neighbor was really noisy.”

잠을 잘 수가 없어. 왜냐하면 방금 커피를 마셨거든.
Jameul jal suga eopseo. Waenyahamyeon banggeum keopireul masyeotgeodeun.
“I can’t sleep because I just drank coffee.”

A Man Is Expressing His Opinion with a Mic and a Paper in Front of Him


9. Conjunctions to Add Additional Information

1- 게다가 (gedaga) - “moreover,” “in addition”

  • The meaning of 게다가 (gedaga) is exactly the same as the conjunction words 덧붙이자면 (deotbuchijamyeon) and 뿐만 아니라 (ppunman anira).
  • You can also say 그리고 instead of 게다가. The meaning does not change.
  • If you’ve said 그리고 (geurigo) many times (in writing or speech), try using 게다가 (gedaga).

Example:

게다가 웃으면 기분이 좋아진다.
Gedaga useumyeon gibuni joajinda.
“Moreover, when you laugh, you feel better.”

날씨가 너무 추웠고 게다가 눈까지 내렸다.
Nalssiga neomu chuwotgo gedaga nunkkaji naeryeotda.
“The weather was extremely cold; moreover, it snowed.”

2- 덧붙이자면 (deotbuchijamyeon) - “additionally,” “in addition,” “plus”

  • 덧붙이자면 (deotbuchijamyeon) means the same thing as 게다가 (gedaga).
  • A common phrase that uses this conjunction is 덧붙여 말하자면… (deotbutyeo malhajamyeon…), meaning “making an additional remark.”

Example:

정국오빠는 너무 잘 생겼어요. 덧붙이자면 노래도 잘해요.
Jeonggugoppaneun neomu jal saenggyeosseoyo. Deotbuchijamyeon noraedo jalhaeyo.
“Jungkook is so handsome. Plus, he’s a great singer.”

판타지 소설을 찾고 있다면 이 책을 추천할게요.
덧붙이자면 이 책은 베스트셀러이기도 해요.

Pantaji soseoreul chatgo itdamyeon i chaegeul chucheonhalgeyo.
Deotbuchijamyeon i chaegeun beseuteuselleoigido haeyo.

“If you’re looking for a fantasy novel, I recommend this book.
In addition, this is also one of the best sellers.”

3- 뿐만 아니라 (ppunman anira) - “besides,” “also”

  • When 뿐만 아니라 (ppunman anira) is attached to the end of a clause, it creates the meaning of “not only A, but also B.”

Example:

한국 드라마는 한국에서 뿐만 아니라 해외에서도 매우 인기가 있다.
Hanguk deuramaneun hangugeseo ppunman anira haeoeeseodo maeu ingiga itda.
“Korean dramas are not only popular in Korea, but also overseas.”

이곳에서 옥수수 뿐만 아니라 고구마도 살 수 있어요.
Iigoseseo oksusu ppunman anira gogumado sal su isseoyo.
“You can buy not only corn, but sweet potatoes too.”


10. More Conjunctions

Here are four additional conjunctions for you to learn!

1- 반면에 (banmyeone) - “on the other hand,” “while”

  • 반면에 (banmyeone) comes between two sentences.
  • Usually, the first sentence and the second sentence contrast each other.

Examples:

김치를 좋아하는 사람도 있지만, 반면에 김치를 싫어하는 사람도 있다.
Kimchireul joahaneun saramdo itjiman, banmyeone gimchireul sileohaneun saramdo itda.
“There are some people who like Kimchi, while others don’t.”

발렌타인 데이에 초콜릿을 많이 받는 사람도 있지만,
반면에 한개도 받지 못하는 사람도 있다.

Ballentain deie chokolliseul mani banneun saramdo itjiman,
banmyeone hangaedo batji mothaneun saramdo itda.

“There are some people who receive many chocolates on Valentine’s Day.
On the other hand, there are others who get nothing.”

2- 결국 (gyeolguk) - “eventually,” “ultimately”

  • You can also say 결국에는 (gyeolgugeneun), which means the same thing as 결국 (gyeolguk).

Example:

결국 우리가 이겼다.
Gyeolguk uriga igyeotda.
“Finally, we won the game.”

결국 원국이는 지민이 대신에 호연이를 선택했다.
Gyeolguk Wongugineun Jimini daesine Hoyeonireul seontaekaetda.
“At close of play, Wonkuk chose Hohyun instead of Jimin.”

3- 마지막으로 (majimageuro) - “lastly”

  • 마지막으로 (majimageuro) means “for the last time,” “lastly,” and “last time.”

Example:

한국을 마지막으로 가본 지가 10년이나 되었어요.
Hangugeul majimageuro gabon jiga 10nyeonina doeeosseoyo.
“It has been ten years since I visited Korea.”

마지막으로 몇 마디만 더 하겠습니다.
Majimageuro myeot madiman deo hagetseumnida.
“I would like to add a few words in conclusion.”

4- 마찬가지로 (machangajiro) - “similarly,” “likewise”

  • 마찬가지로 (machangajiro) means “like,” or “likewise” in English.
  • Also, this conjunction links two clauses that have a similar meaning.

Example:

동물도 사람과 마찬가지로 감정을 가지고 있다.
Dongmuldo saramgwa machangajiro gamjeongeul gajigo itda.
“Like humans, animals have feelings.”

개도 사람과 마찬가지로 잡식 동물이다.
Gaedo saramgwa machangajiro japsik dongmurida.
“Like humans, dogs are omnivores.”

Man Passing His Korean Test


11. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You Learn Korean

We hope you enjoyed learning about Korean conjunctions with us! In Korean vocabulary, conjunctions are essential little words and phrases that you really should know. Further, for impeccable Korean grammar, conjunctions should be one of your top learning priorities.

Are there any conjunctions you’re still struggling with, or any you still want to know? Let us know in the comments!

It’s easy to be overwhelmed when you have to memorize so many conjunctions. But don’t worry, learning a language isn’t easy and it takes time. If you’re still not sure when to use these conjunctions, you’re more than welcome to leave a post on our forum. There are many native speakers and Korean learners, like you, who will be happy to help you learn Korean.

For further learning, we have a lesson called “Korean Conjunctions: Add Seaweed, and Meat, and Garlic!” where you can practice learning Korean conjunctions as well as vocabulary. In addition, check out our vocabulary list called “Must-Know Adverbs and Phrases for Connecting Thoughts,” where we listed twenty Korean conjunctions with pronunciation audios and example sentences.

Happy learning!

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Learn Korean Dates: Days of the Week in Korean and More

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Do you know how to say Korean dates (months, weeks, days, and years)? In this blog, we’re going to introduce not only days of the week in Korean, but also hours, seconds, and much more important vocabulary for learning Korean dates and times. Before we take a closer look at date and time in Korean, let’s look at the Korean dates format.

Table of Contents

  1. How are Dates Usually Written and Read in Korean?
  2. How to Say the Years in Korean
  3. Korean Dates: Months
  4. How to Say Korean Calendar Dates
  5. Saying the Days of the Week in Korean
  6. How to Say the Hours in Korean
  7. How to Say the Minutes in Korean
  8. How to Say the Seconds in Korean
  9. How to Say Other Time-related Words
  10. Interesting Korean Celebration Days
  11. Let’s Practice
  12. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Korean

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1. How are Dates Usually Written and Read in Korean?

In Korea, the order of the date is written: 1.) Year, 2.) Month, and 3.) Day. We’ll explain this in more detail later, but for now, here’s how you need to write dates in Korean: [”year”]년 (nyeon), [”month”]월 (wol), [”day”]일 (il).

For example, let’s say that today is the 26th of January, 2019. In Korean, it’s written as 2019년 1월 26일 (icheonsipgunyeon irwol isibyugil), or “2019, January 26th.” If this order is the same in your country, then it shouldn’t be too difficult for you. But if the order is different in your country, then it can be confusing sometimes.

This is especially important to keep in mind when you purchase a product that has an expiration date written on the package. Sometimes the first two numbers of the year aren’t included in the expiration date either (e.g. “90″ instead of “1990″), so don’t get confused about the date. For example, when you see an expiration date of 20/09/21, it doesn’t mean “20th of September, 2021″; it’s “September 21th, 2020.”

Now, let’s learn more important information about dates in South Korea.

Street Signs


2. How to Say the Years in Korean

If you’re not familiar with numbers in Korean, it’s a good idea to first become familiar with the simpler numbers. Once you have a good understanding of Korean numbers, dates will become a lot simpler.

As you may already know, there are two ways to count numbers in Korea: Sino Korean and Native Korean. To count the years, you’ll only need Sino Korean numbers.

For example, if you were born in 1985:

  • 1000, read as 천 (cheon), meaning “one-thousand”
  • 900, read as 구백 (gubaek), meaning “nine-hundred”
  • 80, read as 팔십 (palsib), meaning “eighty”
  • 5, read as 오 (o), meaning “five”

All together, it becomes 천구백팔십오 (cheongubaekpalsibo), meaning “one thousand nine hundred eighty five.”

To say “the year,” you need to say 년 (nyeon). So to say, “The year of 1985,” it becomes 천구백팔십오년 (cheongubaekpalsibonyeon).

In Korea, there’s a number of ways to ask which year someone was born in:

  1. 몇년생이에요?
    Myeonnyeonsaengieyo?
    “Which year were you born in?”
  2. 몇년도에 태어났어요?
    Myeonnyeondoe taeeonasseoyo?
    “Which year were you born in?”
  3. 몇살이에요?
    Myeotsarieyo?
    Technically, it means “How old are you?” but you can answer by stating the year, too.

From 2002 to 2019

Korean Romanization Translation
2002년 (이천이년) 2002nyeon (icheoninyeon) “The year 2002″
2003년 (이천삼년) 2003nyeon (icheonsamnyeon) “The year 2003″
2004년 (이천사년) 2004nyeon (icheonsanyeon) “The year 2004″
2005년 (이천오년) 2005nyeon (icheononyeon) “The year 2005″
2006년 (이천십육년) 2006nyeon (icheonsibyungnyeon) “The year 2006″
2007년 (이천칠년) 2007nyeon (icheonchillyeon) “The year 2007″
2008년 (이천팔년) 2008nyeon (icheonpallyeon) “The year 2008″
2009년 (이천구년) 2009nyeon (icheongunyeon) “The year 2009″
2010년 (이천십년) 2010nyeon (icheonsimnyeon) “The year 2010″
2011년 (이천십일년) 2011nyeon (icheonsibillyeon) “The year 2011″
2012년 (이천십이년) 2012nyeon (icheonsibinyeon) “The year 2012″
2013년 (이천십삼년) 2013nyeon (icheonsipsamnyeon) “The year 2013″
2014년 (이천십사년) 2014nyeon (icheonsipsanyeon) “The year 2014″
2015년 (이천십오년) 2015nyeon (icheonsibonyeon) “The year 2015″
2016년 (이천십육년) 2016nyeon (icheonsibyungnyeon) “The year 2016″
2017년 (이천십칠년) 2017nyeon (icheonsipchillyeon) “The year 2017″
2018년 (이천십팔년) 2018nyeon (icheonsip-pallyeon) “The year 2018″
2019년 (이천십구년) 2019nyeon (icheonsipgunyeon) “The year 2019″

Examples:

  • A: 너 몇년생이야?
    A: Neo myeonnyeonsaengiya?
    A: “Which year were you born in?”

    B: 나? 2010년.
    B: Na? icheonsimnyeon.
    B: “Me? In 2010.”

  • A: BTS의 슈가는 몇년도생이었더라?
    A: Bitieseuui syuganeun myeonnyeondosaengieotdeora?
    A: “What year was Suga from BTS born in?”

    B: 1993년!
    B: Cheongubaekgusipsamnyeon!
    B: “In 1993!”

Quiz:

Are you ready for a quiz? Let’s practice your Korean!

Q1. How do you say “The year of 2001″ in Korean?

  1. 이천삼년 (icheonsamnyeon)
  2. 이천오년 (icheononyeon)
  3. 이천일년 (icheonillyeon)
  4. 이천년 (icheonnyeon)

Q2. What does 이천십팔년 mean in English?

  1. “The year of 2019″
  2. “The year of 2018″
  3. “The year of 2010″
  4. “The year of 2009″

Q3. How do you write “the year” in Korean?

  1. 월 (wol)
  2. 일 (il)
  3. 년 (nyeon)
  4. 요일 (yoil)

Answers:

Q1. -> 4
Q2. -> 2
Q3. -> 3


3. Korean Dates: Months

Months

Now we can start learning the days and months in Korean. To say the months is very easy too; just add a number in Korean followed by 월 (wol), which means “month” in the Korean language. For example, to say September: “nine” is 구 (gu) in Korean, followed by 월 (wol), meaning “month.” So it becomes 구월 (guwol), or “September.” Let’s have a look at months in Korean and some examples below:

From January to December

Korean Romanization Translation
1월 (일월) 1wol (irwol) “January”
2월 (이월) 2wol (iwol) “February”
3월 (삼월) 3wol (samwol) “March”
4월 (사월) 4wol (sawol) “April”
5월 (오월) 5wol (owol) “May”
6월 (유월) 6wol (yuwol) “June”
7월 (칠월) 7wol (chirwol) “July”
8월 (팔월) 8wol (parwol) “August”
9월 (구월) 9wol (guwol) “September”
10월 (시월) 10wol (siwol) “October”
11월 (십일월) 11wol (sibirwol) “November”
12월 (십이월) 12wol (sibiwol) “December”

We also have a free online vocabulary list called 한국어로 월에 대해서 말하기 (hangugeoro wore daehaeseo malhagi) or “Talking about Months”, so check it out on our website.

Examples:

  • A: 너 몇월에 태어났어?
    A: Neo myeochwore taeeonasseo?
    A: “Which month were you born?”

    B: 나? 나 10월에 태어났어.
    B: Na? Na 10wore taeeonasseo.
    B: “Me? I was born in October.”

  • A: 부처님 오신날이 언제 였더라?
    A: Bucheonim osinnari eonje yeotdeora?
    A: “Which month was Buddha’s birthday?”

    B: 5월 8일!
    B: Owol paril!
    B: “It’s the 8th of May!”

Quiz:

Are you ready for a quiz? Let’s practice your Korean!

Q1. How do you say “September” in Korean?

  1. 시월 (siwol)
  2. 칠월 (chilwol)
  3. 일월 (ilwol)
  4. 구월 (guwol)

Q2. Which month has Christmas Day?

  1. 십이월 (sipiwol)
  2. 십일월 (sipilwol)
  3. 팔월 (palwol)
  4. 이월 (iwol)

Q3. Which month has Children’s Day in Korea?

  1. 사월 (sawol)
  2. 오월 (owol)
  3. 삼월 (samwol)
  4. 이월 (iwol)

Answers:

Q1 -> 4
Q2 -> 1
Q3 -> 2

A Red Monthly Calendar


3. How to Say Korean Calendar Dates

일 (il) means “one” in Korean, but it also means “day.” To say the days in Korean, use Sino Korean number followed by 일 (il). For example, to answer someone who asks what day Valentine’s Day is on, you can say: 발렌타인데이는 14일이에요 (ballentaindeineun sipsairieyo), meaning “Valentine’s Day is on the 14th.”

Something to remember: “1st” and “2nd” sound very similar in Korean. For this reason, Koreans often ask whether they understood you correctly or not. So if this happens, don’t be discouraged. Your pronunciation is perfect, it’s just how we do things. (We also use the number gestures for better clarity.)

From 1st to 31st

Korean Romanization Translation
1일 (일일) 1il (iril) “1st”
2일 (이일) 2il (iil) “2nd”
3일 (삼일) 3il (samil) “3rd”
4일 (사일) 4il (sail) “4th”
5일 (오일) 5il (o-il) “5th”
6일 (육일) 6il (yugil) “6th
7일 (칠일) 7il (chiril) “7th”
8일 (팔일) 8il (paril) “8th”
9일 (구일) 9il (guil) “9th”
10일 (십일) 10il (sibil) “10th”
11일 (십일일) 11il (sibiril) “11th”
12일 (십이일) 12il (sibiil) “12th”
13일 (십삼일) 13il (sipsamil) “13th”
14일 (십사일) 14il (sipsail) “14th”
15일 (십오일) 15il (siboil) “15th”
16일 (십육일) 16il (sibyugil) “16th”
17일 (십칠일) 17il (sipchiril) “17th”
18일 (십팔일) 18il (sip-paril) “18th”
19일 (십구일) 19il (sipguil) “19th”
20일 (이십일) 20il (isibil) “20th”
21일 (이십일일) 21il (isibiril) “21st”
22일 (이십이일) 22il (isibiil) “22nd”
23일 (이십삼일) 23il (isipsamil) “23rd”
24일 (이십사일) 24il (isipsail) “24th”
25일 (이십오일) 25il (isiboil) “25th”
26일 (이십육일) 26il (isibyugil) “26th”
27일 (이십칠일) 27il (isipchiril) “27th”
28일 (이십팔일) 28il (isip-paril) “28th”
29일 (이십구일) 29il (isipguil) “29th”
30일 (삼십일) 30il (samsibil) “30th”
31일 (삼십일일) 31il (samsibiril) “31st”

Examples:

  • A: 생일이 언제예요?
    A: Saengiri eonjeyeyo?
    A: “When is your birthday?”

    B: 9월 25일이에요.
    B: Guworisiboirieyo.
    B: “It’s the 25th of September.”

  • A: 너 여동생 생일이 언제야?
    A: Neo yeodongsaeng saengiri eonjeya?
    A: “When is your sister’s birthday?”

    B: 2월20일. 근데 너 왜 내 여동생 생일을 알고 싶은데?
    B: Iworisibil. geunde neo wae nae yeodongsaeng saengireul algo sipeunde?
    B: “It’s the 20th of February. Why do you want to know my sister’s birthday?”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you say 이월 십삼일 in Korean?

  1. 2월 13일
  2. 2월 14일
  3. 1월13일
  4. 1월14일

Q2. When is Christmas Day?

  1. 십일월 이십오일
  2. 십이월 이십오일
  3. 십이월 이일
  4. 사월 이십오일

Q3. How do you say 시월 이십일일 in English?

  1. “21st of November”
  2. “21st of April”
  3. “21st of May”
  4. “21st of October”

Answers:

Q1 -> 1
Q2 -> 2
Q3 -> 4


4. Saying the Days of the Week in Korean

Weekdays

요일 (yoil) means “day” in the Korean language. Let’s check out days in the Korean language as shown below!

From Monday to Sunday

Korean Romanization Translation
월요일 wollyoil “Monday”
화요일 hwayoil “Tuesday”
수요일 suyoil “Wednesday”
목요일 mongnyoil “Thursday”
금요일 geumyoil “Friday”
토요일 toyoil “Saturday”
일요일 illyoil “Sunday”

We also have a free online vocabulary list called 요일에 대해 말하기 (yoire daehae malhagi) or “Talking about Days”. Feel free to check it out on KoreanClass101.

Examples:

  • A: 오늘 무슨요일이지?
    A: Oneul museunyoiriji?
    A: “What day is it today?”

    B: 오늘? 화요일이야.
    B: Oneul? hwayoiriya.
    B: “Today? It’s Tuesday.”

  • A: 내일은 금요일이지?
    A: Naeireun geumyoiriji?
    A: “Tomorrow is Friday right?”

    B: 아니, 내일 토요일이야.
    B: Ani, naeil toyoiriya.
    B: “No, it’s Saturday tomorrow.”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you write “day” in Korean?

  1. 요일 (yoil)
  2. 시 (si)
  3. 년 (nyeon)
  4. 월 (wol)

Q2. How do you write “Sunday” in Korean?

  1. 월요일 (wollyoil)
  2. 화요일 (hwayoil)
  3. 금요일 (geumyoil)
  4. 일요일 (illyoil)

Q3. How do you write “Monday” in Korean?

  1. 일요일 (illyoil)
  2. 수요일 (suyoil)
  3. 월요일 (wollyoil)
  4. 목요일 (mongnyoil)

Answers:

Q1 -> 1
Q2 -> 4
Q3 -> 3

A Vintage Clock and a Calendar


5. How to Say the Hours in Korean

In this section, we’ll focus on “hours” (and not “the time” as in “What time is it?”). If you want to learn how to read the clock in Korean, check out our article titled 시간에 대해 말하기 (sigane daehae malhagi) or “Talking about Time.”

“Hours” in Korean is 시간 (sigan). Let’s have a look at the table below for more vocabulary.

Korean Romanization Translation
1시간 (한시간) 1sigan (hansigan) “One hour”
2시간 (두시간) 2sigan (dusigan) “Two hours”
3시간 (세시간) 3sigan (sesigan) “Three hours”
4시간 (네시간) 4sigan (nesigan) “Four hours”
5시간 (다섯시간) 5sigan (daseotsigan) “Five hours”
6시간 (여섯시간) 6sigan (yeoseotsigan) “Six hours”
7시간 (일곱시간) 7sigan (ilgopsigan) “Seven hours”
8시간 (여덟시간) 8sigan (yeodeolsigan) “Eight hours”
9시간 (아홉시간) 9sigan (ahopsigan) “Nine hours”
10시간 (열시간) 10sigan (yeolsigan) “Ten hours”
11시간 (열한시간) 11sigan (yeolhansigan) “Eleven hours”
12시간 (열두시간) 12sigan (yeoldusigan) “Twelve hours”

Examples:

  • A: 비행기가 2시간이나 지연됐어.
    A: Bihaenggiga dusiganina jiyeondwaesseo.
    A: “The plane got delayed for two hours.”

    B: 아 정말? 그럼 2시간 뒤에 픽업하러 갈께.
    B: A jeongmal? Geureom dusigan dwie pigeopareo galkke.
    B: “Oh really? I will come and pick you up after two hours then.”

  • A: 하루 한시간은 꼭 요가를 하려고 해.
    A: Haru hansiganeun kkok yogareul haryeogo hae.
    A: “I am trying to do yoga at least one hour per day.”

    B: 그건 좋은 생각인것 같아. 나는 일주일에 3시간은 꼭 조깅을 하고 있어.
    B: Geugeon joeun saenggagingeot gata. Naneun iljuire sesiganeun kkok jogingeul hago isseo.
    B: “That’s a great idea. I do jogging for three hours per week.”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you write “hour(s)” in Korean?

  1. 시간 (sigan)
  2. 월 (wol)
  3. 일 (il)
  4. 년 (nyeon)

Q2. How do you say “twelve hours” in Korean?

  1. 열시간 (yeolsigan)
  2. 여덟시간 (yeodeolsigan)
  3. 네시간 (nesigan)
  4. 열두시간 (yeoldusigan)

Q3. How do you write “twenty-four hours” in Korean?

  1. 한시간 (hansigan)
  2. 이십사시간 (isipsasigan)
  3. 일곱시간 (ilgopsigan)
  4. 다섯시간 (daseotsigan)

Answers:

Q1 -> 1
Q2 -> 4
Q3 -> 2


6. How to Say the Minutes in Korean

“Minute(s)” is 분 (bun) in Korean. When you want to write “how many minutes” in Korean, it’s 몇분 (myeotbun).

Let’s have a look at a number of examples:

Korean Romanization Translation
5분 (오분) 5bun (obun) “Five minutes”
10분 (십분) 10bun (sipbun) “Ten minutes”
20분 (이십분) 20bun (isipbun) “Twenty minutes”
35분 (삼십오분) 35bun (samsibobun) “Thirty-five minutes”
42분 (사십이분) 42bun (sasibibun) “Forty-two minutes”
51분 (오십일분) 51bun (osibilbun) “Fifty-one minutes”
59분 (오십구분) 59bun (osipgubun) “Fifty-nine minutes”

Examples:

  • A: 몇시에 도착할 것 같아?
    A: Myeotsie dochakal geot gata?
    A: “When do you think you will arrive?”

    B: 10분안에 도착할께.
    B: Sipbunane dochakalkke.
    B: “I will be there in ten minutes.”

  • A: 휴, 캐런은 약속 시간에 맨날 10분 이상 늦더라.
    A: Hyu, kaereoneun yaksok sigane maennal 10bun isang neutdeora.
    A: “Phew, Karen is always late for at least ten minutes.”

    B: 야, 내 친구는 한시간이나 늦을때도 있어.
    B: Ya, nae chinguneun hansiganina neujeulttaedo isseo.
    B: “Hey, my friend sometimes is late for one hour.”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you say “ten minutes” in Korean?

  1. 삼십오분 (samsibobun)
  2. 십분 (sipbun)
  3. 사십이분 (sasibibun)
  4. 오십구분 (osipgubun)

Q2. How do you say “fifty-nine minutes” in Korean?

  1. 오분 (obun)
  2. 십분 (sipbun)
  3. 오십구분 (osipgubun)
  4. 사십이분 (sasibibun)

Q3. How do you say “minute(s)” in Korean?

  1. 년 (nyeon)
  2. 일 (il)
  3. 시간 (sigan)
  4. 분 (bun)

Answers:

Q1. -> 2
Q2. -> 3
Q3. -> 4


7. How to Say the Seconds in Korean

Numbers

“Second” is 초 (cho) in Korean. Let’s have a look at the table below to practice how to say different “second(s)” in Korean.

Korean Romanization Translation
1초 (일초) ilcho “One second”
5초 (오초) ocho “Five seconds”
13초 (십삼초) sipsamcho “Thirteen seconds”
26초 (이십육초) isibyukcho “Twenty-six seconds”
30초 (삼십초) samsipcho “Thirty seconds”
37초 (삼십칠초) samsipchilcho “Thirty-seven seconds”
44초 (사십사초) sasipsacho “Forty-four seconds”
52초 (오십이초) osibicho “Fifty-two seconds”
59초 (오십구초) osipgucho “Fifty-nine seconds”

Examples:

  • A: 1분은 총 몇 초게?
    A: Ilbuneun chong myeot choge?
    A: “How many seconds in one minute?”

    B: 60초!
    B: Yuksipcho!
    B: “Sixty seconds!”

  • A: 10 초안에 이 문제 풀 수 있겠어?
    A: Sip choane i munje pul su itgesseo?
    A: “Can you solve this problem in ten seconds?”

    B:뭐라고? 말도 안돼!
    B: Mworago? Maldo andwae!
    B: “What? That’s nonsense!”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you write “second(s)” in Korean?

  1. 분 (bun)
  2. 년 (nyeon)
  3. 초 (cho)
  4. 일 (il)

Q2. How do you write “one minute” in Korean?

  1. 일초 (ilcho)
  2. 이초 (icho)
  3. 삼초 (samcho)
  4. 사초 (sacho)

Q3. How do you say “sixty seconds” in Korean?

  1. 오십육초 (osibyukcho)
  2. 십오초 (sibocho)
  3. 이십이초 (isibicho)
  4. 육십초 (yuksipcho)

Answers:

Q1. -> 3
Q2. -> 1
Q3. -> 4


8. How to Say Other Time-related Words

Korean Romanization Translation
평일 pyeongil “Weekdays”
주말 jumal “Weekend(s)”
골든위크 goldeunwikeu “Golden Week”
샌드위치 데이* saendeuwichi dei “Sandwich Day”
어제 eoje “Yesterday”
오늘 oneul “Today”
내일 naeil “Tomorrow”
엊그저께 eotgeujeokke “A few days ago”
그저께 geujeokke “The day before yesterday”
내일모레 naeilmore “The day after tomorrow”

Examples:

  • A: BTS 콘서트 언제였지? 갑자기 기억이 안나네.
    A: Bitieseu konseoteu eonjeyeotji? Gapjagi gieogi annane.
    A: “When was the BTS concert? I can’t remember suddenly.”

    B: 잠깐만… 8월8일이니깐… 어머, 내일모레네!
    B: Jamkkanman… parwolparirinikkan… eomeo, naeilmorene!
    B: “Hold on… It’s on the 8th of August…oh my goodness, it’s in two days!”

  • A: 나 엊그저께 친구 결혼식 갔다 왔는데, 둘이 너무 행복해 보였어.
    A: Na eotgeujeokke chingu gyeolhonsik gatda wanneunde, duri neomu haengbokae boyeosseo.
    A: “I went to my friend’s wedding a few days ago and they both looked really happy.”

    B: 난 주말에 결혼식 가야 해.
    B: Nan jumare gyeolhonsik gaya hae.
    B: “I have to go to a wedding this weekend.”

Quiz:

Q1. How do you say “yesterday” in Korean?

  1. 골든위크 (goldeunwikeu)
  2. 어제 (eoje)
  3. 샌드위치 데이 (saendeuwichi dei)
  4. 엊그저께 (eotgeujeokke)

Q2. How do you say “the day before yesterday” in Korean?

  1. 내일모레 (naeilmore)
  2. 어제 (eoje)
  3. 그저께 (geujeokke)
  4. 오늘 (oneul)

Q3. How do you say “today” in Korean?

  1. 오늘 (oneul)
  2. 엊그저께 (eotgeujeokke)
  3. 어제 (eoje)
  4. 그저께 (geujeokke)

Answers:

Q1. -> 2
Q2. -> 3
Q3. -> 1

A Small Whipped Cupcake with a Candle


9. Interesting Korean Celebration Days

Did you know that every month there’s at least one event happening? Korea has many interesting days of celebration and they’re fun to participate in, especially if you’re in a relationship or dating someone. Let’s have a look at some of the most popular celebration days in South Korea:

Korean Romanization Translation Meaning
다이어리 데이 (1월 14일)           daieori dei “Diary Day”

It’s the day that couples give each other their diaries.
발렌타인 데이 (2월 14일)           ballentain dei “Valentine’s Day” It’s the day that couples give each other chocolate.
삼겹살 데이 (3월3일)           samgyeopsal dei “Samgyeopsal Day” It’s the day to eat Samgyupsal with someone you like.
화이트 데이 (3월 14일)           hwaiteu dei “White Day” It’s the day that couples give each other candy.
블랙 데이 (4월 14일)           beullaek dei “Black Day” It’s the day to eat Jjajang noodles if you haven’t received any chocolates or candies from anyone.
로즈 데이 (5월 14일)           rojeu dei “Rose Day” It’s the day to give a rose to your gf/bf.
키스 데이 (6월 14일)           kiseu dei “Kiss Day” It’s the day to give a kiss to your gf/bf.
실버 데이 (7월 14일)           silbeo dei “Silver Day” It’s the day to exchange a silver ring with your gf/bf.
그린 데이 (8월 14일)           geurin dei “Green Day” It’s the day to walk through the woods with your gf/bf.
치킨 데이 (9월 9일)           chikin dei “Chicken Day” It’s the day to eat some fried chicken with someone you like.
포토 데이 (9월 14일)           poto dei “Photo Day” It’s the day to take pictures with your gf/bf.
와인 데이 (10월 14일)           wain dei “Wine Day” It’s the day to drink some wine with your gf/bf.
무비 데이 (11월 14일)           mubi dei “Movie Day” It’s the day to watch a film with your gf/bf.
허그 데이 (12월 14일)           heogeu dei “Hug Day” It’s the day to give a hug to your gf/bf.


10. Let’s Practice

Knowing how to discuss various time frames is important when making a reservation. Let’s imagine that you’re trying to make a reservation at a fancy restaurant to celebrate your engagement with your fiance.

Situation:

  • Concierge: 한국호텔입니다. 무엇을 도와드릴까요?
    Concierge: Hangukoterimnida. Mueoseul dowadeurilkkayo?
    Concierge: “This is a Korean hotel. How may I help you?”
  • You: 여보세요, 예약하고 싶은데요.
    You: Yeoboseyo, yeyakago sipeundeyo.
    You: “Hello, I would like to make a reservation please.”
  • Concierge: 네, 언제로 해드릴까요?
    Concierge: Ne, eonjero haedeurilkkayo?
    Concierge: “Sure, when would you like to come?”
  • You: 12월 25일 오후 7시 가능한가요?
    You: Sibiwol isiboiril ohu ilgopsi ganeunghangayo?
    You: Is it possible on the 25th of December at seven o’clock in the evening?”
  • Concierge: 확인해보겠습니다. 죄송하지만 12월 25일은 예약이 꽉 차 있습니다. 다른 날은 어떠신가요.
    Concierge: Hwaginhaebogetseumnida. Joesonghajiman 12wol 25ireun yeyagi kkwak cha itseumnida. Dareun nareun eotteosingayo.
    Concierge: “Let me check it now. I am sorry but it’s full. How about other dates?”
  • You: 아 그래요? 그럼 12월 26일 오후 7시는 가능한가요?
    You: A geuraeyo? Geureom sibiworwol isibyugil ohu ilgopsineun ganeunghangayo?
    You: “Oh really? How about on the 26th of December at seven in the evening?”
  • Concierge: 네 가능합니다. 예약 잡아 드릴까요?
    Concierge: Ne ganeunghamnida. Yeyak jaba deurilkkayo?
    Concierge: “Yes you can. Do you want me to save the room for you?”
  • You: 네, 잡아주세요.
    You: Ne, jabajuseyo.
    You: “Yes please.”
  • Concierge: 성함과 전화번호 알려주시겠습니까?
    Concierge: Seonghamgwa jeonhwabeonho allyeojusigetseumnikka?
    Concierge: “May I have your name and your number please?”

Korean Landmark


11. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Korean

We hope you found this blog very informative, and that we helped you learn Korean dates and time! KoreanClass101 has many free online classes and even on online forum to discuss lessons with fellow students. You’ll also find an array of blog posts like this one, and can even learn Korean with your own personal Korean teacher by upgrading your account to Premium Plus. So do check out our website, and have a great day!

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Essential Korean Language for Travel that You Must Know

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Are you planning to travel to Korea? Korean travel phrases in language-learning are absolutely essential for just this reason!

Learning basic South Korean travel phrases will definitely help you in nearly any situation, including urgent ones. The Korean travel phrases and Korean travel words you’ll learn in this article will make your travels more fun and help you connect with locals, so that you can get the most out of your upcoming trip to South Korea!

Table of Contents

  1. Essential Korean Travel Phrases: Basic Expressions
  2. Essential Korean Phrases: Transportation
  3. Essential Korean Phrases: Shopping
  4. Essential Korean Phrases: At Restaurants
  5. Essential Korean Phrases: Asking for and Giving Directions
  6. Essential Korean Phrases: Emergencies
  7. Essential Korean Phrases: Flattery Phrases
  8. Essential Korean Phrases: Useful Phrases to Go Through Language Problems
  9. Essential Korean Phrases: Buying Tickets at a Museum
  10. Essential Korean Phrases: Taking Pictures
  11. How KoreanClass101.com Can Help You with Korean

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1. Essential Korean Travel Phrases: Basic Expressions

Preparing For Travel

You’ll be able to converse with local native Koreans by simply remembering these basic phrases. Koreans will appreciate the fact that you made the effort to speak to them in their local language, and it will certainly add more fun to your South Korea trip.

1- 안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo) - “hello” (polite form)

This is one of the most basic and commonly used Korean phrases for travelling, so be sure to keep it in your arsenal!

Example 1:
You enter a restaurant and a waitress greets you.

  • Waitress: 안녕하세요.
    Waitress: Annyeonghaseyo.
    Waitress: “Hello.”
  • You: 안녕하세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo.
    You: “Hello.”

Example 2:
You take a taxi and want to greet the taxi driver.

  • You: 안녕하세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo.
    You: “Hello.”
  • Taxi driver: 네, 안녕하세요. 어디로 가시나요?
    Taxi driver: Ne, annyeonghaseyo. Eodiro gasinayo?
    Taxi driver: “Yes, hello. Where would you like to go?”

2 - 반갑습니다 (bangapseumnida) - “nice to meet you” (polite form)

Example 1:
Jason went to your friend’s house and met their roommate, who is older than him, for the first time.

  • Roommate: 어? 친구 데려왔어? 누구야?
    Roommate: Eo? Chingu deryeowasseo? Nuguya?
    Roommate: “Oh, you brought your friend home? Who is he?”
  • Jason: 안녕하세요, 반갑습니다.
    Jason: Annyeonghaseyo, bangapseumnida.
    Jason: “Hello, nice to meet you.”

Example 2:
Michael went to a language exchange event in Hongdae and wants to introduce himself to others.

  • Michael: 안녕하세요, 저는 마이클이라고 합니다. 반갑습니다.
    Michael: Annyeonghaseyo, jeoneun maikeurirago hamnida. Bangapseumnida.
    Michael: “Hello, my name is Michael. Nice to meet you.”

3 - 감사합니다 (gamsahamnida) - “thank you” (polite form)

Example 1:
You’re walking in the busy streets in the Gangnam area, and see a lady drop her wallet. You pick it up and give it to her.

  • You: 여기, 지갑 떨어뜨리셨어요.
    You: Yeogi, jigap tteoreotteurisyeosseoyo.
    You: “Here, you dropped your wallet.”
  • Lady: 어머, 감사합니다.
    Lady: Eomeo, gamsahamnida.
    Lady: “Oh, thank you so much.”

Example 2:
You order a cup of coffee at The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf and a clerk gives you the change after you’ve paid.

  • Clerk: 500원 거스름돈 드리겠습니다.
    Clerk: Obaegwon geoseureumdon deurigetseumnida.
    Clerk: “Here is [your] change, 500 won.”
  • You: 감사합니다.
    You: Gamsahamnida.
    You: “Thank you.”

4 - 실례합니다 (sillyehamnida) - “excuse me” (polite form)

This is one of the most useful Korean travel phrases you can learn, so keep it in mind.

Example 1:
You’re on a crowded subway and need to get closer to the exit.

  • You: 실례합니다. 지나가겠습니다.
    You: Sillyehamnida. Jinagagetseumnida.
    You: “Excuse me. Passing through.”

Example 2:
You accidentally stepped on a stranger’s foot inside the busy subway.

  • You: 실례합니다.
    You: Sillyehamnida.
    You: “Excuse me.”

5- 네; 아니요; 괜찮아요. (ne; aniyo; gwaenchanayo.) - “yes; no; no, thank you.”

While you learn Korean travel phrases, never underestimate the importance of even the smallest words. They can have the most impact!

Example 1:

  • You: 이쪽으로 가면 화장실인가요?
    You: Ijjogeuro gamyeon hwajangsiringayo?
    You: “Is this way to the toilet?”
  • Clerk: 아니요, 그쪽은 창고예요.
    Clerk: Aniyo, geujjogeun changgoyeyo.
    Clerk: “No, that’s the storage section.”
  • You: 아, 그럼 저쪽으로 가면 되나요?
    You: A, geureom jeojjogeuro gamyeon doenayo?
    You: “Ah, so should I go that way?”
  • Clerk: 네, 맞아요.
    Clerk: Ne, majayo.
    Clerk: “Yes, correct.”

Example 2:
You had a great time hanging out with your friend. But it’s getting late—time to go home.

  • Friend: 많이 어두워졌네, 집에 데려다 줄까?
    Friend: Mani eoduwojyeonne, jibe deryeoda julkka?
    Friend: “It became really dark. Did you want me to take you to your home?”
  • You: 아니, 괜찮아. 혼자갈 수 있어.
    You: Ani, gwaenchana. Honjagal su isseo.
    You: “No, I’m fine. I can go home by myself.”

We have more free lessons like “Top 10 Conversational Phrases,” so do check out this page when you have time.


2. Essential Korean Phrases: Transportation

Airplane Phrases

Traveling by public transportation is the most efficient way to get around South Korea. The fares for the subway and public buses are very cheap, and the routes are easy to understand. There are also announcements offered in various languages, so the chance of getting lost is slim.

However, you need to remember that most of the staff at the ticket booths don’t speak English. Let’s learn the most important and useful phrases for buying tickets and conversing with any staff that you encounter.

1- ~으로 가는 티켓 주세요. (~euro ganeun tiket juseyo.)

~으로 가는 티켓 주세요. (~euro ganeun tiket juseyo.) means “Please give me a ticket to ~.” Use this phrase to buy any tickets to go out of the city area.

Example 1:
You’re at Dong-Daegu train station (동대구역; dongdaeguyeok) to buy a train ticket to Busan.

  • You: 부산으로 가는 티켓 주세요.
    You: Busaneuro ganeun tiket juseyo
    You: “I would like to buy a ticket to go to Busan.”
  • Staff: 출발시간은 언제가 괜찮으십니까?
    Staff: Chulbalsiganeun eonjega gwaenchaneusimnikka?
    Staff: “When would you like to depart?”
  • You: 오후 1시쯤 출발하는 기차 있을까요?
    You: Ohu 1sijjeum chulbalhaneun gicha isseulkkayo?
    You: “Are there any trains that depart at 13:00 (one o’clock PM)?”

Example 2:
You’re at the Seoul Express Bus Terminal to buy a bus ticket to Pohang (포항; pohang).

  • You: 안녕하세요, 오후 1시 포항으로 가는 티켓 주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, ohu 1si pohangeuro ganeun tiket juseyo.
    You: “Hello, I would like to buy a ticket to go to Pohang at 13:00 (one o’clock PM).”
  • Staff: 네, 몇장 드리면 될까요?
    Staff: Ne, myeotjang deurimyeon doelkkayo?
    Staff: “Okay, how many tickets do you need?”
  • You: 한장이요.
    You: Hanjangiyo.
    You: “Just one.”

2- ~으로 가는 전철/버스 인가요? (~euro ganeun jeoncheol/beoseu ingayo?)

This phrase means “Does this subway/bus go to ~?”

It’s likely that you’ll take a bus or subway to get around in South Korea. This travel phrase will come in handy when you want to ask a question to locals. When you travel by boat or ferry, simply replace the noun with “boat” (배; bae).

Example 1:
You’re at the Incheon airport and need to go to the Jamsil area. A bus stops in front of you, and you want to ask whether this bus goes to Jamsil.

  • You: 잠실로 가는 버스인가요?
    You: Jamsillo ganeun beoseuingayo?
    You: “Does this bus go to Jamsil?”
  • Staff: 네, 갑니다.
    Staff: Ne, gamnida.
    Staff: “Yes, it does.”

Example 2:
You’re at Gukje market in Busan and you need to catch the subway to go to Gimhae International airport.

  • You: 실례합니다. 이 전철은 부산 공항으로 가는 전철인가요?
    You: Sillyehamnida. i jeoncheoreun busan gonghangeuro ganeun jeoncheoringayo?
    You: “Excuse me. Does this subway go to the Busan airport?”
  • Stranger: 아니요, 부산 공항으로 가는 전철은 저쪽이예요.
    Stranger: Aniyo, busan gonghangeuro ganeun jeoncheoreun jeojjogiyeyo.
    Stranger: “No, the subway bound for the Busan airport is over there.”
  • You: 감사합니다.
    You: Gamsahamnida.
    You: “Thank you.”

3- ~으로 가주세요. (~euro gajuseyo.)

This phrase means “Please take me to ~.”

This travel phrase is the most effective and simple phrase to tell your taxi driver. Simply add the destination that you want to reach, such as “Insadong” (인사동; insadong) or “Dongdaemun” (동대문; dongdaemun) etc., followed by 으로 가주세요. (~euro gajuseyo.). That’s it. You don’t need to say anything else!

However, if you want to go somewhere less touristy, and it requires you to explain where exactly you want to go, give the taxi driver the address. Every taxi has a navigation system installed. Also, taxi companies provide free interpreter services in South Korea.

To know whether the taxi you got in offers this service, take a look on the right-hand side of the door. Usually, there’s a large rectangular sign that explains about this service in English, Japanese, and Chinese. So if you’re struggling to explain where you want to go, simply say “free interpreter” to the taxi driver.

Example 1:
You’re at “Gangnam station” (강남역; gangnamyeok) right now and want to move to “Itaewon” (이태원; itaewon) to have dinner with your friends.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 이태원역으로 가주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, itaewonyeogeuro gajuseyo.
    You: “Hello, please take me to Itaewon station.”
  • Taxi driver: 네, 알겠습니다.
    Taxi driver: Ne, algetseumnida.
    Taxi driver: “Sure.”

Example 2:
You want to visit your friend’s house in Busan, and you have his address.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 이곳으로 가고 싶은데요.. (주소를 보여줌)
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, igoseuro gago sipeundeyo.. (jusoreul boyeojum)
    You: “Hello, I would like to go to this place…” (show him the address)
  • Taxi driver: 잠시만요. (네비게이션으로 주소 확인함)
    Taxi driver: Jamsimanyo. (nebigeisyeoneuro juso hwaginham)
    Taxi driver: “Please hold on…” (checks the location via navigation system)


3. Essential Korean Phrases: Shopping

Basic Questions

1 - 이거/저것 얼마예요? (igeo/jeogeot eolmayeyo?)

This phrase means “How much is this/that?”

Use this travel phrase when you want to ask the seller how much the items cost while shopping in South Korea. To get the seller’s attention, you can say 저기요 (jeogiyo) which means “excuse me.” If the seller is male, you can call him by 아저씨 (ajeossi) meaning “mature man,” and if the seller is female, you can call her by 아줌마 (ajumma) meaning “matured female” or 이모 (imo) meaning “aunt.”

Also, remember that 이것 (igeot) means “this” and 저것 (jeogeot) means “that.” If you want each of them to be plural, say 이것들 (igeotdeul) meaning “these” and 저것들 (jeogeotdeul) meaning “those.”

Example 1:
You’re shopping at a famous market called “Gwangjang market” (광장시장; Gwangjangsijang), in Seoul. You found a set of Korean traditional clothing called “Hanbok” (한복; hanbok) which you want to buy, and you’re curious to know how much it costs.

  • You: 아저씨, 이거 얼마에요?
    You: Ajeossi, igeo eolmaeyo?
    You: “Excuse me sir, how much is this?”
  • Seller: 7만원이에요.
    Seller: Chilmanwonieyo.
    Seller: “It’s 70,000 won.”

Example 2:
You found a pink sweater that you like while shopping at 서문시장 (seomun sijang) in Daegu. You want to ask how much the sweater costs.

  • You: 저기요, 저건 얼마예요?
    You: jeogiyo, jeogeon eolmayeyo?
    You: “Excuse me, how much is that?”
  • Seller: 2만9천원이예요.
    Seller: Imangucheonwoniyeyo.
    Seller: “It’s 29,000 won.”
  • You: (저거) 한개 주세요.
    You: (jeogeo) Hangae juseyo.
    You: “Please give me one (of that).”

2 - 이거 #개 주세요. (igeo #gae juseyo.)

This phrase means “Please give me [number] [of the product].”

Example 1:
You’re at the supermarket and the clerk wants to ask how many plastic bags you want.

  • Seller: 비닐봉지 몇개 드릴까요?
    Seller: Binilbongji myeotgae deurilkkayo?
    Seller: “How many plastic bags would you like to have?”
  • You: 2개 주세요.
    You: Dugae juseyo.
    You: “Two please.”

Example 2:
You found a beautiful “Korean traditional pocket” called 전통 주머니 (jeontong jumeoni) and want to buy six of them.

  • You: 이거 6개 주세요.
    You: Igeo yeoseotgae juseyo.
    You: “Please give me six (of the Korean traditional pockets).”
  • Seller: 네.
    Seller: Ne.
    Seller: “Ok.”

On our website, KoreanClass101, you can find many lessons on counting numbers in Korean. Feel free to check out our website whenever you want.

3- 조금만 깎아 주시면 안될까요? (Jogeumman kkakka jusimyeon andoelkkayo?)

This phrase means “Can you please reduce the price?”

The prices in Korea are usually fixed, but you can definitely negotiate the price at a market. To ask for a discount, use this phrase!

If you want to buy items for a cheaper price in Korea, try to pay by cash. If you pay with a credit card, you’ll be charged extra (approximately ten percent more).

Example 1:
You’re at 남대문시장 (Namdaemun sijang) meaning “Namdaemun market” in Seoul and found a nice jacket. You ask for the price and think that it costs too much. You want to negotiate the price.

  • You: 너무 이쁘긴한데… 비싸네요. 조금만 깎아 주시면 안될까요?
    You: Neomu ippeuginhande… bissaneyo. Jogeumman kkakka jusimyeon andoelkkayo?
    You: “It’s really pretty…but it’s expensive. Can you please reduce the price a bit?”
  • Seller: 그럼 3,000원만 깎아 줄게요.
    Seller: Geureom samcheonwonman kkakka julgeyo.
    Seller: “I will give you a discount of 3,000 won then.”

Example 2:
You’re at 고속터미널 역 지하상가 (gosokteomineol yeok jihasangga) an underground shopping mall in the Express Bus Terminal station in Seoul, and want to buy a pair of jeans. The sign says that it costs 10,000 won if you pay by cash. But you only have a credit card.

  • You: 이거 카드로 계산할게요.
    You: Igeo kadeuro gyesanhalgeyo.
    You: “I will pay by credit card.”
  • Seller: 카드로 계산하면 11,000원이에요. 현금으로 내는게 더 저렴해요.
    Seller: kadeuro gyesanhamyeon mancheonwonieyo. hyeongeumeuro naeneun ge deo jeoryeomhaeyo.
    Seller: “If you pay by card, it will be 11,000 won. It will be cheaper by cash.”
  • You: 아 그래요? 이곳에 가장 가까운 ATM기계는 어디에 있나요?
    You: Igose gajang gakkaun ATMgigyeneun eodie innayo?
    You: “Oh really? Where is the nearest ATM from here?”

4- S/M/L 사이즈 있나요? (S/M/L saijeu innayo?)

This phrase means “Do you have S/M/L size for this?”

When you ask for a different size, if a seller says it’s 프리사이즈 (peurisaijeu), this means that it’s “free-size.” Do be careful when you buy free-size clothing, as it may be too big or small when you try it on. Also, for many shops at a market or an underground shopping area, you can’t refund the items after purchase.

Example 1:
You’re at an underground shopping mall in Gangnam station. You find a sweater and there’s no size written on the tag.

  • You: 이건 사이즈가 어떻게 돼요?
    You: Igeon saijeuga eotteoke dwaeyo?
    You: “What size is this?”
  • Seller: 그거 프리사이즈에요.
    Seller: Geugeo peurisaijeueyo.
    Seller: “It’s a free-size sweater.”

Example 2:
You want to ask if the dress you chose comes in different sizes.

  • You: 이 드레스 M 사이즈도 있나요?
    You: I deureseu em saijeudo innayo?
    You: “Do you have an M size?”
  • Seller: 네, 잠시만요.
    Seller: Ne, jamsimanyo.
    Seller: “Yes, hold on a sec.”

5- 뭐가 제일 인기 많아요? (mwoga jeil ingi manayo?)

This phrase means “What are the most popular ones?”

Sometimes it can be overwhelming when you need to choose something out of so many goods. If you’re not sure which one to choose, it’s always safe to ask a seller which item is popular these days.

Example 1:
You bought a number of items at a shop and a seller wants to give you some freebies.

  • You: 너무 이쁜것들이 많아서 못 고르겠어요. 어떤 것이 제일 인기가 많아요?
    You: Neomu ippeungeotdeuri manaseo mot goreugesseoyo. eotteon geosi jeil ingiga manayo?
    You: “There are so many things that I can’t choose. What is the most popular one from here?”
  • Seller: 요즘은 이 아이템이 한국에서 인기가 많아요.
    Seller: Yojeumeun i aitemi hangugeseo ingiga manayo.
    Seller: “These days, this item is quite popular in Korea.”

Example 2:
You want to buy a dress that’s trending in Korea.

  • You: 어느 드레스가 제일 인기 많아요?
    You: Eoneu deureseuga jeil ingi manayo?
    You: “Which dress is the most popular dress in Korea?”
  • Seller: 이거요.
    Seller: Igeoyo.
    Seller: “This one.”

Do you want more phrases for shopping? Check out “15 Shopping Phrases. Exchanges, Refunds and Complaints!” on KoreanClass101.com.

Korean Dishes In Silver Plates


4. Essential Korean Phrases: At Restaurants

1- ~주세요 (~Juseyo)

This phrase means “Please give me ~,” and it can be used not only to order dishes, but also to buy things like tickets or clothing.

Example 1:
You enter a restaurant and want to ask for a menu.

  • You: 저기요, 메뉴주세요.
    You: Jeogiyo, menyujuseyo.
    You: “Excuse me, please give me a menu.”
  • Waitress: 네, 여기있습니다.
    Waitress: Ne, yeogiitseumnida.
    Waitress: “Sure, here you go.”

Example 2:
You want to order a bottle of beer and soju to try to make 소맥 (somaek) which is a whiskey and beer cocktail.

  • You: 저기요, 맥주 한병이랑 소주 한병 주세요.
    You: Jeogiyo, maekju hanbyeongirang soju hanbyeong juseyo.
    You: “Excuse me, can I please have a bottle of beer and soju?”
  • Waitress:네, 여기있습니다.
    Waitress: Ne, yeogiitseumnida.
    Waitress: “Sure, here you go.”

2- 많이 매운가요? (Mani maeungayo?)

This phrase means “Is this spicy?”

Many Korean dishes are spicy for foreigners because we use 고추장 (Gochujang) meaning “red chili paste” or 고춧가루 (gochutgaru) meaning “chili powder” in most dishes. When ordering spicy dishes in Korea, you can request to make it less spicy, so you can still enjoy Korean dishes!

Example 1:
You’re at one of the famous ddeokbokki restaurants named 죠스떡볶이 (jyoseutteokbokki). It’s your first time trying some ddeokbokki.

  • You: 떡볶이 주세요.
    You: Tteokbokki juseyo.
    You: “I will have ddeokbokki please.”
  • Waitress: 매운 거 잘 못 드시면 많이 매우실 텐데요.
    Waitress: Maeun geo jal mot deusimyeon mani maeusil tendeyo.
    Waitress: “If you struggle a lot to eat spicy foods, you may not be able to eat this dish.”
  • You: 아, 많이 매운가요? 그럼 덜 맵게 해주시겠어요?
    You: A, mani maeungayo? geureom deol maepge haejusigesseoyo?
    You: “Ah, is it really that spicy? Is it possible to make it less spicy?”

Example 2:
You want to ask whether the dish you want to order is spicy or not.

  • You: 이거 많이 매운가요?
    You: Igeo mani maeungayo?
    You: “Is this spicy?”
  • Waiter: 아니요, 맵지 않습니다.
    Waiter: Aniyo, maepji anseumnida.
    Waiter: “No, it’s not spicy.”

3- 저는 채식주의자예요. (Jeoneun chaesikjuuijayeyo)

This important phrase means “I am a vegetarian.”

“Vegetarian” is 채식주의자 (chaesikjuuija) and “vegan” is 비건 (bigeon) in Korean. Although the number of vegetarian restaurants is increasing, this concept (especially veganism) is fairly new to South Korea. Therefore, do research in advance if you’re after specific vegetarian/vegan restaurants in Korea.

Otherwise, vegetarian dishes are easy to find, so don’t worry too much. Classic dishes include 야채 김밥 (vegetable gimbap) and 잡채 (japchae).

Example 1:
You’re at a gimbap restaurant and want to order a vegetarian gimbap.

  • You: 저는 채식주의자예요. 어떤 김밥을 먹으면 될까요?
    You: Jeoneun chaesikjuuijayeyo. eotteon gimbabeul meogeumyeon doelkkayo?
    You: “I am vegetarian. Is there any gimbap for me to eat?”
  • Staff: 채식주의자세요? 그럼 야채 김밥 드셔야겠네요.
    Staff: Chaesikjuuijaseyo? geureom yachae gimbap deusyeoyagenneyo.
    Staff: “Are you vegetarian? Then you should order the vegetable gimbap.”

Example 2:
You went to a restaurant with your friend, who doesn’t know that you’re vegetarian. He wants to order 삼겹살 (samgyeopsal) or “pork belly.”

  • Friend: 우리 삼겹살 시켜먹을까?
    Friend: Uri samgyeopsal sikyeomeogeulkka?
    Friend: “Shall we order some pork belly?”
  • You: 미안, 나 채식주의자야. 그래서 고기 못 먹어
    You: Mian, na chaesikjuuijaya. Geuraeseo gogi monmeogeo
    You: “Sorry, I’m vegetarian, so I can’t eat meat.”
  • Friend: 아 진짜? 몰랐네. 미안, 그럼 다른거 시켜먹자.
    Friend: A jinjja? mollanne. Mian, geureom dareungeo sikyeomeokja.
    Friend: “Oh really? I did not know. Sorry, let’s order something else.”

4- ~ 알러지있어요 (alleojiisseoyo) - “I am allergic to ~.”

This phrase means “I am allergic to ~,” and may be the most important restaurant phrase you learn today!

Are you allergic to peanuts? “Peanut” is called 땅콩 (ttangkong) in Korean. “Wheat” is called 밀 (mil).

To say that you’re allergic to something, just say the name of the food that you’re allergic to, followed by 알러지있어요 (alleojiisseoyo).

Example 1:
You’re allergic to peanuts and you want to ask if the snack you want to buy contains some nuts.

  • You: 제가 땅콩 알레르기가 있는데요, 이 과자 땅콩이 들어가 있나요?
    You: Jega ttangkong allereugiga inneundeyo, I gwaja ttangkongi deureoga innayo?
    You: “I am allergic to peanuts, I am wondering if this snack contains some peanuts?”
  • Staff: 확인해볼께요. 네, 들어가 있네요.
    Staff: Hwaginhaebolkkeyo. Ne, deureoga inneyo.
    Staff: “Let me have a check. Yes, it does.”

Example 2:
You’re currently staying with a Korean homestay family. The homestay father gave you chocolates and you want to say that you’re allergic to them.

  • You: 전 초콜릿에 알레르기가 있어서 먹을 때마다 기침을 해요.
    You: Jeon chokollise allereugiga isseoseo meogeul ttaemada gichimeul haeyo.
    You: “I am allergic to chocolates, so every time I eat I sneeze.”
  • Father: 그런데도 먹어?
    Father: Geureondedo meogeo?
    Father: “And you still eat chocolates?”
  • You: 네, 너무 맛이 있어서요.
    You: Ne, neomu masi isseoseoyo.
    You: “Yes, because it‘s too delicious. “

5- 와이파이 비밀번호는 뭐예요? (Waipai bimilbeonhoneun mwoyeyo?)

This phrase translates to “What is the password for Wifi?”

You’ll be startled at the speed of Internet services in South Korea. Moreover, free wifi services are available nearly everywhere—on the subway, KTX, at restaurants and cafes, etc. Most restaurants and cafes provide free wifi for customers, so ask for the password to access the free wifi.

Example 1:
You stopped by 엔제리너스커피 (Angel-in-Us Coffee) to take a break from a long walk, and you want to use free wifi.

  • You: 와이파이 비밀번호는 뭐예요?
    You: Waipai bimilbeonhoneun mwoyeyo?
    You: “What is the password for wifi?”
  • Waiter: 1234567890입니다.
    Waiter: I-ri-sam-sa-o-yuk-chil-pal-gu-yeong-imnida.
    Waiter: “It’s 1234567890.”
  • You: 감사합니다.
    You: Gamsahamnida.
    You: “Thank you.”

Do you want to learn more practical phrases to use at Korean restaurants? Check out “Vocabulary and Phrases for the Restaurant” on our website.

Navigating Through the Streets


5. Essential Korean Phrases: Asking for and Giving Directions

Survival Phrases

1- ___은 어떻게 가나요? (___eun eotteoke ganayo?)

This phrase translates as “How do I go to ~?” in English.

This is the phrase to use when you’re asking for detailed directions. Use this phrase to ask how to get somewhere, when there are many steps involved.

Example 1:
You’re asking your homestay father how to get to Busan from Daegu.

  • You: 부산에서 대구까지 어떻게 가나요?
    You: Busaneseo daegukkaji eotteoke ganayo?
    You: “How do I get to Busan from Daegu?”
  • Father: 부산역에서 KTX 열차 티켓을 하고나서…
    Father: Busanyeogeseo KTX yeolcha tikeseul hagonaseo…
    Father: “You need to buy a KTX ticket from a station called Busan station and ….”

2- ~은 어디에 있어요? (~eun eodie isseoyo?)

This phrase means “Where is ~?”

Example 1:
You’re at a shop and want to use the bathroom.

  • You: 화장실은 어디에 있어요?
    You: Hwajangsireun eodie isseoyo?
    You: “Where is the bathroom?”
  • Staff: 가게 밖으로 나가면 바로 오른쪽에 있어요.
    Staff: Gage bakkeuro nagamyeon baro oreunjjoge isseoyo.
    Staff: “Go out of the shop; the toilet is on the right-hand side.”

Example 2:
You feel tired after visiting many places and want to go back to the hotel to rest, but you’re not sure where the closest station is.

  • You: 여기서 가장 가까운 지하철역은 어디에 있어요?
    You: Yeogiseo gajang gakkaun jihacheollyeogeun eodie isseoyo?
    You: “Where is the closest subway station from here?”
  • Stranger: 횡단보도 건너면 홍대역이 보일거예요.
    Stranger: Hoengdanbodo geonneomyeon hongdaeyeogi boilgeoyeyo.
    Stranger: “Just cross the road and you’ll be able to see the station called Hongdae.”

3- Vocabulary for Directions

Here’s some useful vocabulary:

Vocabulary Romanization Translation
…쪽으로 …jjogeuro towards
마주보고 majubogo facing
옆에 yeope by
뒤에 dwie behind
오른쪽 oreunjjok right
왼쪽 oenjjok left

Reference: Position/Direction

There are several example sentences using these vocabulary words in our vocabulary list about positions and directions. Do check out the page for more learning material.

4- 여기는 어디인가요? (yeogineun eodiingayo?)

This phrase means “Where am I?”

When you’re not sure where you are, or you want to know the name of the place you’re at, use this phrase to ask. 어디 means “where” in Korean. If you want to double-check your location with someone, replace 어디 with the name of the place.

For example, if you want to know whether the place you’re in is 가로수길 (garosu-gil), you should ask 여기는 가로수길인가요? (yeogineun garosugiringayo?) which translates to “Am I in Garosu gil?”

Example 1:

  • You: 길을 잃었어요. 여기는 어디인가요?
    You: Gireul ileosseoyo. Yeogineun eodiingayo?
    You: “I am lost. Where am I?”
  • Stranger: 음… 어디로 가시는데요? 가는길 알려드릴께요.
    Stranger: Eum… eodiro gasineundeyo? Ganeungil allyeodeurilkkeyo.
    Stranger: “Hmm…where are you heading to? I may be able to tell you the way.”

Example 2:
You’re with a tour guide and you want to say how beautiful this place is.

  • You: 정말 아름다운 곳이네요. 여기는 어디인가요?
    You: Jeongmal areumdaun gosineyo. Yeogineun eodiingayo?
    You: “This place is really beautiful. Where is this place?”
  • Guide: 광화문이라고 하는 곳입니다. 아름답지요?
    Guide: Gwanghwamunirago haneun gosimnida. Areumdapjiyo?
    Guide: “It’s called Gwanghwamun. Isn’t it beautiful?”

5- 여기서 ~까지는 많이 먼가요/가까운가요? (yeogiseo ~kkajineun mani meongayo/gakkaungayo?)

This phrase means “From here to ~, is it far/close?”

Use this phrase when you want to ask how far or close something is from your current location.멀다 (meolda) is “far” and 가깝다 (gakkapda) is “close” in Korean. To make each word into a question, they become 먼가요? (meongayo) meaning “Is it far?” and 가까운가요? (gakkaungayo?) meaning “Is it close by?” respectively.

Example 1:
You’re at Daegu Station and want to go to Palgongsan, a tourist favorite in Daegu.

  • You: 팔공산은 여기서 많이 먼가요?
    You: Palgongsaneun yeogiseo mani meongayo?
    You: “Is Palgongsan far from here?”

Example 2:
You’ve just landed in Jeju International Airport. Your friend comes to pick you up and you’re waiting for a bus to go to your friend’s house.

  • You: (너의) 집은 여기서 많이 멀어?
    You: (neoui) Jibeun yeogiseo mani meoreo?
    You: “Is your house far from here?”
  • Friend: 음, 버스타고 한 20분 정도 가야해. 그렇게 멀진 않아.
    Friend: Eum, beoseutago han isipbun jeongdo gayahae. Geureoke meoljin ana.
    Friend: “Hmm, it takes about 20 minutes by bus. It’s not too far.”

Overflow of Water in a Village


6. Essential Korean Phrases: Emergencies

1- 도와주세요. (dowajuseyo.)

This phrase translates to “Please help me.”

When you’re in need of help, use this phrase to get people’s attention. Be careful when you use this phrase though, because the meaning changes depending on your intonation. You can also request help more formally by stating, 실례하지만 도와주시겠어요? (sillyehajiman dowajusigesseoyo?) which means “I am sorry to bother you, but could you please help?”

Example 1:
You were hiking at a mountain called 북한산 (bukansan) in Seoul and you injured yourself. You see a number of hikers not far from where you are.

  • You: 도와주세요! , 도와주세요!
    You: Dowajuseyo! Dowajuseyo!
    You: “Please help! Please help!”

Example 2:
You need to call an ambulance, and you go to a help desk for help.

  • You: 응급상황이예요, 도와주세요!
    You: Eunggeupsanghwangiyeyo, dowajuseyo!
    You: “It’s an emergency! Please help!”

2- 경찰 불러주세요. (gyeongchal bulleojuseyo.)

This phrase means “Please call the police.”

Use this phrase when you’re in danger. Alternatively, you can call the police by dialing 112. If you want to call an ambulance, which is called 응급차 (eunggeupcha) or 일일구 (irilgu), simply say the word followed by 불러주세요 (bulleojuseyo) meaning “Please call.”

Example 1:
You want to ask for help from a person at the service desk.

  • Help desk: 무엇을 도와드릴까요?
    Help desk: Mueoseul dowadeurilkkayo?
    Help desk: “How may I help you?”
  • You: 누가 지갑을 훔쳐갔어요, 경찰 불러주세요.
    You: Nuga jigabeul humchyeogasseoyo, gyeongchal bulleojuseyo.
    You: “My wallet is stolen and I would like to call the police.”
  • Help desk: 네, 지금 바로 하겠습니다.
    Help desk: Ne, jigeum baro hagetseumnida.
    Help desk: “Okay, will do it now.”

Example 2:
A stranger approaches you and tries to steal your bag.

  • You: 도와주세요! 누가 경찰 불러 주세요!
    You: Dowajuseyo! Nuga gyeongchal bulleo juseyo!
    You: “Please help! Call the police for me!”

3- ~를 다쳤어요. (~reul dachyeosseoyo.)

This phrase means “I injured my ~.”

When you visit a hospital, you need to be able to tell the doctor which part of your body is injured. Unless you go to an international hospital that offers a free interpreter service, you’ll need to speak basic Korean at a local hospital.

If you want to say that you’re just in pain, just say ~가 아파요. (~ga apayo) which means “I feel pain in my~.”

Here’s a vocabulary list of body parts for you to memorize:

Vocabulary Romanization Translation
머리 meori head
다리 dari leg(s)
손가락 songarak finger(s)
발목 balmok ankle(s)
무릎 mureup knee(s)
팔꿈치 palkkumchi elbow(s)
손목 sonmok wrist(s)
pal arm(s)

Reference: Body Parts, KoreanClass101 Vocabulary list

The vocabulary words above are just a small portion of the entire vocabulary list from KoreanClass101. If you want to check out the entire list, visit our Body Parts vocabulary list on our website. We also have many free lessons on describing body parts in Korean, so check our website for more.

Example 1:
You’re at a local hospital and need to explain which part of your body is injured.

  • Doctor: 무슨일로 오셨나요?
    Doctor: Museunillo osyeonnayo?
    Doctor: “What made you come here today?”
  • You: 산책하다가 발목을 다쳤어요.
    You: Sanchaekadaga balmogeul dachyeosseoyo.
    You: “I injured my ankle while walking.”
  • Doctor: 한번 살펴 보겠습니다.
    Doctor: Hanbeon salpyeo bogetseumnida.
    Doctor: “Let me have a look at your ankle.”

Example 2:
You weren’t cautious enough when crossing the pedestrian road. Unfortunately, you were run over by a car and your bone is broken.

  • You: 걸을 수가 없어요. 뼈를 다친것 같아요.
    You: Georeul suga eopseoyo. Ppyeoreul dachingeot gatayo.
    You: “I can’t walk. I think my bone is broken.”
  • Driver: (calling an ambulance) 여보세요, 차사고가 났는데요, 사람이 크게 다친것 같습니다.
    Driver: Yeoboseyo, chasagoga nanneundeyo, sarami keuge dachingeot gatseumnida.
    Driver: “Hello, there was a car accident and I think that the person is badly injured.”

4- 지갑/여권을 잃어버렸어요. (jigap/yeogwoneul ileobeoryeosseoyo.)

This phrase means “I lost my wallet/passport.”

Your wallet and passport are the most valuable items while traveling around the world, and you certainly don’t want to ruin your entire trip over missing items. Use this phrase when you want to say that you’ve lost your belongings.

Here’s a list of items that people may lose while traveling:

Vocabulary Romanization Translation
don money
티켓 tiket ticket
시계 sigye watch
악세사리 aksesari accessories
귀중품 gwijungpum valuable items

Example 1:
You’re about to head to the airport, and realize that your passport is missing.

  • You: 어머, 여권을 잃어버린것 같아.
    You: Eomeo, yeogwoneul ileobeoringeot gata.
    You: “Oh no, I think I lost my passport.”
  • Friend: 어디서 잃어버렸는데?
    Friend: Eodiseo ileobeoryeonneunde?
    Friend: “Where did you lose it?”

Example 2:

  • Friend: 어머, 지갑이 어디갔지?
    Friend: Eomeo, jigabi eodigatji?
    Friend: “Oh no, where is my wallet?”
  • You: 지갑을 잃어버렸어?
    You: Jigabeul ileobeoryeosseo?
    You: “Did you lose your wallet?”
  • Friend: 휴, 찾았다!
    Friend: Hyu, chajatda!
    Friend: “Phew, I found it!”

5- Emergency Numbers to Remember

These are numbers that come in handy when you’re in trouble:

  1. 112 - Police
  2. 119 - Ambulance
  3. 111 - National Security
  4. 113 - Reporting spies
  5. 182 - Missing persons

Here, you can learn more vocabulary and phrases: “Words and Phrases to Help You in an Emergency.”

A Group of Young People Chatting


7. Essential Korean Phrases: Flattery Phrases

1- 한국 음식을 좋아해요. (Hanguk eumsigeul joahaeyo.)

This phrase means “I like Korean food.”

Koreans tend to worry when they see foreigners eating spicy food—you’ll hear 너무 맵지 않나요? (neomu maepji annayo?) which is them asking you “Is it not too spicy for you?” or 조금 매운데, 괜찮아요? (jogeum maeunde, gwaenchanayo?) meaning “It’s a bit spicy, is this okay?” when you order a spicy dish.

Don’t worry too much when you hear this, because they’re actually complimenting you for trying Korean dishes and they really do hope that you enjoy the food.

To say a specific dish, just replace 한국 음식 (hanguk eumsik) meaning “Korean food” with the name of your favorite dish. For example, if you like 삼계탕 (samgyetang) or “ginseng chicken soup,” you can say 삼계탕(을) 좋아해요 (samgyetang(eul) joahaeyo). Let’s have a look at more examples below:

Example 1:

  • Friend: 어떤 음식 좋아해?
    Friend: Eotteon eumsik joahae?
    Friend: “What kind of cuisine do you like?”
  • You: 매운걸 좋아해서 한국 음식을 많이 좋아해.
    You: Maeungeol joahaeseo hanguk eumsigeul mani joahae.
    You: “I like spicy food, so I like Korean food very much.”
  • Friend: 잘됐다! 집근처에 맛집있는데, 같이 갈래?
    Friend: Jaldwaetda! jipgeuncheoe matjibinneunde, gachi gallae?
    Friend: “That’s great! There’s a good restaurant around here, do you want to go together?”

Example 2:

  • Elder person: 매운 음식 좋아해요?
    Elder person: Maeun eumsik joahaeyo?
    Elder person: “Do you like spicy food?”
  • You: 네, 좋아해요.
    You: Ne, joahaeyo.
    You: “Yes, I do.”

2- 한국문화에 관심이 많아요. (Hangungmunhwae gwansimi manayo.)

Use this phrase to say “I am interested in Korean culture.”

Has anyone ever asked you what made you become interested in Korea? ~에 관심이 많아요. (~e gwansimi manayo.) is a phrase to say that you “are interested in ~.” You can replace the first noun with something else, such as 한국 역사 (hanguk yeoksa) meaning “Korean history,” 케이팝 (keipap) meaning “K-pop,” 한국 드라마 (hanguk deurama) meaning “Korean drama,” and so forth.

Here are some examples:

Example 1:
Jamie is a new exchange student, and Sumi and Soyeon are talking.

  • 수미: 제이미가 왜 한국에 왔을까?
    Sumi: Jeimiga wae hanguge wasseulkka?
    Sumi: “I wonder what brought Jamie to South Korea.”
  • 소연: 한국문화에 관심이 많아서 여기로 왔데.
    Soyeon: Hangungmunhwae gwansimi manaseo yeogiro watde.
    Soyeon: “He is here because he is interested in Korean culture.”

Example 2:
Your friend asks why you’re interested in Korean culture. You want to say that you became interested in it after watching Korean dramas.

  • You: 한국 드라마를 좋아해서 한국문화에 관심이 많아요.
    You: Hanguk deuramareul joahaeseo hangungmunhwae gwansimi manayo.
    You: “I became interested in Korean culture because of Korean dramas.”

3- 한국 사람은 친절해요. (Hanguk sarameun chinjeolhaeyo.)

Use this phrase to say “Korean people are friendly.”

Koreans are friendly to tourists, so they will be happy to help you out when you’re in need of help. To say that Koreans are friendly, you can say 한국 사람은 친절해요 (Hanguk sarameun chinjeolhaeyo.).

Example 1:
A friend asked how your trip to Korea was. You want to compliment Korean people.

  • Friend: 한국 여행 어땠어?
    Friend: Hanguk yeohaeng eottaesseo?
    Friend: “How was your trip to Korea?”
  • You: 응, 재미있었어. 한국 사람은 정말 친절한것 같아.
    You: Eung, jaemiisseosseo. Hanguk sarameun jeongmal chinjeolhangeot gata.
    You: “Yeah, it was fun. Koreans are really friendly.”

Example 2:

  • You: 드라마를 보면 한국 사람들은 친절한것 같아.
    You: Deuramareul bomyeon hanguk saramdeureun chinjeolhangeot gata.
    You: “Based on Korean drama, I think that Koreans are friendly.”

4- 친구가 되고 싶어요. 페이스북/인스타그램 있어요? (chinguga doego sipeoyo. peiseubuk/inseutageuraem isseoyo?)

Use this phrase to say “I want to be your friend. Do you have a Facebook/Instagram?”

You’ll encounter many locals while traveling in South Korea. If you meet someone that you want to keep in touch with long-term, say this phrase.

Example 1:
You meet a local while traveling in Jeju and you want to keep in touch with her.

  • You: 친구가 되고 싶어요. 혹시 페이스북이나 인스타그램 있어요?
    You: Chinguga doego sipeoyo. hoksi peiseubugina inseutageuraem isseoyo?
    You: “I want to be your friend. Do you have a Facebook or Instagram by any chance?”
  • Friend: 페이스북은 없고, 인스타그램은 있어요.
    Friend: Peiseubugeun eopgo, inseutageuraemeun isseoyo.
    Friend: “I don’t have a Facebook account, but I use Instagram.”


8. Essential Korean Phrases: Useful Phrases to Go Through Language Problems

World Map

1- 영어 할 수 있어요? (Yeongeo hal su isseoyo?)

Use this phrase to ask someone “Can you speak English?”

Example 1:
A staff member is explaining something to you in Korean and you want to ask if they speak English.

  • You: 혹시 영어 할 수 있어요?
    You: Hoksi yeongeo hal su isseoyo?
    You: “Do you speak English by any chance?”
  • Staff: 죄송해요, 할수 없어요.
    Staff: Joesonghaeyo, halsu eopseoyo.
    Staff: “Sorry, no.”

2 - 적어주실래요? (jeogeojusillaeyo?)

This useful phrase means “Can you write it down?”

Example 1:
Your homestay mother suggests that you visit a museum called 전쟁기념관 (jeonjaengginyeomgwan) which is “The War Memorial of Korea,” in English. You want to search for this place on the Internet.

  • You: 전쟁기념관을 종이에 적어주실래요?
    You: Jeonjaengginyeomgwaneul jongie jeogeojusillaeyo?
    You: “Can you please write “The War Memorial of Korea” on the paper?”

Example 2:
A stranger is explaining the directions to go to 63 빌딩 (yuksam building) or the “63building, but it seems quite complicated.

  • You: 죄송하지만, 종이에 적어주실래요?
    You: Joesonghajiman, jongie jeogeojusillaeyo?
    You: “I am sorry, but could you please write the directions down?”

3- 죄송해요, 한국말 잘못해요. (Joesonghaeyo, hangungmal jalmothaeyo.)

Use this phrase to let someone know “I am sorry, I am not good at Korean.”

Example 1:
An elderly person approaches you with a smile and asks many questions in Korean. You want to say that you can’t speak Korean.

  • You: 죄송해요, 저는 한국말을 못해요.
    You: Joesonghaeyo, jeoneun hangungmareul mothaeyo.
    You: “I am sorry, I can’t speak Korean.”

Example 2:
A stranger approaches you and asks some questions in Korean. You want to understand what he’s saying.

  • You: 죄송해요, 한국말(을) 잘못해요. 조금 더 천천히 말해줄래요?
    You: Joesonghaeyo, hangungmal(eul) jalmothaeyo. Jogeum deo cheoncheonhi malhaejullaeyo?
    You: “Sorry, I am not good at Korean. Can you please speak slowly?”

4- 조금 더 천천히 말해주시겠어요? (jogeum deo cheoncheonhi malhaejusigesseoyo?)

This phrase, hinted at earlier, means “Can you please speak slowly?”

You may want to practice speaking in Korean as much as possible. However, sometimes you may struggle to understand the language, especially when someone speaks to you too quickly. Use this phrase to kindly ask a speaker to speak more slowly for you.

Example 1:
You’re on the phone to have food delivered. The staff member speaks too fast and you want him to slow down for you.

  • You: 죄송하지만, 조금 더 천천히 말해주시겠어요?
    You: Joesonghajiman, jogeum deo cheoncheonhi malhaejusigesseoyo?
    You: “I am sorry, but could you please slow down for me?”
  • Staff: 아, 죄송합니다.
    Staff: A, joesonghamnida.
    Staff: “Ah, I apologize.”

Example 2:
Your friend is upset about something and struggles to speak clearly.

    You: 미안, 너무 빨리 말을 해서 잘 못알아들었어. 조금만 더 천천히 말해줄래?
    You: Mian, neomu ppalli mareul haeseo jal mosaradeureosseo. Jogeumman deo cheoncheonhi malhaejullae?
    You: “Sorry, you spoke too fast so I didn’t quite catch you. Can you speak more slowly?”

5- 이것은 어떻게 읽나요? (Igeoseun eotteoke ingnayo?)

Use this phrase to ask someone “How do you read this?”

If you want to ask how to pronounce a word or sentence, say 이것은 어떻게 발음하나요? (Igeoseun eotteoke bareumhanayo?) or “How do I pronounce this?”

Example 1:

  • You: 이건 어떻게 읽어?
    You: Igeon eotteoke ilgeo?
    You: “How do I read this?”
  • Friend: 간장게장이라고 해.
    Friend: Ganjanggejangirago hae.
    Friend: “It is soy sauce raw crab.”

A Couple Looking at Paintings


9. Essential Korean Phrases: Buying Tickets at a Museum

1 - 성인 1장 주세요. (seongin hanjang juseyo.)

Use this phrase to say “One ticket (adult) please.”

There are many museums and exhibitions worth visiting in Korea. Most places, unless you go to a museum in a very rural area, offer pamphlets and free guides in many different languages, so you won’t have much trouble navigating.

However, since you’re a Korean learner, let’s learn some useful travel phrases!

Take a look at the column for the price at the Daerim museum. This is the typical column that you’ll see at any museum or exhibition that you go to in Korea. “Adult” in Korean is 성인 (seongin). “Children” is 어린이 (eorini) and “student” is 학생 (haksaeng).

Let’s take a look at two examples:

Example 1:
You arrive at 김치박물관 (gimchibangmulgwan) or “Museum Kimchikan.” You want to buy a ticket.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 성인 1장 주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, seongin hanjang juseyo.
    You: “Hello, one ticket (adult) please.”

Example 2:
You arrive at 전쟁기념관 (jeonjaengginyeomgwan) or “War Memorial of Korea.” You’re with your younger sister who is only fifteen years old.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 성인 1장이랑 어린이 1 장주세요.
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, seongin hanjangirang eorini hanjangjuseyo.
    You: “Hello, one adult and one child please.”

2- 팜플렛 주세요. (pampeullet juseyo)

Asking for pamphlets is easy too. You just need to use this phrase, which means “Please give me a pamphlet.” You’ll be able to get a pamphlet in many different languages at the counter.

Example 1:

  • Clerk: 몇장드릴까요.
    Clerk: Myeotjangdeurilkkayo.
    Clerk: “How many (tickets) would you like?”
  • You: 성인 1장 주세요.
    You: Seongin hanjang juseyo.
    You: “One adult, please.”
  • Clerk: 5,000원입니다. 팜플렛 필요하세요?
    Clerk: Ocheonwonimnida. Pampeullet pillyohaseyo?
    Clerk: “It’s 5,000 won. Do you need a pamphlet?”
  • You: 네, 영어 팜플렛 주세요.
    You: Ne, yeongeo pampeullet juseyo.
    You: “Yes, an English pamphlet please.”

3- 무료 가이드있나요? (muryo gaideuinnayo?)

Use this phrase to ask “Is there a free tour?”

Many museums offer free guides in English, Korean, Japanese, and Chinese. Some places only offer them once per day, or even once per month, so do check their schedule on their website in advance if you want to participate.

Example 1:

  • You: 이곳에 무료 가이드 있나요?
    You: Igose muryo gaideu innayo?
    You: “Is there a free tour?”
  • Clerk: 네, 오늘 오후 5시에 영어로 진행되는 무료 가이드 있습니다.
    Clerk: Ne, oneul ohu daseotsie yeongeoro jinhaengdoeneun muryo gaideu itseumnida.
    Clerk: “Yes, there is one in English at 17:00 (5 PM).”

4- 오늘 특별한 행사 하나요? (Oneul teukbyeolhan haengsa hanayo?)

Want to know if a museum has any special events? Use this phrase to ask a clerk. It translates to “Is there a special event?”

Example 1:
You hear loud music coming out of the museum.

  • You: 오늘 특별한 행사 하나요?
    You: Oneul teukbyeolhan haengsa hanayo?
    You: “Is there a special event?”
  • Clerk: 네, 방금 시작했어요.
    Clerk: Ne, banggeum sijakaesseoyo.
    Clerk: “Yes, it has just started.”

5- 오디오 가이드 있나요? (odio gaideu innayo?)

Use this phrase to ask “Is there an audio guide?”

Example 1:

  • You: 영어 오디오 가이드 있나요?
    You: Yeongeo odio gaideu innayo?
    You: “Is there an audio guide?”
  • Clerk: 네, 있습니다. 몇개 드릴까요?
    Clerk: Ne, itseumnida. myeotgae deurilkkayo?
    Clerk: “Yes, there is. How many would you like?”
  • You: 한 개 주세요.
    You: Han gae juseyo.
    You: “Just one, please.”

A Lady Holding a DSLR Camera


10. Essential Korean Phrases: Taking Pictures

1- 이곳은 사진 찍어도 괜찮은 장소인가요? (igoseun sajin jjigeodo gwaenchaneun jangsoingayo?)

Use this phrase to ask “Is it okay to take a picture in this place?”

You can take pictures most places, but it’s always safe to ask if you’re not sure.

Example 1:
You’re at the museum and want to ask if you can take pictures.

  • You: 이곳은 사진 찍어도 괜찮은 장소인가요?
    You: Igoseun sajin jjigeodo gwaenchaneun jangsoingayo?
    You: “Is it okay to take pictures here?”
  • Staff: 네, 플래시 없이 해주십시오.
    Staff: Ne, peullaesi eopsi haejusipsio.
    Staff: “Yes, but without flash please.”

2- 사진 같이 찍어요. (sajin gachi jjigeoyo.)

This phrase translates to “Let’s take a picture together.”

Use this phrase when you want to take a picture with someone. Alternatively, you can ask for permission by asking 사진 같이 찍어도 괜찮아요? (Sajin gachi jjigeodo gwaenchanayo?) meaning “Is it okay to take a picture with you?”

Example 1:

  • You: 사진 같이 찍어요.
    You: Sajin gachi jjigeoyo.
    You: “Let’s take a picture together.”
  • Friend: 좋아요.
    Friend: Joayo.
    Friend: “OK.”

3- 사진 찍어주시겠어요? (Sajin jjigeojusigesseoyo?)

This phrase means “Can you please take a picture of us?”

Example 1:
You’re traveling alone in 전주한옥마을 (jeonjuhanongmaeul) or “Jeonju Hanbok Village” and you want to ask someone to take a picture of you with a traditional Korean house in the background.

  • You: 죄송하지만, 사진 찍어주시겠어요?
    You: Joesonghajiman, sajin jjigeojusigesseoyo?
    You: “I am sorry to interrupt, but could you please take a picture of me?”
  • Stranger: 그럼요.
    Stranger: Geureomyo.
    Stranger: “Sure.”

Example 2:
You’re at 롯데월드 (rotdewoldeu) or “Lotte World” and want to ask someone to take a picture of you and your girlfriend.

  • You: 안녕하세요, 저희 사진 1장만 찍어주시겠어요?
    You: Annyeonghaseyo, jeohui sajin 1jangman jjigeojusigesseoyo?
    You: “Hello, could you please take a picture of us?”
  • Stranger: 그럼요.
    Stranger: Geureomyo.
    Stranger: “Sure.”

Someone Holding Miniature Korean Flag


11. How KoreanClass101.com Can Help You with Korean

If you have any questions regarding the travel phrases mentioned above (or other questions about Korean culture), we’ll be more than happy to answer them for you at the KoreanClass101.com forum. On our site, especially the forum, you can find tons of cultural insights and useful tips to help you study Korean. Feel free to check out the forum when you have time.

Also, KoreanClass101.com offers many free Korean lessons; you can access these lessons by simply creating a free lifetime account.

Learning Korean travel phrases, along with essential cultural information, is no easy task. But the more that you use Korean travel phrases, the easier it will get. Trust us!

We hope that you found this blog useful, and that you enjoy your trip to Korea! These basic Korean travel phrases for tourists will help you get around South Korea like it’s nothing. :)
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11 Ways to Say “I am Sorry” in Korean

“How can I say sorry in Korean?” you may be asking.

“Sorry” is one of the first words that language learners come across when starting out. It’s a practical word because you can use it in many situations. There are many different ways to say sorry in English, such as “I am sorry,” “I apologize,” and so on, and the same is true for Korean. Some Korean apologies are formal and some are slang words, and sometimes words are only used in a specific situation.

“Sorry” in learning Korean is just as essential as it is in any other language. In this blog, we’re going to introduce eleven ways to say “I am sorry” in Korean, and when to use an expression appropriately. There are many words for sorry in Korean vocabulary, as well as many common gestures that make up a big part of how to apologize in Korean culture. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Korean Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

  1. 죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.) - Formal
  2. 잘못했습니다. (jalmothaetseumnida.) - Formal
  3. 미안해요. (mianhaeyo.) - Formal
  4. 죄송해요. (joesonghaeyo.) - Formal.
  5. 미안해 (mianhae) - Informal
  6. 미안 (mian) - Informal
  7. 잠시만요. (jamsimanyo.) - Informal/Formal
  8. 실례합니다. (sillyehamnida.) - Formal
  9. 진심으로 사과드립니다. (jinsimeuro sagwadeurimnida.) - Formal
  10. 용서해주세요. (yongseohaejuseyo.) - Formal
  11. 저기요 (jeogiyo) - Informal
  12. How KoreanClass101.com Can Help You

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Korean


1. 죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.) - Formal

죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.) is the most commonly used phrase to say sorry, and if you’ve just started learning how to say sorry in Korean, memorize this phrase at all costs. Why? Because you’ll hear this wherever you go, and you’ll be using it a lot while traveling in South Korea.

죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.) is a more respectful way to apologize than 미안합니다. (mianhamnida.) and 죄송해요. (joesonghaeyo.), which we’ll explain to you in more detail later.

In addition, using the appropriate body gesture is very important when you say this phrase; you need to slightly bow your head when saying sorry. Also, unlike in some of the countries where eye-contact is very important, making direct eye-contact is considered rude in Korea. Therefore, when you want to apologize to someone, try not to make eye-contact; instead, look slightly downward, toward the floor.

Situation 1:

Someone comes along and pushes you while you’re holding a cup of coffee, which results in spilling the coffee on someone else.

  • You: 어머, 괜찮으세요? 너무 *죄송합니다. [bow]
    You: eomeo, gwaenchaneuseyo? neomu joesonghamnida.
    You: “Oh no, are you okay? I am so sorry.”

*죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.) is a good way to apologize to someone. However, when you want to more sincerely apologize to someone, add 너무 (neomu), meaning “very,” before 죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.).

  • Customer: 아, 괜찮습니다.
    Customer: a, gwaenchanseumnida.
    Customer: “Ah, it’s okay.”

In this situation, you spilled the coffee by accident and are sincerely apologizing someone. In this case, you need to bow as you apologize.

Situation 2:

You accidently stepped on someone’s foot when entering the bus.

  • You: 죄송합니다. [no need to bow in this situation]
    You: joesonghamnida.
    You: “I am sorry.”
  • Other person: 아니요, 괜찮습니다.
    Other person: aniyo, gwaenchanseumnida.
    Other person: “It’s okay, never mind.”

In this situation, you don’t have enough time to bow and apologize to someone. So this simple version of how to say “I’m sorry” in Korean to the person whose foot you stepped on is good enough.


2. 잘못했습니다. (jalmothaetseumnida.) - Formal

3 Ways to Say Sorry

잘못했습니다. (jalmothaetseumnida.) is translated as “It is my fault,” in Korean, and it’s a formal way to say sorry. It’s used when you know that something you did was completely wrong, and want to ask for their forgiveness. You can add 죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.) to sound more apologetic.

The classical example of how to use this phrase is when a child asks for his mother’s forgiveness. When a child apologizes, he/she usually rubs their hands together as they apologize. The informal way to say 잘못했습니다. (jalmothaetseumnida.) is 잘못했어 (jalmothaesseo).

Situation 1:

You wronged your friend before, and need to apologize to them.

  • You: 네 말이 맞았어, 다 내 잘못이야. 잘못했어.*
    You: ne mari majasseo, da nae jalmosiya. jalmothaesseo.
    You: “You were right, it’s all my fault. Please forgive me.”
  • Your friend: 휴… 됐다.
    Your friend: hyu… dwaetda.
    Your friend: “Sigh..whatever.”

* Be careful with spacing the phrase. Many Korean learners make mistakes here. For example, 잘못했습니다. (jalmothaetseumnida.), meaning “It is my fault, I am sorry,” and 잘 못했습니다. (jal mothaetseumnida) meaning “I did not do well,” have two completely different meanings.

Woman With Palms Facing Outward


3. 미안해요. (mianhaeyo.) - Formal

Each apology expression has a different level of politeness, and 미안해요. (mianhaeyo.) is the least formal way to say “I am sorry.” It’s not often used, but you will hear this expression a lot in Korean dramas. Just note that 미안해요. (mianhaeyo.) is another option for apologizing.

It sounds a lot more natural to say 죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.) or 죄송해요. (joesonghaeyo.) instead of 미안해요. (mianhaeyo.) in practice. Also, 미안합니다 (mianhamnida) sounds more polite, but in most situations, you should just stick to 죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.).

Situation 1:

You’ve received many missed calls from someone who’s a couple of years younger than you, and you want to apologize for not answering their calls.

  • You: 전화했었어요?. 못 받아서 미안해요.
    You: jeonhwahaesseosseoyo?. mot badaseo mianhaeyo.
    You: “Did you call? I am sorry for missing your calls.”
  • Other person: 괜찮습니다. 전화 주셔서 감사합니다.
    Other person: gwaenchanseumnida. jeonhwa jusyeoseo gamsahamnida.
    Other person: “It’s okay. Thank you for returning the call.”

Situation 2:

A colleague was calling, but you couldn’t pick up the phone because you were driving. You’re returning the call and want to apologize.

  • You: 미안해요, 운전하고 있었어요.
    You: mianhaeyo, unjeonhagoisseosseoyo.
    You: “I am sorry, I was driving.”
  • Your colleague: 아 그러셨군요. 괜찮습니다.
    Your colleague: a geureosyeotgunyo. gwaenchanseumnida.
    Your colleague: “I see. It’s okay.”


4. 죄송해요. (joesonghaeyo.) - Formal.

죄송해요. (joesonghaeyo.) has the same meaning as 죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.), but sounds less formal. You can’t say this phrase to your professor or someone who’s much older than you. If you want to be on the safe side, stick to 죄송합니다. (joesonghamnida.).

Situation 1:

You’ve already asked a few questions to your colleague about something, but you still want to ask more questions.

  • You: 바쁘신데 계속 방해해서 죄송해요.
    You: bappeusinde gyesok banghaehaeseo joesonghaeyo.
    You: “I am sorry to keep bothering you.”
  • Your colleague: 아닙니다. 괜찮습니다.
    Your colleague: animnida. gwaenchanseumnida.
    Your colleague: “No, it’s okay.”

Situation 2:

You interrupted someone and the person seems annoyed by it.

  • You: 죄송해요 방해할 생각은 아니였어요.
    You: joesonghaeyo banghae hal saenggageun aniyeosseoyo.
    You: “Sorry, I didn’t mean to interrupt.”
  • The other person: 괜찮습니다.
    The other person: gwaenchanseumnida.
    The other person: “It’s okay.”


5. 미안해 (mianhae) - Informal

미안해 (mianhae) is an informal way to say 잘못했습니다. (jalmothaetseumnida.). 미안해 (mianhae) and 미안 (mian) are used interchangeably, but keep in mind that 미안해 (mianhae) sounds more polite and gives the impression that the speaker cares about the listener’s feelings. On the other hand, 미안 (mian) sounds more like how a child would apologize.

Situation 1:

You want to apologize to your friend.

  • You: * 정말 미안해, 용서해주라. 응?
    You: jeongmal mianhae, yongseohaejura. eung?
    You: “I’m really sorry, can you forgive me. Ey?”
  • Your friend: 알았어. 이번 한번만 용서해줄께.
    Your friend: arasseo. ibeon hanbeonman yongseohaejulkke.
    Your friend: “Alright. I will forgive you this time.”

* 정말 (jeongmal) means “really.” Add this word if you want to sincerely apologize to your friend.

Situation 2:

You’re supposed to meet your friend at three o’clock, but you arrived half an hour late.

  • You: 많이 늦었지? 정말 미안해!
    You: mani neujeotji? jeongmal mianhae!
    You: “I’m so sorry for arriving late!”
  • Your friend: 괜찮아. 나도 방금 도착했어.
    Your friend: gwaenchana. nado banggeum dochakaesseo.
    Your friend: “It’s fine. I’ve just arrived too.”

Little Boy Who Needs to Use Restroom


6. 미안 (mian) - Informal

미안 (mian) is a casual way to apologize to your friends, and the direct translation is “sorry.” In addition, 미안 (mian) can also mean “no” in some situations. For example, when you’re invited to a party organized by your friend and want to politely decline, you can simply say 미안 (mian).

Situation 1:

You’re thirty minutes late and want to apologize to your friend, and need to know how to say “Sorry I’m late,” in Korean.

  • You: 늦어서 미안! (=먄!*)
    You: neujeoseo mian!
    You: “Sorry I’m late!”
  • Your friend: 괜찮아.
    Your friend: gwaenchana.
    Your friend: “It’s okay.”

* 먄 (myan) is a shorter word to say sorry, and it’s a Korean slang. This Korean slang is used frequently in written context among young people. A more polite Korean slang to say sorry is 죄송 (joeson), which is another casual way for people of the same age to apologize to each other.

Situation 2:

You’re invited to a party that you don’t want to go to.

  • Your friend: 이번주 토요일에 이태원에서 하는 파티 갈래?
    Your friend: ibeonju toyoire itaewoneseo haneun pati gallae?
    Your friend: “Do you want to go to a party in Itaewon this Saturday?”
  • You: 음… 미안. 별로 가고 싶지 않네.
    You: eum… mian. byeollo gago sipji anne.
    You: “Hmm… sorry. I don’t feel like going.”
  • Your friend: 알았어.
    Your friend: arasseo.
    Your friend: “Alright.”


7. 잠시만요. (jamsimanyo.) - Informal/Formal

Saying Sorry

The direct translation of 잠시만요. (jamsimanyo.) is “please hold on.” It also translates as “Excuse me,” in Korean depending on the situation, and is roughly how to say “Excuse me, sorry” in Korean. 실례합니다. (sillyehamnida.), which we’ll discuss below, and 잠시만요 (jamsimanyo.) are interchangeable; by just remembering one of these two phrases, you’ll be able to survive in Korea.

To distinguish between these two phrases, 실례합니다. (sillyehamnida.) sounds slightly more formal, and it’s often used by professionals. Therefore, when you say this phrase, people around you will instantly think that you’re a professional white-collar worker.

잠시만요 (jamsimanyo.), on the other hand, is often used by people of different age groups, and it sounds casual and friendly. Also, 잠시만요 (jamsimanyo.) is used a lot more than 실례합니다. (sillyehamnida.).

Situation 1:

You want to pass through the crowd at the bus stop.

  • You: 잠시만요.*
    You: jamsimanyo.
    You: “Excuse me.”

* When someone says 잠시만요. (jamsimanyo.), usually you don’t need to respond with anything. If you do want to respond, you can say 네 (ne) or 알겠습니다. (algetseumnida.). An alternative response is to slightly nod to the person without saying a word.

Situation 2:

Your colleague came to ask where some important documents are.

  • You: 아, 그 서류요. 어디에 있는지 알아요. 잠시만요.
    You: a, geu seoryuyo. eodie inneunji arayo. jamsimanyo.
    You: “Oh, I know where the documents are. Please hold on.”


8. 실례합니다. (sillyehamnida.) - Formal

The direct translation of 실례합니다. (sillyehamnida.) is “Excuse me” in Korean. It can also be translated as “I am sorry for interrupting.” You can use this phrase in many situations, such as when you want to interrupt someone.

You can also say 실례합니다. (sillyehamnida.) when you want to go through a narrow area, such as a corridor between two bookshelves at a bookstore, and want to ask someone to move a bit for you.

Situation 1:

You’re riding on a rush hour train in Korea. Your stop has been reached and you need to pass through the crowd to get off the train.

  • You: 실례합니다. (지나가겠습니다.)*
    You: sillyehamnida. (jinagagetseumnida.)
    You: “Excuse me. (I would like to go through.)”

* It’s not necessary to say 지나가겠습니다. (jinagagetseumnida.); usually 실례합니다. (sillyehamnida.) is adequate enough to discern your message. If you want to be more expressive, just add 지나가겠습니다. (jinagagetseumnida.), and you’re guaranteed to have enough space to go through the crowd.

Situation 2:

You received an urgent phone call from a client and you must pass the message to the manager, who’s chatting with someone.

  • You: 실례합니다. 급한 전화가 와서 그러는데요…
    You: sillyehamnida. geupan jeonhwaga waseo geureoneundeyo…
    You: “I am sorry for interrupting. There is an urgent phone call….”

Woman Bowing in Respect


9. 진심으로 사과드립니다. (jinsimeuro sagwadeurimnida.) - Formal

The direct translation of 진심으로 사과드립니다. (jinsimeuro sagwadeurimnida.) is “I would like to sincerely apologize,” which is a business Korean phrase. Therefore, if you’re planning to work in South Korea, this phrase will come in handy. You’ll see this expression a lot in written context, such as in an email, and a person who says this phrase will bow, usually ninety degrees, to show great respect to the person they’re speaking to.

Situation 1:

You work in a customer service department and received a complaint email.

  • You: 폐를 끼친 데 대해 진심으로 사과드립니다.
    You: pyereul kkichin de daehae jinsimeuro sagwadeurimnida.
    You: “Please accept our apology for any inconvenience caused.”
  • The customer: 죄송하지만 바로 환불 부탁드립니다.
    The customer: joesonghajiman baro hwanbul butakdeurimnida.
    The customer: “I apologize, I would like to return the product.”

Situation 2:

There was a technical issue with the company website, and you want to apologize to its users.

  • You: 불편을 끼쳐드려 대단히 죄송합니다.
    You: bulpyeoneul kkichyeodeuryeo daedanhi joesonghamnida.
    You: “We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience we may have caused.”
  • The customer: 괜찮습니다. 해당 부분에 대해 보고해 주셔서 감사합니다.
    The customer: gwaenchanseumnida. haedang bubune daehae bogohae jusyeoseo gamsahamnida.
    The customer: “It is okay. Thank you for reporting the issue to us.”


10. 용서해주세요. (yongseohaejuseyo.) - Formal

용서해주세요. (yongseohaejuseyo.) has the same meaning as 잘못했습니다. (jalmothaetseumnida.). To understand the differences between these expressions, 잘못했습니다. (jalmothaetseumnida.) is used to apologize, while indirectly requesting someone’s forgiveness (and acknowledge that you made a mistake). 용서해주세요. (yongseohaejuseyo.), on the other hand, is directly asking for forgiveness.

잘못 (jalmot) means “mistake,” and 했습니다 means “I did ~,” so together it means: “I did make a mistake (morally).” 용서 (yongseo) means “forgiveness,” and 해주세요 means “Please do ~,” so together, it means “Please forgive me.”

To some extent, this is similar to the English “I’m really sorry,” in Korean, but is more sincere.

Situation 1:

You broke a promise you made with your parents and you want to ask for forgiveness.

  • You: 제가 잘못했어요. 한번만 용서해주세요.*
    You: jega jalmothaesseoyo. hanbeonman yongseohaejuseyo.
    You: “I made a mistake. Please forgive me.”
  • Parents: 알겠다. 이번 한번만 용서해주마.
    Parents: algetda. ibeon hanbeonman yongseohaejuma.
    Parents: “Understood. We will forgive you this time.”

* You can combine the two apology phrases, as follows: 잘못했습니다. 용서해주세요. (jalmothaetseumnida. yongseohaejuseyo.), in order to admit your mistake and ask directly for forgiveness.

Situation 2:

You got caught by the police for speeding.

  • You: 잘못했습니다. 용서해주세요.
    You: jalmothaetseumnida. yongseohaejuseyo.
    You: “I made a mistake. Please forgive me.”
  • Police officer: 면허증 주십시오.
    Police officer: myeonheojeung jusipsio.
    Police officer: “Please present your driver’s license.”


11. 저기요 (jeogiyo) - Informal

We’ve introduced a number of ways to say “excuse me” in Korean, and you’ve learned that 실례합니다. (sillyehamnida.), 죄송합니다 (joesonghamnida) have the same meaning. Although the translation of 저기요 (jeogiyo) is “excuse me,” you need to be careful to use this phrase in the proper context. 저기요 (jeogiyo) has two meanings:

Firstly, this phrase is used to draw attention from someone, usually in order to directly make a complaint to the person. Therefore, it’s not used to excuse yourself to do something (e.g. passing through the crowd). In general, it also gives a negative feeling to the listener, so unless you want to complain to someone, just stick to the formal phrases.

Secondly, this phrase is used to call someone, especially at a restaurant. Note that you can’t say this phrase at a luxurious restaurant, as 저기요 (jeogiyo) is a very informal way to draw attention to yourself.

When you want to call someone, especially a staff member at a restaurant, the best way to call them is to make eye contact with them and raise your hand. You don’t necessarily need to say 저기요 (jeogiyo) if the staff acknowledges you, but adding 저기요 (jeogiyo) will definitely draw attention from all the staff at a restaurant.

Situation 1:

Someone stepped on your foot without saying sorry.

  • You: 저기요, 발을 밟았으면 사과해야 하는 거 아닌가요?
    You: jeogiyo, bareul balbasseumyeon sagwahaeya haneun geo aningayo?
    You: “Excuse me, if you stepped on my foot, aren’t you supposed to apologize to me?”
  • Stranger: 아, 몰랐습니다. 죄송합니다.
    Stranger: a, mollatseumnida. joesonghamnida.
    Stranger: “Oh, I did not know. I am sorry.”

Situation 2:

You’re at a Korean restaurant and are about to order Ddeukbokki. You make eye contact with a waiter and say:

  • You: 저기요~
    You: jeogiyo~
    You: “Excuse me!”
  • A waiter: 네~ 잠시만요.
    A waiter: ne~ jamsimanyo.
    A waiter: “Yes! One sec.”

Someone Holding Miniature Korean Flag


How KoreanClass101.com Can Help You

In summary, we introduced eleven ways to say “I am sorry” in Korean and provided appropriate scenarios to use each expression. Learning how to say sorry in Korean phrases doesn’t have to be hard. On KoreanClass101, we have a vocabulary list of common ways to say sorry in Korean, which introduces sixteen different ways to apologize, apart from what we introduced in this blog, so feel free to check this page out too.

We also have many other free vocabulary lists, such as “Phrases to Use When You Are Angry” and “Negative Emotions,” both of which will certainly help you understand more about how people express themselves when they’re angry (even after an apology!). Feel free to check out KoreanClass101.com and begin studying Korean for free. Know that with enough practice and dedication, you can become a master of Korean!

Before you go, drop us a comment about what new things you learned today about Korean apologies. Do you feel more confident about apologizing in Korean, or are there some things you’re still struggling with? Let us know in the comments!

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Chuseok: How to Celebrate Korean Thanksgiving Day

Chuseok

Today, we will discuss one of the most important Korean holidays in Korea–Chuseok, or the Korean version of Thanksgiving. We will be offering detailed information about what you are expected to do during the holidays, as well as the activities that take place during the holidays.

  1. Chuseok Holiday: What is Chuseok and When Is It?
  2. Korean Traditional Holiday: History of Chuseok
  3. Chuseok Activities: Are There Any Korean Traditional Games?
  4. Traditional Chuseok Foods: What do you eat on Chuseok?
  5. Chuseok Greetings: Phrases You Need to Know
  6. Activities for Foreigners During Chuseok
  7. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You

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1. Chuseok Holiday: What is Chuseok and When Is It?

1- What is Chuseok and What Do You Do on Chuseok?

추석 [Chuseok], also known as the Korean Thanksgiving holidays, is one of the most important cultural holidays in Korea, along with 설날 [Seollal; New Year’s Day], in South Korea. It is celebrated on the 15th day(full moon) of the 8th month in the lunar calendar.

Traditionally, Koreans used to wear traditional clothes called 한복 [Hanbok] when visiting their parents and extended family during the holidays. Women usually prepared the table filled with food for the family’s ancestors. It may sound fun since everyone visits their home to meet their family, but preparing the food is still not an easy task for Korean women as there are many different dishes to prepare, such as rice, soup, rice cakes, fruits, and various other dishes, traditional drinks, and desserts.

After the meal preparation and ancestral worship, the family will gather to have big meals together. Some Korean families will visit their ancestor’s graveyards located in the deep mountains, while others engage in family activities together. We’ll provide more details below.

2- So When is Chuseok?

Calendar

Chuseok fell on the 13th of September in 2019, but the holiday period actually lasts for three or more. The date of Chuseok is different every year as it is based on the lunar calendar, so it’s mandatory to check the exact date and plan the traveling in advance. This is because most Koreans will return to their hometowns, resulting in a lack of train and airplane tickets and major traffic jams.

Here are the dates of Chuseok for the next 10 years:

  • 2019: 9월 13일 [guwol sipsamil] - September 13, 2019
  • 2020: 10월 1일 [siwol iril] - October 1, 2020
  • 2021: 9월 21일 [guwol isibiril] - September 21, 2021
  • 2022: 9월 10일 [guwol sibil] - September 10, 2022
  • 2023: 9월 29일 [guwol isipguil] - September 29, 2023
  • 2024: 9월 17일 [guwol sipchiril] - September 17, 2024
  • 2025: 10월 6일 [siwol yugil] - October 6, 2025
  • 2026: 9월 25일 [guwol isiboil] - September 25, 2026
  • 2027: 9월 15일 [guwol iboil] - September 15, 2027
  • 2028: 10월 3일 [siwol samil] - October 3, 2028


2. Korean Traditional Holiday: History of Chuseok

The origin of the Chuseok holidays isn’t clear. From what little that we know, Chuseok originates back to nearly 2,000 years ago, when the third king of the Silla dynasty, King Yuri (24-57) supposedly started the chuseok holidays as a competitive festival. Legend states that the women in the kingdom were put into different groups for a certain amount of time. During this time, each team weaved as much cloth as they could, and the winning team was treated to a feast of food.


3. Chuseok Activities: Are There Any Korean Traditional Games?

There are many activities that you can enjoy during Chuseok.

1- 강강술래 [Ganggangsullae] - 5,000-year-old Korean Traditional Dance

강강술래 [Ganggangsullae] is a Korean traditional dance that is performed by women only at night.

The women stand in circle and hold each other’s hand as they move around in a clockwise direction. There is no music accompanying the dance; one woman sings, while the other women repeat 강강술래 [ganggangsullae] over and over. The songs performed during the dance tell stories about everyday life in Korea.

2- 윷놀이 [Yunnori] - Traditional Board Game Played in Korea

윷놀이 [Yunnori] is a traditional Korean board game. Usually, the game is played by two teams or more. It is similar to a board game where you throw one or two dices to move forward. Instead of a dice, there are 윷[yut] sticks, which are 4 sticks. Also, when you throw these Yut sticks, each combination has its name. For example:

  • 도 [do]: One stick over and three sticks up; take a step forward
  • 개 [gae]: Two sticks up and two sticks over; take two steps forward
  • 걸 [geol]: One stick up and three sticks over; take three steps forward
  • 윷 [yut]: All sticks over; take 4 steps forward
  • 모 [mo]: All sticks up; take 5 steps forward

If you are not sure how the combination works, check out this image.

Also, when sticks result in either 윷 [yut] or 모 [mo], the play gets another chance of throwing the sticks.

3- 씨름 [ssireum]- Traditional Korean Wrestling

Korea

씨름 [ssireum] also known as Korean wrestling is a traditional national sport of Korea since the fourth century. Ssireum was originated back in the Goguryeo period.

In the 20th century, 씨름[ssireum] gained popularity and quickly became a nationally televised sport in South Korea. People would gather around to watch the 씨름[ssireum] championships. However, in recent days, 씨름[ssireum] has lost its popularity and is rarely shown on TV.

4- 줄다리기 [juldarigi] - Korean Traditional Tug of War

줄다리기 [juldarigi] is the Korean version of tug of war.

The concept is similar to the Western version. Participants use a huge rice-straw rope which is pulled at by two teams. The number of rice-straw ropes and the rules may vary depending on the region.

5- 거북놀이 [geobungnori] - Turtle Play

거북놀이 [geobungnori], direct translation being ‘Turtle Play’, is a play which is performed to drive away negative spirits and ghosts, and wish for good health and long life.

It is usually performed in the 경기도 [Gyeonggi Province] and 충청도 [Chungcheong Province] regions during the Chuseok holidays.


4. Traditional Chuseok Foods: What do you eat on Chuseok?

1- Exchanging Gifts: Huge Variety of Chuseok Gifts

Gift-giving is a new tradition. Koreans show their appreciation for the people in their lives by giving others gifts for Chuseok–this can be to family, friends, coworkers, and bosses.

At a supermarket, you will be able to see a variety of Chuseok gift sets, such as Spam, high-quality cuts of beef, baskets of beautifully wrapped fresh fruits, and so on. Between business acquaintances, Koreans usually exchange sets of Korean traditional sweets or wines.

One thing to note is 김영란법 [Kim Young-ran Act; The Improper Solicitation and Graft Act], so there is a limit to how much money you can spend on gifts. This law does not apply to friends or family members but does for business acquaintances, so please watch out for it if you are planning to exchange Chuseok gifts.

2- List of Traditional Korean Chuseok Food that You Can Eat

On Chuseok, there is some food that you can only eat during the holidays–it is similar to Seollal, when Koreans eat 떡국 [tteokguk; rice cake soup] to celebrate the New Year. During Chuseok, Songpyeon, a type of sweet rice cake, is the signature food. It is relatively easy to make and delicious. Now let’s see a list of Chuseok foods:

1. 송편 [Songpyeon] - Korean Rice Cakes with Honey

송편 [songpyeon] is a signature Chuseok food which is made of glutinous rice. Songpyeon is half-moon shaped rice cakes that contain sweet ingredients such as honey, chestnut paste or red bean paste inside. Half-moon shaped Songpyeon is the original, but these days, there are various different shapes of Songpyeons available.

2. 전 [Jeon] - Traditional Korean-style Pancake

전 [jeon] is a traditional Korean-style pancake. You can eat it as a main dish, side dish, or even as an appetizer or snack. The ingredients you put inside is completely up to you. You can add scallions, kimchi or various vegetables and seafood.

3. 잡채 [Japchae] - Stir-fried glass noodles with various vegetables

잡채 [japchae] is savory stir-fried glass noodles with meat and various vegetables such as carrots, mushrooms, and onions, seasoned with soy sauce and sesame oil. Japchae is a traditional Korean food that is served on special occasions such as weddings, birthdays and holidays.

4. 제사상 음식 [Jesasang eumsik] - Variety of Foods for Ancestral Rites Table

The main activity of Chuseok is 제사 [jesa], which is a ceremony practiced in South Korea. Women prepare meals for ancestors and you will be able to eat all the dishes after the worship. Variety of dishes are placed on a table. For example: fruits and vegetables such as [gam; persimmon], [bae; Asian pear], 사과 [sagwa; apple], 배추 [baechu; Napa cabbage], [bam; chestnut], 곶감 [gotgam; Dried Persimmon] and other dishes such as 생선 [saengseon; fish], 나물 [namul; seasoned vegetables], [jeon; Korean traditional pancake], 한과 [Hangwa; Korean traditional sweets] and many more. Note that the preparation of dishes vary slightly depending on a family, as some families add 바나나 [banana] or other foods that are not normally being served during Chuseok, but simply survived because one of the ancestors loved them. To give you an idea of how dishes are places, here are some pictures.


5. Chuseok Greetings: Phrases You Need to Know

Knowing how to say ‘Happy Chuseok’ in Korea is important since people exchange many Chuseok greetings to each other in Korea.

1- 즐거운 한가위 보내세요.

  • Jeulgeoun hangawi bonaeseyo.
  • I hope you have a Happy Thanksgiving.

즐거운[jeulgeoun] - pleasant
한가위 [hangawi] - Korean Thanksgiving Day, aka 추석 [Chuseok]

2- 좋은일만 가득하세요.

  • Joeunilman gadeukaseyo.
  • I wish you all the best.

좋은일 [joeunil] - good things
가득하다 [gadeukada] - full

3- 즐겁고 행복한 추석 보내시길 바랍니다.

  • Jeulgeopgo haengbokan chuseok bonaesigil baramnida.
  • We wish you a wonderful and happy Chuseok.

행복한 [haengbokan] - happy
추석 [Chuseok] - Korean Thanksgiving
바랍니다 [baramnida] - wish

4- 추석 때 어디 갔어요?

  • Chuseok ttae eodi gasseoyo?
  • Where did you go during Chuseok?

~때 [~ttae] - the moment
어디 갔어요? [eodi gasseoyo?] - where did you go?

5- 추석 때 무엇을 했나요?

  • Chuseok ttae mueoseul haennayo?
  • What did you do on Chuseok?

~때 [~ttae] - the moment
무엇을 했나요? [mueoseul haennayo?] - what did you do?

6- ~에 갔었습니다.

  • ~e gasseotseumnida.
  • I went to ~

Example:
추석 때 서울에 갔었습니다.
Chuseok ttae seoure gasseotseumnida.
I went to Seoul during Chuseok.


6. Activities for Foreigners During Chuseok

For travelers or foreigners living in Korea, Chuseok can be lonely since everyone including friends will be away to celebrate Chuseok. The good news is there are many events only for foreigners during this time–for example, 캐리비안베이 [Caribbean Bay] at Everland offers special discounts for foreigners, so that they can enjoy the indoor and outdoor water park.

To receive a discount, visit their website and download a special discount coupon during the Chuseok event. Caribbean Bay is one of the most crowded amusement parks in Korea, but if you have a privilege to enjoy a spacious place with fewer people.

Also, many other touristic areas offer special events during Chuseok, so be sure to check out their events to enjoy them too.


7. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You

You may want to check out our free lessons such as Korean Thanksgiving Day, a culture class about Chuseok and 7 must-know vocabularies for Chuseok and many more. We also have more Chuseok related Korean articles such as here and top 10 Korean Special event :Chuseok .
Feel free to visit KoreanClass101 for free vocabulary lists, pronunciation practices and also a forum where you can ask any questions about Korea including grammar, pronunciation, cultures and so on.

We hope you found this blog informative and good luck with studying Korean!

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How to Find a Job in South Korea

Working abroad is a great way to explore and immerse yourself in the local culture. Many Korean learners want to work in South Korea, and the number of foreigners who are employed by a Korean company is increasing every year. There are a few things that foreigners finding jobs in Korea need to know, so we’ve put together this guide for you.

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Table of Contents

  1. Benefits of Working in Korea
  2. The Most Popular Jobs in Korea
  3. Visa Requirements to Work in Korea
  4. Do I Need to Speak Korean to Work in South Korea?
  5. Popular Korean Job Hunting Sites
  6. Quick Tips for Korean CV and Resume
  7. Most Common Job Interview Questions in Korea
  8. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Finding a Job in Korea


1. Benefits of Working in Korea

So what’s the benefit of working in Korea? Many people wonder how much their income would be, but it totally depends on your work experience and the company you work for. So it’s important to consult with a recruiter if you want to know the average income you can expect in a specific position or an industry you wish to work in.

1- Overseas Work Experience

Working abroad gives you many benefits in your career development, as many companies appreciate candidates with abroad work experience. Korea has its unique working system and environment, and therefore by working and living in Korea, you’ll definitely enjoy your stay.

2- Korean Leisure Culture

There’s a lot to do for fun in South Korea and you can enjoy many leisures at a low cost. To give you a better idea of what to expect when working and living in Korea, we’ve explained in detail about how much it costs to live in Korea (focusing on Seoul). Feel free to read it.

3- Low Crime Rate

Korea possesses one of the lowest crime rates in the world. CCTVs are installed on every corner of every street and inside buildings. You’ll see a police car driving around the streets at night, and there’s even a free service, for women, where two volunteer workers walk home with you at night.


2. The Most Popular Jobs in Korea

We know it can be stressful searching for foreigners-friendly jobs in Korea, so we thought we’d put together a quick list of the most popular ones. One of the most common jobs that foreigners do in South Korea is teaching a language, especially English, due to high demand. Moreover, you can also find an office job in Korea. If you’re planning to stay in Korea for a year and want to find a part-time job in Korea, this is also a viable option. Below is a quick overview of the most famous jobs that foreigners do in South Korea:

Students Raising Hands

1- Language Teaching Jobs

If you’re a native English speaker who wants to have a career in teaching, finding a job will be a lot easier for you in Korea. There are many advantages of being a language teacher. Firstly, the majority of companies will provide free accomodation and take care of the visa process, meaning you don’t need to worry too much about the initial hiring process period. Some companies even provide free lunch as well. The pay for language teaching jobs in Korea is very decent, usually ranging between 2,000,000 KRW ~ 3,000,000 KRW, depending on your professional experience.

However, depending on which school you work for, you need to understand that working hours may not be flexible. For example, you may be expected to only teach grammar for the whole day, or be required to do extra activities like field trips or orchestral activities with the Korean students. So do check what your responsibilities are going to look like before applying for a job.

Researcher

2- Office Jobs

If you work at an office, you’ll have international experience. There are many international companies in South Korea that are aggressively hiring foreigners or 교포 (gyopos) also known as “Korean diaspora.” So if you’re qualified for a position, you’ll definitely be considered as a potential candidate. Moreover, if you work at a global company, many Korean employees are bilingual or multilingual, making it much easier for you to work on projects with them.

However, to find employment in Korea, it’s important to note that the majority of office jobs require fluency in Korean if your first language is not Korean. Therefore, you may struggle to find a job in Korea if you cannot speak Korean. You have to have a way to prove that you can speak the language, such as a TOPIK score or a Korean language school certificate.

If you’re an intermediate to advanced Korean speaker, or majored in Korean at a university in your country, you’ll be able to find many jobs available for you in Korea, such as translation jobs (Korean-to-English translation jobs are in demand) or language-related positions at a startup company or even global companies since these companies aggressively seek out bilingual candidates.

In contrast to language teaching jobs, many companies won’t provide free accomodation.

3- Blue-Collar Jobs

Jobs in the blue-collar industry such as automotive, chemical, electronic, and steel are of high employment need in Korea. Also, jobs like cleaning or farming are also highly in demand.

As these jobs usually don’t require Korean language skills or other specialized skills, they are perhaps the easiest way for foreigners to get a job. Many companies are foreigners-friendly and depending on the company you work for, accommodations may be provided. Finding a foreigners-friendly blue-collar job is similar to finding other work in Korea, so try to search blue-collar jobs with these keywords:

  • 공장 (gongjang) or “factory”
  • 화장품 공장 (hwajangpum gongjang) or “cosmetics factory”
  • 제품 생산직 (jepum saengsanjik) or “product production”
  • 단순포장 (dansunpojang) or “simple packing”
  • 야간 청소 (yagan cheongso) or “night shift cleaning”
  • 농장일 (nongjangil) or “working at a farm”

4- Health-, Science-, and Technology-related Jobs

Recently, more and more doctors from overseas are working in South Korean hospitals. Also, if you’re an engineer, many international companies, especially in the IT industry, hire foreign candidates in South Korea.

Going to Work


3. Visa Requirements to Work in Korea

We’re sure you know already that there are visa requirements for foreigners to work in Korea. There are many visas that you can choose from, and therefore it’s important for you to research each visa. Depending on the employment position in South Korea, you’ll need to acquire an appropriate visa in order to continue working and living in South Korea:

1- E2 Visa (The Standard English Teaching)

Career choice with E2 visa holders: Private schools, public schools, and language institutions.

2- E1 Visa (Similar to the E2 Visa)

Career choice with E1 visa holders: Any recognized Korean colleges and universities .

3- E5 Visa (Professional Employee)

Career choice with E5 visa holders: Corporations.

4- F3 Visa (Direct Family Member)

Career choice for F3 visa holders: Since this is an extended tourist visa, you’re not allowed to work in South Korea.

5- F4 Visa (For Korean Americans, Korean Canadians, etc.)

Career choice for F4 visa holders: You have the same rights as Korean citizens, therefore you can work in any business or organization in South Korea.

6- E7 Visa (12-month Working Holiday Visa)

Career choice for E7 visa holders: Depends. If you can speak Korean, you can work at a restaurant, shopping stores, and so on. If you cannot speak Korean, it may be difficult for you to work in a service industry.

The eligibility of each visa varies depending on your objective in working in South Korea. For this reason, if you’re uncertain which visa to obtain, consult with the South Korean embassy, or consulate in your home country or with your new employer. Also, make sure to apply two to three months early for a smooth visa process. Then, you’ll have fewer worries regarding finding a job in Korea.

Seoul


4. Do I Need to Speak Korean to Work in South Korea?

Korean language skill requirements completely depend on the company you’re applying for. However, if you can prove your language skills, you’ll definitely have an advantage above others applying for the same job. As for Korean skills, you’ll be asked to present a TOPIK test result (Test of Proficiency in Korean—website) or a certificate from 어학당 (eohakdang) which is a Korean language school that you went to.

For language teaching positions, you may need to be able to speak some Korean in order to communicate with students who otherwise would struggle to understand you. In addition, you’ll have a closer relationship with your students if you can speak Korean.

As for corporations, you do need to present proof that you can speak Korean. They don’t expect you to speak Korean fluently, but they’ll definitely appreciate and consider you more as a potential employee, since having a certificate or a TOPIK result demonstrates how ambitious you are to work in South Korea.

If you’re interested in finding the right Korean language institution for you, here’s a list for you to look at.

Website


5. Popular Korean Job Hunting Sites

There are many websites that you can use to find a job in South Korea. In general, these are the most popular Korean job searching websites for finding a job in Korea.

1- General Job (Available in English)

  • PeoplenJob — only international corporations in Korea
  • Indeed — for any corporation positions
  • Linkedin — for any corporation positions
  • Robert Walters — for any corporation positions
  • Craigslist — mainly English teaching jobs or waiter and waitress positions

2- General Job (Available only in Korean)

  • JobKorea — small to large corporations in Korea
  • Saramin — small to large corporations in Korea
  • Incruit — small to large corporations in Korea
  • Designerjob — for graphic designers
  • Mediajob — for video editors, writers, and so on

3- Part-time Job Search

  • 알바천국 — only available in Korean
  • 알바몬 — only available in Korean
  • Craigslist — mainly English teaching jobs or waiter and waitress positions
  • Apply Offline — this is explained below in “Others”

4- Community

5- Others

  • Volunteering in Korea
    • Language Exchange: Whether you want to make friends or gain teaching experience, if you speak English or any other popular languages (e.g. French, Japanese, Chinese, and so on), you can volunteer at a language exchange cafe. There are many language exchange events organized in South Korea, especially in Seoul and Busan. Your main duty is to converse with language learners in a casual and comfortable environment. If you search for language exchange events in South Korea, you can easily find many events, but if you’re not familiar with this, start off with Meetup Korea. All you need to do is select the location (e.g. Seoul, Busan, etc.) and go through the list of weekly events in your area.

      Also, depending on the time and the location, you may meet more university students or professional workers. Volunteering is a great way to make friends and consult about your career plans in Korea.

    • Other volunteering work: There are many volunteer groups organized by foreigners in Korea. Several locals and foreigners participate and do many activities together, therefore it’s a great opportunity to make friends while helping others who are in need. Here’s a list of volunteer groups:
  • Job Fair in Korea
    • Korea organizes a job fair annually, targeting foreigners in Korea. All of the companies that come to this job fair are foreigner-friendly, so keep an eye out for it. You can search for keywords like 외국인 취업박람회 (oegugin chwieopbangnamhoe) meaning “Job fair for foreign residents” or 외국인유학생 채용박람회 (oeguginyuhaksaeng chaeyongbangnamhoe) meaning “Job fair for international students” to find the date and the time. There will be many corporations offering job positions and internships for foreigners. Make sure to print your resume and your cover letter before attending the job fair.
  • Check Vacant Positions on a Website
    • You can always directly apply at the company you wish to work for. Many companies have a “career” page that lists all the open positions, so if you have some specific companies in mind, try to visit their websites and submit your application.
  • Apply offline
    • When finding a job in Korea, you can also apply offline if you want to find a part-time job, such as a waitress/waiter or cashier. If you’re looking for a part-time job in Korea, applying directly at the place is the best and quickest way to find a job. To do this, look for 스태프모집 (seutaepeumojip), 일할 사람 구함 (ilhal saram guham), 사람구함 (saramguham), or 직원구함 (jigwonguham) on the entrance of a shop. They usually put the hourly rate and preference, too. You do need to have a resume prepared and in-hand when you apply offline. As for larger corporations, applying offline is very rare. It’s recommended to submit the application directly to the company’s website or through recruiters.

Resume


6. Quick Tips for Korean CV and Resume

In Korea, you need to prepare 이력서 (iryeokseo), which is a Korean version of a resume. [image]. In addition, you’ll also need to write a 자기소개서 (jagisogaeseo) or “cover letter.” You can download a free template online or purchase the resume and cover letter documents at a convenience store. Below are some Korean job application tips that we think you’ll find useful.

1- Korean Resume Tips

Korean Resume Photo

You’ll need to attach a profile picture at the top right corner on the first page. Your profile picture for your resume is one of the most important elements of the resume, so try to get your pictures taken by a professional photographer in Korea. Koreans always wear a black business suit to look professional and your professional picture will most likely be photoshopped. This is because when your resume is handed to a potential employer, the first thing they’ll look at is your picture, and so it’s important to have a nice picture of yourself. The first impression matters in the business world, and this is no different in South Korea.

Education History

You need to arrange all of your education chronologically and you’ll also need to provide the year and the month of your graduation and entrance into schools. So try to write them down and save them somewhere in your drive. You’ll find this list helpful when finding a job in Korea.

2- Writing a Cover Letter in Korea

Koreans call the cover letter a 자기소개서 (jagiseogaeseo) or “self-introduction letter” [image] and Koreans usually write about the following:

  • 성장과정 (seongjanggwajeong) — Talk about your growth process
  • 학창시절 (hakchangsijeol) — Talk about your education
  • 성격소개 (seonggyeoksogae) — Talk about your personality
  • 지원동기 및 포부 (jiwondonggi mit pobu) — Talk about why you applied for this job and what you want to do

You can modify the topics if you want. When you write your self-introduction letter, make sure to emphasize your strengths and how your skills will benefit the company.

3- At the Interview

You need to:

  • Arrive for the interview 10 to 15 minutes early.
  • Print your resume and your cover letter and bring them with you.
  • Prepare the interview answers in Korean and English.
  • Bow to an interviewer and be polite!


7. Most Common Job Interview Questions in Korea

There’s not much difference when it comes to the job interview questions in Korea. Depending on which corporation you want to work for, the interview process may take two weeks to three months. Also, if you wish to apply for large corporations in Korea such as 삼성 (Samsung), 현대 (Hyundai), 엘지 (LG), or 대우 (Daewoo), you’ll take an examination which consists of testing your language ability and mathematical skills. For example, as for Samsung, once your job application (your cover letter and your resume) is submitted through their website, you’ll have a chance to undertake an exam called 삼성직무적성검사 (samseongjingmujeokseonggeomsa) called GSAT, which is an abbreviation for “Global Samsung Aptitude Test.” Normally, the exam is scheduled during the weeknd, and you can even take the exam in English. If you pass this exam, you’ll have the opportunity to go to the next round which involves group and individual interviews.

If you’re not sure what the interview process is going to be like, Koreans usually share their interview experiences online, such as on Specup, so if you’re confident in speaking Korean and want to find a job in Korea, take advantage of online community websites too.

The interview is one of the trickiest and most stressful activities in the hiring process. Since you can’t predict what kind of questions you’ll be asked, it’s important to prepare as many anticipated questions as possible with the appropriate answers.

Let’s have a look at common interview questions in Korea:

  • 자기소개를 해보세요. (jagi sogaereul haeboseyo.) — “Introduce yourself.”
  • 왜 저희가 당신을 고용해야 한다고 생각하십니까 ? (wae jeohuiga dangsineul goyonghaeya handago saenggakasimnikka?) — “Why do you think that we should hire you?”
  • 한국말 할 수 있나요? (hangungmal hal su innayo?) — “Do you speak Korean?”
  • 우리 회사에 대해 어떻게 알고 있나요? (uri hoesae daehae eotteoke algo innayo?) — “How did you find out about our company?”
  • 지금의 직장을 왜 그만두려고 합니까? (jigeumui jikjangeul wae geumanduryeogo hamnikka?) — “Why do you want to quit your current job?”
  • 5년 후의 당신의 모습은 어떨것 같나요? (onyeon huui dangsinui moseubeun eotteolgeot gannayo?) — “Where do you see yourself in five years?”
  • There are many more questions you can expect to hear. However, be careful with the question below in particular:

  • 당신의 강점과 약점은 무엇인가요? (dangsinui gangjeomgwa yakjeomeun mueosingayo?) — “What are your strengths and weaknesses?”
    • This question is often asked in South Korea. They want to know your weaknesses and if you can’t turn your weaknesses into something positive, you’ll end up giving a negative impression to the interviewer, so be careful with this question. It’s vital to give a good answer to this question when looking for employment in Korea.

In addition, they’ll usually go through your resume and ask many questions on the basis of your work experience. So try to come up with as many questions as possible and prepare the answers in Korean and English.


8. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You

The most important point is that there are many ways to find jobs in Korea, but if you speak the language, you’ll be able to find a job that you really like. Being able to speak Korean will definitely give you some advantages.

Also, before jumping into learning Korean, you’ll need to find someone who can support you, like a Korean native speaker and someone who can provide appropriate language study materials. In your case, they have to be related to finding a job in Korea.

MyTeacher at KoreanClass101 can definitely help you with business Korean and give practical advice on finding a job in South Korea. So why not sign up for a lifetime account today, assess your Korean language level, and have your own personalized learning program based on your needs?

We hope today’s lesson gave you some insight on working and living in Korea, and that our job application tips help you succeed and land your dream job. Thanks for reading and best of luck!

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How to Say I Love You in Korean - Romantic Word List

Do you often feel lonely and sad? Do you long for romance and are willing to do whatever it takes to meet that special person? Speaking another language could revolutionize your love life! So, why wait? Learning how to say ‘love’ in Korean could be just what you need to find it.

Or perhaps you were lucky, and have found your Korean partner already. Fantastic! Yet, a cross-cultural relationship comes with unique challenges. Learning how to speak your lover’s language will greatly improve your communication and enhance the relationship. At KoreanClass101, our team will teach you all the words, quotes and phrases you need to woo your Korean lover with excellence! Our tutors provide personal assistance, with plenty of extra material available to make Korean dating easy for you.

Table of Contents

  1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date
  2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date
  3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary
  4. Korean Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day
  5. Korean Quotes about Love
  6. Marriage Proposal Lines
  7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines
  8. Will Falling in Love Help You Learn Korean Faster?

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1. Common Phrases You’ll Need for a Date

So, you have met your Korean love interest. Congratulations! Who knows where this could take you…?! However, the two of you have just met and you’re not ready to say the Korean word for love just yet. Great, it is better to get to know him/her first. Wow your prospective love by using these Korean date phrases to set up a spectacular first date.

Korean Date Phrases

Would you like to go out to dinner with me?

  • 저랑 저녁 먹으러 가실래요?
  • Jeorang jeonyeok meogeureo gasillaeyo?

The important question! In most cultures, this phrase indicates: ‘I’m romantically interested in you’. Flirting in Korean is no different, so don’t take your date to Mcdonald’s!

Are you free this weekend?

  • 이번 주말에 시간 어때요?
  • Ibeon jumare sigan eottaeyo?

This is a preamble to asking your love interest on a date. If you get an immediate ‘Yes’, that’s good news!

Would you like to hang out with me?

  • 저랑 데이트하실래요?
  • Jeorang deiteuhasillaeyo?

You like her/him, but you’re not sure if there’s chemistry. Ask them to hang out first to see if a dinner date is next.

What time shall we meet tomorrow?

  • 내일 몇 시에 만날까요?
  • Naeil myeot sie mannalkkayo?

Set a time, and be sure to arrive early! Nothing spoils a potential relationship more than a tardy date.

Where shall we meet?

  • 어디서 만날까요?
  • Eodiseo mannalkkayo?

You can ask this, but also suggest a place.

You look great.

  • 멋져요. (to men) 예뻐요. (to women)
  • Meotjjeoyo. Yeppeoyo.

A wonderful ice breaker! This phrase will help them relax a bit - they probably took great care to look their best just for you.

You are so cute.

  • 정말 귀여워요.
  • Jeongmal gwiyeowoyo.

If the two of you are getting on really well, this is a fun, flirtatious phrase to use.

What do you think of this place?

  • 여기 어때요?
  • Yeogi eottaeyo?

This another good conversation starter. Show off your Korean language skills!

Can I see you again?

  • 또 볼 수 있을까요?
  • Tto bol su isseulkkayo?

So the date went really well - don’t waste time! Make sure you will see each other again.

Shall we go somewhere else?

  • 어디 다른 데 갈까요?
  • Eodi dareun de galkkayo?

If the place you meet at is not great, you can suggest going elsewhere. It is also a good question to follow the previous one. Variety is the spice of life!

I know a good place.

  • 좋은 데 알아요.
  • Joeun de arayo.

Use this with the previous question. However, don’t say if you don’t know a good place!

I will drive you home.

  • 집까지 태워다 줄게요.
  • Jibkkaji taewoda julgeyo.

If your date doesn’t have transport, this is a polite, considerate offer. However, don’t be offended if she/he turns you down on the first date. Especially a woman might not feel comfortable letting you drive her home when the two of you are still basically strangers.

That was a great evening.

  • 오늘 저녁 즐거웠어요.
  • Oneul jeonyeok jeulgeowosseoyo.

This is a good phrase to end the evening with.

When can I see you again?

  • 언제 다시 볼 수 있어요?
  • Eonje dasi bol su isseoyo?

If he/she replied ‘Yes’ to ‘Can I see you again?’, this is the next important question.

I’ll call you.

  • 전화할게요.
  • Jeonhwahalgeyo.

Say this only if you really mean to do it. In many cultures, this could imply that you’re keeping the proverbial backdoor open.

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2. The Most Romantic Ideas for a Date

You learned all the Korean phrases to make a date - congratulations! Now you have to decide where to meet, which can be tricky. Discuss these options with your lover to gauge whether you like the same things. Check out romantic date ideas in Korean below!

Date Ideas in Korean

museum

  • 박물관
  • Bangmulgwan

If you’re looking for unique date ideas that are fun but won’t break the bank, museums are the perfect spot! You won’t be running out of things to say in the conversations.

candlelit dinner

  • 촛불 저녁 식사
  • chotbul jeonyeok siksa

A candlelit dinner is perhaps best to reserve for when the relationship is getting serious. It’s very intimate, and says: “Romance!” It’s a fantastic choice if you’re sure you and your date are in love with each other!

go to the zoo

  • 동물원에 가다
  • dongmurwone gada

This is a good choice for shy lovers who want to get the conversation going. Just make sure your date likes zoos, as some people dislike them. Maybe not for the first date, but this is also a great choice if your lover has children - you’ll win his/her adoration for inviting them along!

go for a long walk

  • 긴 산책을 하다
  • gin sanchaegeul hada

Need to talk about serious stuff, or just want to relax with your date? Walking together is soothing, and a habit you can keep up together always! Just make sure it’s a beautiful walk that’s not too strenuous.

go to the opera

  • 오페라에 가다
  • operae gada

This type of date should only be attempted if both of you love the opera. It can be a special treat, followed by a candlelit dinner!

go to the aquarium

  • 아쿠아리움에 가다
  • akuariume gada

Going to the aquarium is another good idea if you need topics for conversation, or if you need to impress your lover’s kids! Make sure your date doesn’t have a problem with aquariums.

walk on the beach

  • 해변을 걷다
  • haebyeoneul geotda

This can be a very romantic stroll, especially at night! The sea is often associated with romance and beauty.

have a picnic

  • 소풍을 가다
  • sopungeul gada

If you and your date need to get more comfortable together, this can be a fantastic date. Spending time in nature is soothing and calms the nerves.

cook a meal together

  • 함께 요리를 하다
  • hamkke yorireul hada

If you want to get an idea of your date’s true character in one go, this is an excellent date! You will quickly see if the two of you can work together in a confined space. If it works, it will be fantastic for the relationship and create a sense of intimacy. If not, you will probably part ways!

have dinner and see a movie

  • 저녁 먹고 영화 보다
  • jeonyeok meokgo yeonghwa boda

This is traditional date choice works perfectly well. Just make sure you and your date like the same kind of movies!

3. Must-know Valentine’s Day Vocabulary

Valentine's Day Words in Korean

Expressing your feelings honestly is very important in any relationship all year round. Yet, on Valentine’s Day you really want to shine. Impress your lover this Valentine’s with your excellent vocabulary, and make his/her day! We teach you, in fun, effective ways, the meanings of the words and how to pronounce them. You can also copy the characters and learn how to write ‘I love you’ in Korean - think how impressed your date will be!

4. Korean Love Phrases for Valentine’s Day

So, you now have the basic Valentine’s Day vocabulary under your belt. Well done! But, do you know how to say ‘I love you’ in Korean yet? Or perhaps you are still only friends. So, do you know how to say ‘I like you’ or ‘I have a crush on you’ in Korean? No? Don’t worry, here are all the love phrases you need to bowl over your Korean love on this special day!

Valentine's Day Words in Korean

I love you.

  • 사랑해요.
  • Saranghaeyo.

Saying ‘I love you’ in Korean carries the same weight as in all languages. Use this only if you’re sure and sincere about your feelings for your partner/friend.

You mean so much to me.

  • 당신은 나에게 무척 소중해요.
  • Dangsineun naege mucheok sojunghaeyo.

This is a beautiful expression of gratitude that will enhance any relationship! It makes the receiver feel appreciated and their efforts recognized.

Will you be my Valentine?

  • 나랑 사귈래?
  • Narang saguillae?

With these words, you are taking your relationship to the next level! Or, if you have been a couple for a while, it shows that you still feel the romance. So, go for it!

You’re so beautiful.

  • 정말 아름다우세요.
  • Jeongmal areumdauseyo.

If you don’t know how to say ‘You’re pretty’ in Korean, this is a good substitute, gentlemen!

I think of you as more than a friend.

  • 나는 너를 친구 이상으로 생각해.
  • Naneun neoreul chingu isangeuro saenggakae.

Say this if you are not yet sure that your romantic feelings are reciprocated. It is also a safe go-to if you’re unsure about the Korean dating culture.

A hundred hearts would be too few to carry all my love for you.

  • 백 개의 심장도 너를 향한 내 모든 사랑을 담기에는 너무 모자랄거야.
  • Baek gaeui simjangdo neoreul hyanghan nae modeun sarangeul damgieneun neomu mojaralgeoya.

You romantic you…! When your heart overflows with love, this would be the best phrase to use.

Love is just love. It can never be explained.

  • 사랑은 그저 사랑이다. 절대 설명 될 수 없다.
  • Sarangeun geujeo sarangida. Jeoldae seolmyeong doel su eopda.

If you fell in love unexpectedly or inexplicably, this one’s for you.

You’re so handsome.

  • 정말 잘생기셨어요.
  • Jeongmal jalsaenggisyeoseoyo.

Ladies, this phrase lets your Korean love know how much you appreciate his looks! Don’t be shy to use it; men like compliments too.

I’ve got a crush on you.

  • 나는 너에게 반했어.
  • Naneun neoege banhaeseo.

If you like someone, but you’re unsure about starting a relationship, it would be prudent to say this. It simply means that you like someone very, very much and think they’re amazing.

You make me want to be a better man.

  • 당신 덕분에 난 더 좋은 사람이 되고 싶어졌어요.
  • Dangsin deokbune nan deo joeun sarami doego sipeojyeoseoyo.

Gentlemen, don’t claim this phrase as your own! It hails from the movie ‘As Good as it Gets’, but it is sure to make your Korean girlfriend feel very special. Let her know that she inspires you!

Let all that you do be done in love.

  • 당신이 하는 모든 일이 사랑으로 행해지기를.
  • Dangsini haneun modeun iri sarangeuro haenghaejigireul.

We hope.

You are my sunshine, my love.

  • 내 사랑 당신은 내 행복의 근원이에요.
  • Nae sarang dangsineun nae haengbogui geunwonieyo.

A compliment that lets your lover know they bring a special quality to your life. Really nice!

Words can’t describe my love for you.

  • 말은 당신을 위한 내 사랑을 설명 할 수 없습니다.
  • Mareun dangsineul wihan nae sarangeul seolmyeong hal su eopseumnida.

Better say this when you’re feeling serious about the relationship! It means that your feelings are very intense.

We were meant to be together.

  • 우리는 천생연분이야.
  • Urineun cheonsaengyeonbuniya.

This is a loving affirmation that shows you see a future together, and that you feel a special bond with your partner.

If you were thinking about someone while reading this, you’re definitely in love.

  • 만약 이 글을 읽는 동안 누군가에 대해 생각하고 있었다면, 당신은 분명 사랑에 빠졌습니다.
  • Mannyak i geureul ingneun dongan nugungae daehae saenggakago iseotdamyeon, dangsineun bunmyeong sarange ppajyeotseumnida.

Here’s something fun to tease your lover with. And hope he/she was thinking of you!

5. Korean Quotes about Love

Korean Love Quotes

You’re a love champ! You and your Korean lover are getting along fantastically, your dates are awesome, your Valentine’s Day together was spectacular, and you’re very much in love. Good for you! Here are some beautiful phrases of endearment in Korean that will remind him/her who is in your thoughts all the time.

6. Marriage Proposal Lines

Korean Marriage Proposal Lines

Wow. Your Korean lover is indeed the love of your life - congratulations! And may only happiness follow the two of you! In most traditions, the man asks the woman to marry; this is also the Korean custom. Here are a few sincere and romantic lines that will help you to ask your lady-love for her hand in marriage.

7. 15 Most Common Break-Up Lines

Korean Break-Up Lines

Instead of moving towards marriage or a long-term relationship, you find that the spark is not there for you. That is a pity! But even though breaking up is never easy, continuing a bad or unfulfilling relationship would be even harder. Remember to be kind to the person you are going to say goodbye to; respect and sensitivity cost nothing. Here are some phrases to help you break up gently.

  • We need to talk.
    • 우리 얘기 좀 하자.
    • Uri yaegi jom haja.

    This is not really a break-up line, but it is a good conversation opener with a serious tone.

    It’s not you. It’s me.

    • 네가 아니야. 나야.
    • Nega aniya. Naya.

    As long as you mean it, this can be a kind thing to say. It means that there’s nothing wrong with your Korean lover as a person, but that you need something different from a relationship.

    I’m just not ready for this kind of relationship.

    • 난 그냥 이런 종류의 연애를 위한 준비가 안 됐어.
    • Nan geunyang ireon jongnyuui yeonaereul wihan junbiga an dwaesseo.

    Things moved a bit fast and got too intense, too soon? Painful as it is, honesty is often the best way to break up with somebody.

    Let’s just be friends.

    • 우리 그냥 친구하자.
    • Uri geunyang chinguhaja.

    If the relationship was very intense, and you have sent many ‘i love u’ texts in Korean, this would not be a good breakup line. Feelings need to calm down before you can be friends, if ever. If the relationship has not really developed yet, a friendship would be possible.

    I think we need a break.

    • 우리에게 휴식이 필요하다고 생각해.
    • Uriege hyusigi piryohadago saenggakae.

    This is again honest, and to the point. No need to play with someone’s emotions by not letting them know how you feel. However, this could imply that you may fall in love with him/her again after a period of time, so use with discretion.

    You deserve better.

    • 너는 내게 과분한 사람이야.
    • Neoneun naege gwabunhan saramiya.

    Yes, he/she probably deserves a better relationship if your own feelings have cooled down.

    We should start seeing other people.

    • 우리는 다른 사람을 만나기 시작해야 해.
    • Urineun dareun sarameul mannagi sijakaeya hae.

    This is probably the least gentle break-up phrase, so reserve it for a lover that doesn’t get the message!

    I need my space.

    • 내 공간이 필요해.
    • Nae gonggani piryohae.

    When a person is too clingy or demanding, this would be an suitable break-up phrase. It is another good go-to for that lover who doesn’t get the message!

    I think we’re moving too fast.

    • 우리 진도가 너무 빠른 것 같아.
    • Uri jindoga neomu ppareun geot gata.

    Say this if you want to keep the relationship, but need to slow down its progress a bit. It is also good if you feel things are getting too intense for your liking. However, it is not really a break-up line, so be careful not to mislead.

    I need to focus on my career.

    • 나는 일에 집중해야 해.
    • Naneun ire jipjunghaeya hae.

    If you feel that you will not be able to give 100% in a relationship due to career demands, this is the phrase to use. It’s also good if you are unwilling to give up your career for a relationship.

    I’m not good enough for you.

    • 나는 너에게 충분하지 않아.
    • Naneun neoege chungbunhaji ana.

    Say this only if you really believe it, or you’ll end up sounding false. Break-ups are usually hard for the receiving party, so don’t insult him/her with an insincere comment.

    I just don’t love you anymore.

    • 난 그냥 너를 더 이상 사랑하지 않아.
    • Nan geunyang neoreul deo isang saranghaji ana.

    This harsh line is sometimes the best one to use if you are struggling to get through to a stubborn, clingy lover who won’t accept your break up. Use it as a last resort. Then switch your phone off and block their emails!

    We’re just not right for each other.

    • 우리는 그냥 서로 안 맞아.
    • Urineun geunyang seoro an maja.

    If this is how you truly feel, you need to say it. Be kind, gentle and polite.

    It’s for the best.

    • 이게 최선이야.
    • Ige choeseoniya.

    This phrase is called for if circumstances are difficult and the relationship is not progressing well. Love should enhance one’s life, not burden it!

    We’ve grown apart.

    • 우리는 멀어졌어.
    • Urineun meoreojyeosseo.

    Cross-cultural relationships are often long-distance ones, and it is easy to grow apart over time.

  • 8. Will Falling in Love help you Learn Korean faster?

    Most people will agree that the above statement is a no-brainer - of course it will! Your body will be flooded with feel-good hormones, which are superb motivators for anything. KoreanClass101 is one of the best portals to help help make this a reality, so don’t hesitate to enroll now! Let’s quickly look at the reasons why falling in love will speed up your learning of the Korean language.

    Three Reasons Why Having a Lover will Help you Learn Korean Faster!

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    1- Being in a love relationship with your Korean speaking partner will immerse you in the culture
    KoreanClass101 uses immersive methods and tools to teach you Korean, but having a relationship with a native speaker will be a very valuable addition to your learning experience! You will gain exposure to their world, realtime and vividly, which will make the language come alive even more for you. The experience is likely to expand your world-view, which should motivate you to learn Korean even faster.

    2- Having your Korean romantic partner will mean more opportunity to practice speaking
    Nothing beats continuous practice when learning a new language. Your partner will probably be very willing to assist you in this, as your enhanced Korean language skills will enhance the relationship. Communication is, after all, one of the most important pillars of a good partnership. Also, you will get to impress your lover with the knowledge gained through your studies - a win/win situation!

    3- A supportive Korean lover is likely to make a gentle, patient teacher and study aid!
    With his/her heart filled with love and goodwill for you, your Korean partner is likely to patiently and gently correct your mistakes when you speak. This goes not only for grammar, but also for accent and meaning. With his/her help, you could sound like a native in no time!

    Three Reasons Why KoreanClass101 helps you learn Korean Even Faster when you’re In Love

    Start with a bonus, and download the ‘How To be a Good Lover Cheat Sheet’ for FREE! (Logged-In Member Only)

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to be a Good Lover in Korean

    1- All the Resources and Materials Will Help Both of You
    Falling in love with a man or woman speaking Korean is an opportunity for both of you to learn a new language! For this reason, every lesson, transcript, vocabulary list, and resource at KoreanClass101 is translated into both English and Korean. So, while your partner can help you learn Korean faster, you can potentially also help him/her learn and master English!

    2- Lessons Are Designed to Help You Understand and Engage with Korean Culture
    At KoreanClass101, our focus is to help our students learn practical vocabulary and phrases used by everyday people in Korea. This means that, from your very first lesson, you can apply what you learn immediately! So, when your Korean partner wants to go out to a restaurant, play Pokemon Go, or attend just about any social function, you have the vocabulary and phrases necessary to have a great time!

    3- Access to Special Resources Dedicated to Romantic Korean Phrases
    You now have access to KoreanClass101’s specially-developed sections and tools to teach you love words, phrases, and cultural insights to help you find and attract your Korean soul mate. A personal tutor will assist you to master these brilliantly - remember to invite him/her to your wedding!

    18 Useful Korean Greetings You Should Learn

    How to Say Hello in Korean

    When it comes to learning a new language, “hello” is the first word you learn. As the majority of language learners will agree, you’ll come to realize how many different ways there are to say hello in other languages, although you’re already using various greetings in your own language.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Improve Your Language Skills!

    Today, KoreanClass101 is going to introduce you to eighteen Korean greetings, both informal and formal. Let’s go through them one-by-one, so that you know exactly when to use these greetings next time you chat with your Korean friends. We hope you get the most from this Korean greetings guide!

    1. How to Say Hello in Korean: 4 Must-Know Greetings

    These four common Korean greetings are used often in South Korea and you may already know some of them, but let’s go through them one-by-one to review anyway. If you’re an absolute beginner, it’s okay. These aren’t difficult to memorize.

    1- 안녕 (Annyeong) — “Hello” (Informal)

    안녕 (Annyeong) is a casual and friendly Korean greeting used among friends and people of the same age who know each other. You can also say Annyeong to people who are younger than you. It’s similar in meaning to “What’s up?” or “Hey” in English, and it’s a gender-neutral greeting. Remember that this casual greeting cannot be used to greet people of a higher status—such as a teacher or a boss—or to the strangers that you meet everyday.

    Example: (A and B are friends)

    ※ Click on a word for pronunciation

    A: 안녕
    A: Annyeong
    A: “Hello”

    B: , 안녕
    B: Eo, annyeong.
    B: “Oh, hey”

    Boy Saying Hello

    2- 안녕하세요 (Annyeonghaseyo) — “Hello” (Formal)

    Annyeonghaseyo is a formal Korean greeting used for everyday conversations, and can be used in the majority of situations. This greeting is used to greet any strangers that you meet such as a cashier at the supermarket as well as people who are older than you, such as older family members.

    When you meet someone of the same age, you’ll need to greet them formally to show some respect. If you’re not sure whether to say hello in a formal or informal way, Annyeonghaseyo is safe to say.

    Example: (A is a cashier and B is a buyer)

    ※ Click on a word for pronunciation

    A: 안녕하세요, 봉투 필요하십니까?
    A: Annyeonghaseyo, bongtu piryohasimnikka?
    A: “Hello, would you like to have a plastic bag?”

    B: 안녕하세요, 아니요 괜찮아요.
    B: Annyeonghaseyo, aniyo gwaenchanayo.
    B: “Hello, no thank you.”

    3- 안녕하십니까 (Annyeonghasimnikka) — “Hello” (Formal, showing great respect)

    안녕하십니까 (Annyeonghasimnikka) isn’t commonly used on a daily basis. However, if you work in Korea, you’ll notice that people use this formal greeting everyday. This formal Korean greeting is commonly used in a business setting.

    Also, people who are serving in the military in Korea use this formal greeting every day, as they must use formal language.

    Example: (A visits B’s office and they meet for the first time)

    ※ Click on a word for pronunciation

    A: 안녕하십니까, 처음 뵙겠습니다. 마케팅 팀장 존이라고 합니다.
    A: Annyeonghasimnikka, Cheoeum Boepgetseumnida. Maketing Timjang Jonirago Hamnida.
    A: “How do you do, I’m John, the manager of Marketing team.”

    B: 반갑습니다. 세일즈팀 팀장 이민호라고 합니다.
    B: Bangapseumnida. Seiljeutim Timjang Iminhorago Hamnida.
    B: “It’s a pleasure to meet you. I’m Lee Minho, the manager of Sales team.”

    Korean Greetings

    4- 안뇽 (Annyong); 하이 (Hai) — “Hello” (Slang words)

    There are many ways to greet a friend in Korean while in South Korea, and this includes slang words, such as Annyong and Hai. 안뇽 (Annyong) is a slang word used to greet someone casually, and is usually used by women since it sounds feminine. 하이 (Hai), direct translation being “Hello” in English, is also a casual way to greet a friend.

    You’ll hear these two greetings a lot in South Korea. In addition, Koreans also use other slang words such as 하이룽 (Hairung), 방가방가 (Banggabangga), and many more. Please note that you don’t need to memorize all the slang words to say hello in Korean. KoreanClass101 has a lesson that covers Korean slang words, so feel free to check it out.

    Example: (A returns home from a trip and greets B who is her close friend)

    ※ Click on a word for pronunciation

    A: 안뇽, 나 왔어.
    A: Annyong, Na Wasseo.
    A: “Hey, I’m home.”

    B: 하이, 잘 갔다 왔어?
    B: Hai, Jal gatda Wasseo?
    B: “Hi, did you have fun?”

    Meeting Someone For The First Time

    2. Meeting Someone for the First Time

    When you meet someone for the first time, you need to be able to use appropriate Korean greeting phrases. You can definitely use one of the four must-know greetings mentioned above to greet someone depending on the age of the person you’re talking to, and the situation you’re in. Let’s learn what you can say after using these basic greetings to continue a conversation with this person.

    1- 만나서 반가워 (mannaseo bangawo) (Informal); 만나서 반갑습니다 (mannaseo bangapseumnida) (Formal)

    In English, this phrase is “Nice to meet you.”

    Example:

    ※ Click on a word for pronunciation

    안녕, 만나서 반가워.
    안녕하세요, 만나서 반갑습니다.

    2- 처음 뵙겠습니다. (cheoeum boepgetseumnida.) (Formal)

    This is another way to say, “Nice to meet you,” in Korean, and the direct translation is “I am meeting you for the first time.” Remember that there’s no informal phrase for 처음 뵙겠습니다. (cheoeum boepgetseumnida.); this phrase is usually used to greet elders or for a more formal setting.

    If you meet a person who’s older than you or who you met in a business setting, use this phrase instead of 처음 뵙겠습니다. (cheoeum boepgetseumnida.). Usually, (저는)000입니다 follows this phrase.

    Example:

    A: 처음 뵙겠습니다. 박소연입니다.
    A: cheoeum boepgetseumnida. baksoyeonimnida.
    A: “Nice to meet you. I’m Park Soyeon.”

    3- 잘 부탁해 (jal butakae) (Informal); 잘 부탁드립니다. (jal butakdeurimnida) (Formal)

    Many Korean learners become bewildered when they hear this phrase, because it sounds like the speaker is putting some pressure on the listener. This is because the literal translation is “Please take good care of me (or implied person).” However, this phrase actually has a slightly different meaning than what it first seems to mean.

    The classical example of when to use this Korean greeting would be when a new employee starts his new job. On his first day, he closes his self-introduction with 잘 부탁드립니다. (jal butakdeurimnida). This doesn’t mean, “It’s my first day, so please take good care of me.” On the contrary, this is generally a way of saying, “I look forward to working with you,” or “I will do my best,” to his employees. Essentially, it’s an informal way to say 잘 부탁해 (jal butakae).

    Example: (A and B are starting their jobs today)

    A: 안녕하세요, 오늘부터 일하게 된 제이슨이라고 합니다. 잘 부탁드립니다.
    A: annyeonghaseyo, oneulbuteo ilhage doen jeiseunirago hamnida. Jal butakdeurimnida.
    A: “Hello, this is my first day at work and I am Jason. I am looking forward to working with you.”

    B: 안녕하세요, 오늘부터 아르바이트 시작하게 된 브라이언이라고 합니다. 잘 부탁드립니다.
    B: annyeonghaseyo, oneulbuteo areubaiteu sijakage doen beuraieonirago hamnida. Jal butakdeurimnida.
    B: “Hello, this is my first day for my part-time job and I am Brian. I look forward to working with you.”

    4- 저는 ~에서 온 A이라고 합니다.

    In English, this is “I am A, from ~.” This Korean greeting phrase is commonly used to greet someone for the first time and when introducing yourself. Examples are written below.

    Example:

    A: 안녕하세요, 저는 미국에서 온 앨리스라고 합니다. 잘 부탁드립니다. (Formal)
    A: annyeonghaseyo, jeoneun migugeseo on aelliseurago hamnida. Jal butakdeurimnida.
    A: “Hello, my name is Alice, from America. I look forward to working with you.”

    B: 안녕, 나는 서울대학교에서 온 김나영이라고 해. 잘 부탁해. (Informal)
    B: annyeong, naneunseouldaehakgyoeseo on gimnayeongirago hae. Jalbutakae.
    B: “Hi, I am Kim Nayoung, from Seoul University. I look forward to studying with you.”

    There are many ways to say, “My name is…” in Korean including:

    • (저의 이름은) A(이)라고 합니다. (Formal)
      (jeoui ireumeun) A(i)rago hamnida.
    • (저의 이름은) A입니다. (Formal)
      (jeoui ireumeun) A imnida.
    • (나의 이름은) A(이)라고 해 (Informal)
      (naui ireumeun) A(i)rago hae
    • A(이)야 (Informal)
      A(i)ya

    In spoken language, we usually skip 나의 이름은/저의 이름은. This is the same as discarding “My name is” when introducing yourself in English.

    Hug

    3. How to Say “How Are You?” in Korean

    There is a number of ways to say “How are you?” in Korean and each phrase has a slightly different meaning, so let’s go through them one-by-one and learn an appropriate situation to say each of these Korean greetings.

    1- How are You Doing?

    • 잘 지냈어? (jal jinaesseo?) (Informal)
    • 잘 지내셨어요? (jal jinaesyeosseoyo?) (Formal)

    This is the most-used “How are you?” phrase in Korea. It’s a simple and casual greeting and is a great way to start a conversation. Usually Koreans say 안녕 (Annyeong) or 안녕하세요 (Annyeonghaseyo), followed by 잘 지냈어? (jal jinaesseo?) or 잘 지내셨어요? (jal jinaesyeosseoyo?), so try to memorize it as a full sentence.

    Example: (A and B are friends and A is younger than B)

    A: 안녕하세요, 잘 지내셨어요? (Formal)
    A: annyeonghaseyo, jal jinaesyeosseoyo?
    A: “Hello, how are you doing?”

    B: 어, 안녕. (진짜 오랜만이다.) 잘 지냈어?
    B: eo, annyeong. (jinjja oraenmanida.) jal jinaesseo?
    B: “Ah, hey. (Long time, no see.) How are you?”

    2- What are You Doing These Days?

    • 뭐하고 지내? (mwohago jinae?) (Informal)
    • 어떻게 지내세요? (eotteoke jinaeseyo?) (Formal)

    These phrases are used if you haven’t met with someone in a few days or more. If you’re curious to know what the person has been up to lately, use this phrase. Often they’ll talk about a current activity they’re doing, such as a new hobby or a project that the person has been working on at work lately.

    Example: (A and B are friends; C and D are colleagues)

    A: 요즘 뭐하고 지내?
    A: Yojeum mwohago jinae?
    A: “What are you doing these days?”

    B: 나? 나야 뭐 항상 똑같지뭐.
    B: Na? Naya mwo hangsang ttokgatjimwo.
    B: “Me? It’s always the same.”

    C: 요즘 어떻게 지내세요?
    C: yojeum eotteoke jinaeseyo?
    C: “What are you doing these days?”

    D: 최근에 새로 시작한 마케팅 캠페인 때문에 정신이 없어요.
    D: choegeune saero sijakan maketing kaempein ttaemune jeongsini eopseoyo.
    D: “I have been really busy since I’ve just started working on a marketing campaign.”

    3- What Have You Been Up To?

    • 뭐하고 지냈어? (mwohago jinaesseo?) (Informal)
    • 어떻게 지내셨어요? (eotteoke jinaesyeosseoyo?) (Formal)

    Use these phrases if you haven’t seen someone for a long time (e.g. one year or more), and want to know everything about what that person has been up to. It’s a great Korean greeting phrase to use to catch up with someone.

    Example:

    A: 뭐하고 지냈어?
    A: mwohago jinaesseo?
    A: “What have you been up to?”

    B: 음.. 사실 남자친구랑 헤어져서 맨날 집에서 시간 보내고 있어.
    B: eum… sasil namjachingurang heeojyeoseo maennal jibeseo sigan bonaego isseo.
    B: “Hmm… Actually I broke up with my ex-boyfriend so I have been just staying home.”

    4- Long Time, No See

    • 진짜 오랜만이다. (jinjja oraenmanida.) (Informal)
    • 정말 오랜만이에요. (jeongmal oraenmanieyo.) (Formal)

    Use this Korean phrase when you meet someone whom you haven’t met with for a long time and want to express how excited you are to meet them again.

    Example: (A and B are friends; C and D are colleagues)

    A: 우와, 진짜 오랜만이다.
    A: uwa, jinjja oraenmanida.
    A: “Wow, long time no see.”

    B: 하하, 정말 반갑다야.
    B: haha, jeongmal bangapdaya.
    B: “Haha, it’s really nice to meet you again.”

    C: 진짜 오랜만이에요. 잘 지내셨어요?
    C: jinjja oraenmanieyo. Jal jinaesyeosseoyo?
    C: “It’s been awhile, how are you doing?”

    D: 응, 그럼. 잘 지내고 있지.
    D: eung, geureom. Jal jinaego itji.
    D: “Yes I am doing well.”

    Alarm Clock

    4. How to Say “Good morning” in Korean

    1- Good Morning

    • 좋은 아침이에요. (joeun achimieyo) (Formal)
    • 좋은 아침 (joeun achim) (Informal)
    • 굿모닝 (gunmoning) (Informal and casual greeting)
    Example:

    A: 좋은 아침!
    A: joeun achim!
    A: “Good morning!”

    B: 굿모닝, 잘잤어?
    B: gunmoning, jaljasseo?
    B: “Good morning, did you sleep well?”

    2- Did You Sleep Well?

    • 안녕히 주무셨어요? (annyeonghi jumusyeosseoyo?) (Formal)
    • 잘 잤어? (jal jasseo?) (Informal)
    Example:
    • 할머니, 안녕히 주무셨어요? (Formal)
      halmeoni, annyeonghi jumusyeosseoyo?
      “Grandmother, did you sleep well?”
    • 소연아 잘 잤어? (Informal)
      soyeona jal jasseo?
      “Did you sleep well, Soyeon?”

    5. How to Say “Good Night” in Korean

    1- Have a Good Sleep

    • 안녕히 주무세요. (annyeonghi jumuseyo.) (Formal)
    • 잘자 (jalja) (Informal)

    안녕히 주무세요. (annyeonghi jumuseyo.) is a formal greeting to say “Good night” in Korean. Also, remember that bowing is very important in Korea. The appropriate way to say good night to the elders is to bow and say the greeting.

    On the other hand, when you say good night to your friend, you don’t need to bow. Instead, you can just wave your hand or nod once at your friend. The gesture of nodding is a very common body language greeting among friends in Korea; just think of it as a casual way of bowing.

    Example:

    A: 너무 피곤해서 자야할 것 같습니다. 안녕히 주무세요. (Bow)
    A: neomu pigonhaeseo jayahal geot gatseumnida. annyeonghi jumuseyo.
    A: “I am exhausted, I think I should go to bed. Good night.”

    B: 알겠어요. 푹 쉬세요.
    B: algesseoyo. puk swiseyo.
    B: “I understand, rest well.”

    2- Good night

    • 굿나잇 (gunnait) (Informal and casual friendly greeting)
    • 굿밤 (gutbam) (Slang)

    Simple English phrases are commonly used among younger people. Also, 굿밤 (gutbam) is a slang word that’s also used commonly by younger people as well.

    Phone Call

    6. How to Greet on the Phone

    1- 여보세요. (yeoboseyo.)

    This Korean greeting is to say “hello” when answering the phone. You’ll hear this all the time when you call someone on the phone. However, in a business setting, people usually address the name of the company, then the name. 여보세요. (yeoboseyo.) is rarely used in a business setting.

    여보세요. (yeoboseyo.) also has another meaning; it’s used when you’re trying to get the attention of someone. However, it does portray a negative connotation, so try not to use this unless you want to initiate an argument.

    Example: (A and B are friends; D is calling his friend and his mother, C, picked up the phone)

    A: 여보세요.
    A: yeoboseyo.
    A: “Hello.”

    B: 뭐해?
    B: mwohae?
    B: “What are you up to?”

    C: 여보세요.
    C: yeoboseyo.
    C: “Hello.”

    D: 안녕하세요, 지연이 친구인데요, 지연이 바꿔주실 수 있으세요?
    D: annyeonghaseyo, jiyeoni chinguindeyo, jiyeoni bakkwojusil su isseuseyo?
    D: “Hello, I’m a friend of Jiyeon, could you please put me through to Jiyeon?”

    2- ~때문에 연락 드렸습니다. (~ttaemune yeollak deuryeotseumnida.) (Formal)

    This Korean greeting phrase for answering the phone is usually used right after 안녕하세요 (Annyeonghaseyo) or 여보세요. (yeoboseyo.). It’s commonly used in a business setting. If you want to sound formal, you can say, 안녕하세요 (Annyeonghaseyo), ~때문에 연락 드렸습니다. (~ttaemune yeollak deuryeotseumnida.).

    Also, you can use this phrase in any formal situation. If you want to sound less formal and more friendly with a casual phrase—let’s say you’re calling your friend—there’s an informal Korean phrase to use, which is ~때문에 전화했어. (~ttaemune jeonhwahaesseo). Note that you can only use a noun in front of ~때문에 (~ttaemune).

    Example:

    안녕하세요, 광고비 결제 때문에 연락드렸습니다.
    annyeonghaseyo, gwanggobi gyeolje ttaemune yeollakdeuryeotseumnida.
    “Hello, I am calling you because of the advertising fee.”

    7. A Little Something Extra…

    1- How to Say Hello in Korean Sign Language

    Sign language is a visual language that uses hand shapes, gestures, and body language to communicate with deaf people. For an additional fun way to learn the Korean language, this video demonstrates the Korean sign language way of saying “Hello” and “Nice to meet you.”

    2- North Korean Dialect: How to Say Hello

    South and North Korea speak the same language, but as time went on by, the language also evolved. Many words are spoken differently and with a different flow between the two Koreas. For those of you who are interested to know how to say hello in North Korean, it’s 동무들 반갑습니다. (Dongmudeul bangapseumnida.).

    8. Let’s Test Your Korean Greeting Skills!

    Let’s test your Korean greeting skills. We’ve prepared three questions for you. Try to solve each question with the knowledge you’ve gained from this Korean greetings guide.

    Question 1:

    You’re at a department store, trying to buy nice furniture. A staff member approaches and greets you. How would you respond?

    스태프: 손님, 안녕하십니까, 무엇을 도와드릴까요?
    seutaepeu: sonnim, annyeonghasimnikka, mueoseul dowadeurilkkayo?
    Staff: Hello, how may I help you?
    You: _____________, 가구를 보고 있어요.
    You: _____________, gagureul bogo isseoyo.
    You: “ _____________, I am looking for a furniture.”

    A. 안녕 (annyeong)
    B. 하이룽 (hairung)
    C. 안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo)
    D. 여보세요 (yeoboseyo)

    Question 2:

    You’re a marketing manager. You’ve received an important email from KoreanClass101 and want to ask a few questions after reading it.

    김유진: 네, 코리안클래스101의 김유진입니다.
    Kim Yujin: ne, koriankeullaeseu101ui gimyujinimnida.
    Kim Yujin: “This is Kim Yujin, from KoreanClass101.”
    You: _________________________________.

    A. 여보세요, 저 수지인데요, 지민이 바꿔주시면 안될까요?
    (yeoboseyo, jeo sujiindeyo, jimini bakkwojusimyeon andoelkkayo?)
    B. 안녕하세요, 금일 보내주신 이메일을 읽고 연락 드렸습니다.
    (annyeonghaseyo, geumil bonaejusin imeireul ilgo yeollak deuryeotseumnida.)
    C. 동무들 반갑습니다.
    (dongmudeul bangapseumnida.)
    D. 어, 나야 이메일 읽고 연락했어.
    (eo, naya imeil ilgo yeollakaesseo.)

    Question 3:

    You ran into an old friend that you haven’t seen for more than ten years.

    A: 어머, 진짜 오랜만이다. 잘 지냈어?
    A: eomeo, jinjja oraenmanida. Jal jinaesseo?
    A: “Oh my goodness, long time no see. What have you been up to?”

    B: ________________, 응 나야 잘 지냈지.
    B: ________________, eung naya jal jinaetji.
    B: “________________, yea I’ve been great.”

    A. 정말 오랜만입니다.
    (jeongmal oraenmanimnida.)
    B. 잘 주무셨어요?
    (jal jumusyeosseoyo?)
    C. 진짜 오랜만이다.
    (jinjja oraenmanida.)

    Answers:

    1. C
    2. B
    3. C

    Girl Studying

    9. How KoreanClass101 Can Help You with Korean

    We hope you found this article very educational. KoreanClass101 has many free lessons for you to improve your Korean. If you want to learn how to say not only hello, but also goodbye at your workplace, we have a lesson for you, so feel free to check it out.

    If you want to review how to say hello with a native Korean speaker, we have a lesson called 10 Ways to Say Hello as well. Also feel free to use Korean Resources on our website to study Korean at your own pace. Good luck with studying Korean. Now get out there and start putting your newfound Korean greeting knowledge to good use!

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    7 Most Effective Language Apps to Fast-Track Your Learning

    Downloading App

    Learning a new language after childhood is one of the most difficult things we attempt to do. It gets even more difficult learning a foreign language, one that is very unfamiliar in your immediate world. However, for one reason or another, or just for fun, we still find ourselves trying to learn a new language at some point in life. To make the learning fun, simplified and interesting, we often look for various aids. Some of the most useful resources are applications which we use on our mobile devices or personal computers.

    App developers have put too much in app stores, so sometimes it is quite difficult to single out the best apps for our learning needs – those with reliable lessons and affordable tuition rates if any are inclusive. Here are the best apps for an interesting language learning experience.

    1. Innovative Language 101

    This app from Innovative Language Learning and it offers audio and video lessons and study tools for 34 languages including Korean, Spanish, French, Japanese, Chinese, Arabic, etc. This app is available on Android, from the App Store and on Kindle Fire. It is suitable for both newcomers to Korean and more seasoned speakers, and it is designed to get you speaking and using Korean from the very first lesson. This app gives you access to a multitude of audio and video lessons by trained teachers, as well as a variety of other resources. Best of all, the app is free!

    Many who have tried the app have appreciated the way in which it is based on real language (i.e. the language that real natives speak) rather than rather stilted and unnatural textbook-speak.

    Downloading App

    2. Duolingo

    This is one of the most incredible resources in language learning. It is a popular point of comparison while exploring other apps. Any time you mention another app, someone will ask you, Is it as good as Duolingo?’ The app boasts over a hundred million downloads in app stores. It is free and blends gaming features with your learning experience.

    This app is not popular just for the sake of it. Its courses are developed by native speakers in every language it teaches, hence making it a reliable tutor. Another reason to fall in love with this app is that it does not assume you’re a native English speaker if you’re not. If your first language is not English, you can still comfortably make use of this incredible resource for second language learning. You will also enjoy the app on your device since it maximizes your touchscreen features such as drag and drop. In the app, you will find 81 courses which are well-structured, interesting, friendly to the mind and easy to learn. The lessons offer a good balance between vocabulary and grammar in the languages.

    Memrise

    3. Memrise

    This app can be described in two words, meme game.’ Possibly, that’s where it got its name from. This app focuses on vocabulary learning, and it found a way to make the lessons more fun than formal. It has an extensive collection of popular instructive sources and widely used vocabulary.

    To make learning enjoyable, the app makes witty use of the learned words. The courses are spiced with memes whose primary function is to enhance memory of the learned vocabulary. The fun bit is, these memes are created by users and you too can add yours to the bank! The more active you are, the more you rise in the users’ ladder.

    This app is one of the few in the market which is user-centered. You can get in to learn as much as you want, and you can also participate in enlightening others. However, be careful with it – some fellow users may mislead you. Nonetheless, if you’re looking for interactive language learning, just join the Memrise community.

    Word Power

    4. WordPower Korean

    This app is dedicated to learners of the Korean language. If you’re looking to learn the basics in Korean, then all you need is this app and a little curiosity. It teaches the most basic words and phrases – those that are used on a daily basis in Korea. It has about 2000 phrases and words which are used in various aspects of daily life such as weather, shopping, travel and many other places.

    The app is ideal for a person looking to learn basic Korean language - one who may be visiting or moving to the place, or just curious to learn some Korean. But if you want to learn other Korean aspects such as grammar and proficiency, you will need more resources.

    Learning

    5. Busuu

    This is undisputedly one of the most serious teachers of language you’ll come across out there. It features 12 languages in full courses. For full access to all resources, you should prepare to part with $17 per month. The app is keen on teaching language right from the basics – starting with individual words and short dialogues, it advances all the way to complex bits of a language.

    The lessons are topically organized and are accompanied by audio versions which will teach you the native pronunciation of words and phrases. In addition, this is one app that is considerate of the reason for learning – for people planning to visit places where the target language is spoken, the app has a designated mini “travel course” which teaches the basics of a language. This incredible course also provides a platform where you can engage native speakers for an enhanced learning experience. In the desktop version, you can even live-chat with them. Bottomline, if you are looking for a dedicated language teacher, Busuu is waiting for you.

    Electronic Class

    6. Livemocha

    Well, this is what I’d refer to as an electronic class.’ Livemocha has all the features of a typical learning scenario – it just happens in-app. It features premium membership at a fee. To begin with, the app covers over 35 languages. It has separate learning places for reading, listening, speaking and writing skills. The lessons are structured so that they expose you to new material before assessing your understanding by asking you to apply the learned content. Lesson credits are awarded to learners who are willing to become virtual tutors to fellow learners by reviewing their work. It also allows you to interact with other learners and native speakers.

    For a personalized learning experience, you may join a virtual lesson or book a private tutor for online sessions. This app is an incredible place to interact with native speakers for a great learning experience. If you are generous enough, it’s a place for you to deliver to others as much as you receive. In any case, that’s the best way to learn.

    7. Daily Dose of Language

    This is also from KoreanClass101, and it’s available on Android, from the App Store and on Kindle Fire. This app provides fun and easy lessons for free every day for various languages. As all language learners know, the best strategy for learning anything, and particularly a language, is to do a little every day. That is why ‘Daily Dose’ is so useful. It gives you a mini lesson a day from which you can learn new phrases and words, and it will not overwhelm you, so you will retain much of your daily dose.

    This is another free app, and it will allow you to feel like you are making progress everyday in your language skills. However, if you want, you can have access to the full library of 365 lessons, so you can peruse them at your leisure.

    Conclusion

    Apps are ideal for learning in the modern world. They enable you to learn without having to peruse loads of books or taking down notes. Since they are accessible at any time, you should make it a personal responsibility to learn a new language anywhere, any time. If you are passionate enough, technology will always be a great resource for you. Learn a new language and stand out from the crowd. Don’t be among the multitudes who only know two or three local languages.


    Annabelle is part of the Content and Community team at SmileTutor, sharing valuable content to their own community and beyond.

    How to Celebrate April Fools’ Day in Korean

    How to Celebrate April Fools' Day in Korean!

    Most everyone is familiar with this day, as it is celebrated nearly everywhere the world. Yet, when exactly is April Fools’ Day? And where did April Fools come from? April Fools’ Day is observed on April 1st every year. This day of jokes and pranks is believed to have stemmed from the 16th-century calendar change in France, when New Year’s Day was moved from April 1 to January 1. This action was taken due to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.

    However, a few people were resistant to the calendar change, so they continued to observe New Year’s Day on April 1st, rather than the new date. They were referred to as the “April Fools”, and others started playing mocking tricks on them. This custom endured, and is practiced to this day around the world!

    Table of Contents

    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day
    2. Korean Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day
    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody
    4. How Can KoreanClass101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?
    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Korean - Testing New Technology

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    1. Top One Million Words You Need to Know for April Fools’ Day

    Do you want to know how to say April Fools’ Day in Korean? Well, there are millions of ways and words, but here are the top one million Korean words you really need to know! Simply click this link. Here are some of them you will find useful:

    1. funny - 웃기는 - uggineun
    2. joke - 농담하다 - nongdamhada
    3. lie - 거짓말 - gyeojinmal
    4. surprise - 놀라다 - nollada
    5. sneaky - 몰래 - mollae
    6. prankster - 장난꾸러기 - jangnankkureogi
    7. prank - 장난 - jangnan
    8. play a joke - 장난을 치다 - jangnaneul chida
    9. humor - 유머 - yumeo
    10. fool - 바보 - babo
    11. deceptive - 속이는 - sogineun
    12. April 1st - 4월 1일 - sawol iril

    2. Korean Phrases You Can Use on April Fools’ Day

    Korean Phrases for April Fools' Day

    Don’t limit yourself to practical jokes - use these April Fools’ phrases in Korean to prank your favorite Korean friend or colleague!

    1. I learned Korean in 1 month.
      • 나는 1 달 만에 한국어를 배웠어.
      • Naneun han dal mane hangugeoreul baewoseo.
    2. All classes for today got canceled.
      • 오늘 모든 수업이 취소됐어.
      • Oneul modeun sueobi chwisodwaeseo.
    3. I’m sorry, but I’ve just broken your favorite pair of glasses.
      • 미안한데 나 방금 네가 가장 좋아하는 안경을 부러뜨렸어.
      • Mianhande na banggeum nega gajang joahaneun angyeongeul bureotteuryeoseo.
    4. Someone has just hit your car.
      • 어떤 사람이 방금 네 차를 쳤어.
      • Eotteon sarami banggeum ne chareul chyeoseo.
    5. I’m getting married.
      • 나 결혼해.
      • Na gyeolhonhae.
    6. You won a free ticket.
      • 공짜 티켓에 당첨되셨습니다.
      • Gongjja tikese dangcheomdoesyeotseumnida.
    7. I saw your car being towed.
      • 네 차가 견인되는 걸 봤어.
      • Ne chaga gyeonindoeneun geol bwaseo.
    8. They’re giving away free gift cards in front of the building.
      • 사람들이 건물 앞에서 무료 상품권을 나눠주고 있어.
      • Saramdeuri geonmul apeseo muryo sangpumgwoneul nanwojugo iseo.
    9. A handsome guy is waiting for you outside.
      • 잘 생긴 남자가 밖에서 널 기다리고 있어.
      • Jal saenggin namjaga bakkeseo neol gidarigo iseo.
    10. A beautiful lady asked me to give this phone number to you.
      • 예쁜 여자가 너한테 이 전화 번호를 전해달래.
      • Yeppeun yeojaga neohante i jeonhwa beonhoreul jeonhaedallae.
    11. Can you come downstairs? I have something special for you.
      • 아래층으로 내려 올래? 널 위해 특별히 준비한 게 있어.
      • Araecheungeuro naeryeo ollae? Neol wihae teukbyeolhi junbihan ge iseo.
    12. Thank you for your love letter this morning. I never could have guessed your feelings.
      • 오늘 아침 러브레터 고마워. 나는 절대 네 마음을 알아차리지 못했을 거야.
      • Oneul achim reobeureteo gomawo. Naneun jeoldae ne maeumeul arachariji motaeseul geoya.

    Choose your victims carefully, though; the idea is to get them to laugh with you, not to hurt their feelings or humiliate them in front of others. Be extra careful if you choose to play a prank on your boss - you don’t want to antagonize them with an inappropriate joke.

    3. Some of the Coolest April Fools’ Pranks To Play on Anybody

    Choose Bad or Good

    Right, now that you know the top million April Fools’ words in Korean, let’s look at some super pranks and tricks to play on friends, colleagues and family. Some April Fools ideas never grow old, while new ones are born every year.

    Never joke in such a way that it hurts anyone, or humiliates them badly in front of others - the idea is for everybody to laugh and enjoy the fun! Respect is still key, no matter what day of the year it is.

    Cockroach prank

    1- Infestation

    This trick is so simple, yet so creepy, it’s almost unbelievable. Take black paper, cut out the silhouette of a giant cockroach, a spider or another insect, and stick it inside the lampshade of a table lamp. When the lamp is switched on, it will look like a monstrous insect is sitting inside the lampshade. Or, get a whole lot of realistic-looking plastic insects, and spread them over a colleague’s desk and chair, or, at home, over the kids’ beds etc. Creep-factor: stellar.

    2- Which One Doesn’t Fit?

    Put the photo of a celebrity or a notorious politician in a frame, and take it to work on April Fools’ Day. Hang the photo on the staff picture wall, and wait. You’ll be surprised how long it can take for people to notice that one picture doesn’t fit.

    3- Something Weird in the Restroom

    At work, replace the air freshener in the restroom with something noxious like insect killer, oven cleaner or your own odious mixture in a spray bottle. Be sure to cover the bottle’s body so no one suspects a swap.

    Or paint a bar of soap with clear nail polish, and leave it at the hand wash basin. It will not lather.

    Or, if your workplace’s restroom has partitioned toilets with short doors, arrange jeans or trousers and shoes on all but one of the toilet covers, so it looks like every stall is occupied. Now wait for complaints, and see how long it takes for someone to figure out the April Fools’ Day prank. You’ll probably wish you had a camera inside the restroom. But, unless you don’t mind getting fired, don’t put your own recording device in there!

    Funny Face

    4- Call Me Funny

    Prepare and print out a few posters with the following instructions: Lion Roar Challenge! Call this number - 123-456-7890 - and leave your best lion’s roar as voicemail! Best roarer will be announced April 10 in the cafeteria. Prize: $100. (Lion’s roar is just an example; you can use any animal call, or even a movie character’s unique sound, such as Chewbacca from Star Wars. The weirder, the funnier. Obviously!) Put the posters up in the office where most of the staff is likely to see them. Now wait for the owner of the number to visit you with murderous intent. Have a conciliatory gift ready that’s not a prank.

    5- Minty Cookies

    This is another simple but hugely effective prank - simply separate iced cookies, scrape off the icing, and replace it with toothpaste. Serve during lunch or tea break at work, or put in your family’s lunch boxes. Be sure to take photos of your victim’s faces when they first bite into your April Fools’ cookies.

    6- Wild Shopping

    At your local grocer, place a realistic-looking plastic snake or spider among the fresh vegetables. Now wait around the corner for the first yell.

    7- The Oldest Trick in the Book

    Don’t forget probably the oldest, yet very effective April Fools’ joke in the book - smearing hand cream or Vaseline on a door handle that most staff, family or friends are likely to use. Yuck to the max!

    8- Sneeze On Me

    Another golden oldie is also gross, yet harmless and utterly satisfying as a prank. Fill a small spray bottle that you can easily conceal with water. Walk past a friend, colleague or one of your kids, and fake a sneeze while simultaneously spraying them with a bit of water. Expect to be called a totally disgusting person. Add a drop of lovely smelling essential oil to the water for extra confusion.

    9- Word Play Repairs

    Put a fresh leek in the hand wash basin at home or work, and then tell your housemates or colleagues this: “There’s a huge leak in the restroom/bathroom basin, it’s really serious. Please can someone go have a look?!” Expect exasperation and smiles all around. Note that this prank is only likely to work where people understand English well.

    10- Scary Face

    Print out a very scary face on an A4 sheet of paper, and place it in a colleague’s, or one of your kid’s drawers, so it’s the first thing they see when they open the drawer. You may not be very popular for a while.

    11- Wake Up To Madness

    Put foamy shaving cream, or real whipped cream on your hand, and wake your kid up by tickling their nose with it. As long as they get the joke, this could be a wonderful and fun way to start April Fools’ Day.

    Computer Prank

    12- Computer Prank

    This one’s fabulous, if you have a bit of time to fiddle with a colleague, friend or your kid’s computer. It is most effective on a computer where most of the icons they use are on the desktop background itself (as opposed to on the bottom task bar).

    Take and save a screenshot of their desktop with the icons. Set this screenshot as their background image. Now delete all the working icons. When they return to their computer, wait for the curses when no amount of clicking on the icons works.

    13- Monster Under the Cup

    This one will also work well anywhere people meet. Take a paper cup, and write the following on it in black pen: “Danger! Don’t lift, big spider underneath.” Place it upside-down on prominent flat surface, such as a kitchen counter, a colleague’s desk or a restaurant table. Expect some truly interesting responses.

    Door Prank

    14- Prank Door

    Write in large letters on a large and noticeable piece of paper: PUSH. Tape this notice on a door that should be pulled to open, and watch the hilarious struggle of those clever souls who actually read signs.

    4. How Can KoreanClass101 Make Your April Fools’ Day Special?

    If you happen to visit Korea, or if you work for any Korean company, knowing the above Korean prankster phrases can really lighten up your day. Showing you have a sense of humor can go a long way to cement good relationships in any situation. These phrases are at your disposal for free, as well as are these 100 core Korean words, which you will learn how to pronounce perfectly.

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - How to Master A Language!

    Also, don’t stop at learning April Fools’ phrases in Korean - bone up your Korean language skills with these FREE key phrases. Yes, KoreanClass101 doesn’t joke when it comes to effective, fun and easy learning.

    Now, as a bonus, test our super-learning technology, and learn the Top 1000 most useful phrases in Korean below! But that’s not all. Read on to learn how you can be eligible for large enrollment discounts at KoreanClass101.

    5. Top 1000 Most Useful Phrases in Korean - testing new technology

    Help us by being a language guinea pig! Listen to this video above with embedded cutting-edge, frequency-based learning technology that enables you to learn large amounts of data in record time.

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