Start Learning Korean in the next 30 Seconds with
a Free Lifetime Account

Or sign up using Facebook

Huge Korean Anki deck with audio, sentences and hanja.

Got a great resource to talk about? Share info on Korean language learning websites, Korean learning methods, Korean language books, Korean dictionaries and more.
imaBALLER
Established Presence
Posts: 77
Joined: November 29th, 2009 8:54 pm

Postby imaBALLER » February 8th, 2010 8:20 am

Hi,

I personally have a deck of about 1600 at the moment, not all of them have audio though... I think it is better to make your own deck because then it is personalised to your interests and more likely to sustain concentration.

It interested me that you mentioned the importance of Hanja. A few people have told me this is important, however, I have yet to come across any in my study, sorry, that's not true, I have seen a few... but a very few.

I am just a beginner though, so i am going to trust the people who are a bit further along than me and try and start on hanja...

kmanley
New in Town
Posts: 13
Joined: October 10th, 2007 12:07 am

Postby kmanley » February 8th, 2010 3:41 pm

I look at this deck as a bit of a a parallel to smart.fm's core lists, which I found to be a benefit to my Japanese vocab even though the deck wasn't personalized. As you'll see on some of the cards in this deck I use the edit button to make notes on the cards and slowly personalize it. In the end I'm using this deck to supplement my other Korean anki decks, not replace it.

This is my first time trying to use hanja in my study, I don't know if this deck will be effective for it. But I hope it can give me a bit of an edge.

Get Up to 45% OFF Here
eejot
New in Town
Posts: 9
Joined: July 13th, 2008 10:25 pm
Location: Donghae, Gangwon-do
Contact:

Postby eejot » February 11th, 2010 10:31 am

imaBALLER wrote:It interested me that you mentioned the importance of Hanja. A few people have told me this is important, however, I have yet to come across any in my study, sorry, that's not true, I have seen a few... but a very few.

I am just a beginner though, so i am going to trust the people who are a bit further along than me and try and start on hanja...


If you're not interested in actually learning to write the hanja... recognising them is more than enough. IMO, the point of study hanja is to learn the cognates between words. "The Handbook of Korean Vocabulary" is a great example of this - through looking at a single character you can see a list of the derivatives of the characters and this will help you later on when you need to guess something. If you recognise one character from a two character word then you're halfway there (obviously :P), but from the context of the sentence you can probably guess that other half quite accurately. Sometimes it's even easier when you know both characters individually and can just piece the meaning together :)

Also.. if you have dreams of Japanese or Chinese later on, you can get a big headstart through recognising the hanja :)

imaBALLER
Established Presence
Posts: 77
Joined: November 29th, 2009 8:54 pm

Postby imaBALLER » February 14th, 2010 8:41 am

I have 1026 kanji that I have learned through Heisig, although at the moment that deck is REALLY in need of review. I think I have 400 reviews pending and another 300 failed :( So I think I am going to go ahead and pick this up again, because, as you said it will help if I ever want to learn japanese, which I do!

muzioler
New in Town
Posts: 7
Joined: January 21st, 2009 8:10 am
Location: 서울

Postby muzioler » February 19th, 2010 2:28 pm

I agree with the previous poster that its better to create your own list; however I am willing to give my Anki list to people if they want it. There are 0 audio ones attached; however I have a total of 7400 cards with about 150 basic 한자 mixed in. The level isn't too bad either since Im not that good... it only goes up to low intermediate.

Just wondering... what are your guys Anki statistics? For me, Im hovering around 93% for the mature and 88% overall. Also, my longest wait for a word is Banana which I'll sadly won't see again until November 2014. Hopefully I'll still be ankiing then. Worst word, by the way, is 국적 which Ive screwed up an amazing 34 out of 100 times

imaBALLER
Established Presence
Posts: 77
Joined: November 29th, 2009 8:54 pm

Postby imaBALLER » February 19th, 2010 3:01 pm

That my friend is pretty hefty deck. It surprises me that you have 7500 cards and they only go to lower intermediate?

Like I said I have 1700 hundred cards, mostly composed from 4 seasons of beginner lessons on kclass101. I think by around 4000 cards I should be through most intermediate material... pure speculation though.

I don't have as many statistics as you (maybe cos I am running mac version?), but my mature is 91.4 and my overall is 94.1.

I have heard it said that the idea is to keep srsing until reviews are longer than your lifespan :shock:

It's funny how some words you just keep forgetting. What I do now is when something doesn't stick I normally spend a little extra time on it or make a mnemonic.

muzioler
New in Town
Posts: 7
Joined: January 21st, 2009 8:10 am
Location: 서울

Postby muzioler » February 19th, 2010 6:12 pm

I have 7400 cards that go to low intermediate simply because A) I double them with the recognition and production elements and B) I enter a ***CENSORED*** load of stuff. A lot of random stuff too. Its nice because my vocab tends to be higher than my actual level; however my speaking and listening have really suffered (hence why I am here now).

I must say though... Korean Class 101 does a pretty good job at helping you find good sentences for Anki. The way that they put new vocab in new sentences is really, really cool.

Thats pretty good if you're doing 94.1 as mature and 91.4 overall (Im assuming you flipped them accidentally... otherwise I am very impressed). I got the other stats simply by looking at the "browse cards" and messing around with those. I've been doing Anki for almost 2 years and its really, really cool to see how the time you've put in has been spent.

The only thing I really have problems with mnemonics is when you get a word that is so close to others. 국적 kills me because it is so close to 전국 and 천국 in my head. I know I should just delete them, but I have begun carrying around a list of the words that get me the most.

Still... pretty cool to see other people's numbers.

/end Anki product placement

imaBALLER
Established Presence
Posts: 77
Joined: November 29th, 2009 8:54 pm

Postby imaBALLER » February 19th, 2010 7:01 pm

Oh, I see. I only do recognition. I am following the input before output hypothesis.

The transcripts for the dialogues are awesome for SRSing. They are usually short and concise and often if they are introducing a new grammar point they will limit new words to one or two per line.

No, it's 91.4 mature, 94.1 overall. I think my overall is higher because I will always get my first one right as I have just listened to the podcast plus copy and pasted each sentence.

My deck is about a year old. I started Korean about a year ago with a text book and gave up pretty soon after. I added about 900 cards at that time. When I restarted about 3 months ago, I deleted over 500 cards, most of them i couldn't remember or had grammar which i barely grasped. I have added approximately 1200 cards in the last 3 months and I understand them completely, because I have progressively moved through the kclass 101 levels. I like the idea of picking random cards that interest you, but without an awareness of grammar you get lost (I found). Random picking should be reserved for the intermediate/advanced level. I don't plan to do that until I have pretty much done all the lessons on here.

THIS POST IS GETTING HUGE! Anyway, this is interesting for me to talk about. One thing I think is really good is finding random cards where you understand ALL the words in the sentence, but they are being used in a new or interesting way. Rather than broadening your vocabulary, you are making it deeper, if that makes sense.

Do you think the production cards are important part of your study? I'm also interested in whether you have done much listening to podcasts, music etc so far?

muzioler
New in Town
Posts: 7
Joined: January 21st, 2009 8:10 am
Location: 서울

Postby muzioler » February 19th, 2010 10:48 pm

Its odd, but this is a fun subject for me. I guess spending like 2 full weeks of my life doing Anki has made me a bit attached to it.

The way I base my inputs is pretty easy. If its a new noun, I usually just have it in the middle of a sentence (or by itself depending where I found it). If its a new verb or adjective, I like to have it by itself and then in the middle of a sentence. If its a new grammar concept, I like to have 4-5-6 different sentences showing ways it is being used.

I actually like to use a textbook. I know most people who self-study don't like them (for example, the whole AJATT method), but I really do. Mainly use the Integrated Korean series. Although I am a bit behind on ankiing the grammar, it has helped me out a bit I'd say. I always like when grammar concepts double up... IE I saw it in textbook A and hear it in the podcast or vice-versa. Plus, it gives me something to read and write.

As for whether production is necessary... I oddly have debates about that all the time with myself. I've wanted to switch to recognition only, but I think that it helps me if I try to produce. Plus, I am in Korea right now and I hang around with a lot of Koreans, so I feel as if I practice through Anki it helps me in real life situations. So in conclusion, it helps me now but I'd probably switch over to recognition only for a new language.

Everyone I talk to here tells me Music is the last level... as if you can understand music, then you're gold. Thus, I try to listen only to these Korean podcasts (with a lil Tony Kornheiser to keep my interested). I try to watch the occasional Korean show and I am definitely going to do more of it now-a-days since I need to work on listening. I used to watch "Lets Speak Korean" too, but didn't get enough out of it.

How about you? What do you watch / listen to? Has it helped you? If you live in Korea, do you find that Anki has helped you or do you need other things as well?

Also, whats your opinion on recognition only... have you found any stumbling blocks with it?

imaBALLER
Established Presence
Posts: 77
Joined: November 29th, 2009 8:54 pm

Postby imaBALLER » February 20th, 2010 7:58 am

Our input is pretty similar. When I add a new sentence and it has a new verb in it, I also add the verb as an individual card. With grammar, I add the sentence from the kclass transcript, but then I also go to the grammar section and add whatever examples of the grammar point there I like.

One problem with textbooks is that they take a lot time to input sentences. For ease I like to be able to copy and paste a sentence. Online dictionaries are good for this. I definitely have inputted from a textbook in the past though, and ultimately, if there is an interesting sentence that is teaching you something, it doesn't matter where it comes from.

Recognition only is fine. Over time recognition becomes production for sure. I don't just say this in a theoretical way, I have definitely seen it in my study. The first stage is you can read it, then you can hear it, then you can speak it and lastly you can write it. Sometimes I will find I can say a word, but I can't write it properly, but I don't worry about that because I know eventually when I have read it more, I will write it fine.

This is the thing... you can add production now and maybe get to use it faster, but in the long run it will slow you down, as instead of reviewing new language you are reviewing the same material twice - production and recognition. My 2 cents.

I wonder if those people who said that about music actually speak Korean well? Rap music is ridiculous, and I would totally agree with that, even Korean people struggle to understand some hip hop, but pop music isn't that difficult.

Generally with pop, they sing slower than they speak and they are always saying the same thing. I love you, because of you, It hurts etc... Already at my crappy level I will pick up whole sentences in pop songs.

These days if I am listening to music, it's korean hip hop. I also try and listen to Super Junior's podcast. The podcast is so lively and it sounds like they are having a blast, which makes it really enjoyable for me to listen to. Sometimes I will find myself laughing, not because I understood what was said, but because their laughter is infectious. Also, every kclass podcast dialogue I have learned is in my anki deck, so I get regular exposure to them.

I need to watch more TV and listen to more podcasts though, otherwise I fear it will become an issue for me in the future.

I don't live in Korea, but recently I realised I don't need to be to become really good at Korean. I met up with a Korean girl the other day and was so surprised by how much I understood when she was speaking to me. However, I am still planning to go next year.

muzioler
New in Town
Posts: 7
Joined: January 21st, 2009 8:10 am
Location: 서울

Postby muzioler » February 20th, 2010 1:46 pm

The people who commented about music were actually Koreans who spoke English fluently. Personally, while I do like music I wasn't huge into it even before starting Korean so I prefer to just listen to podcasts. Still, a good Outsider song is nice. I'll definitely add the Super Junior podcast, so thanks for that.

Just to defend the production element, while it has doubled my card load I think it has made it go quicker too. While my mature card level is something like 93%, it is probably closer to 98-99% for recognition alone. That is because production really, really, really reinforces recognition. Honestly, recognition is really the by-product that is kinda like my break.

As for doubling my time... as I mentioned above, it is more like 1.5x. The meeting of the Korean girl... were you able to talk back? In your case I think listening only is fine, but I tend to have to produce language on a daily basis. Oddly, I can talk and talk and talk (not always grammatically correct, but still); however when the person says something back I usually need them to go through it twice.

imaBALLER
Established Presence
Posts: 77
Joined: November 29th, 2009 8:54 pm

Postby imaBALLER » February 21st, 2010 3:56 pm

Ah I could talk back, but it was NOT smooth at all :(

I think if I was in your shoes I would definitely work on production, but at the moment I feel comfortable not doing it.

Yessy89
New in Town
Posts: 4
Joined: February 15th, 2010 11:08 am
Location: Home/School
Contact:

Postby Yessy89 » February 24th, 2010 12:18 pm

Hey,

I've been reading all the posts and this looks like a very intresting program to use. I've never heard of it before but I guess I can try it out. Thanks for the tips! :D

imaBALLER
Established Presence
Posts: 77
Joined: November 29th, 2009 8:54 pm

Postby imaBALLER » February 24th, 2010 3:11 pm

Yessy89, it's great, but not for the faint of heart! If you are serious about learning it is a great tool though!

onji
New in Town
Posts: 4
Joined: August 24th, 2009 11:41 am

Postby onji » March 6th, 2010 6:21 pm

muzioler wrote:
How about you? What do you watch / listen to? Has it helped you? If you live in Korea, do you find that Anki has helped you or do you need other things as well?

Also, whats your opinion on recognition only... have you found any stumbling blocks with it?



I currently live in Korea and i have found Anki to be extremely useful. What I have been doing is using this website and splicing sentences and attaching the audio onto the question side with the hangul and then putting the english or sometimes completely blank on the answer side. Currently my only learning methods are using Anki for the reps, this website, and Sogangs webpage for the grammar. Just by watching and listening to korean music or T.V. at almost all times of the day has helped immensely and it is great when you understand bits and pieces of what they are saying on the tube. I find korean t.v. to be extremely entertaining especially with their gaming channel and their "game show" channel. I focused almost entirely on input and very very little on output.

What I have learned from living here is you need very very little output in the beginning to get by and once you get to a point in your study from the massive amount of input, you will hear someone speak something, understand what they are saying and automatically form a reply sentence in Korean. It is kind of weird how this works but it has been working very well for me.


Return to “Korean Resources & Reviews (자료 및 리뷰)”