Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Tim: 반갑습니다 (Bangapseumnida) KoreanClass101.com 여러분 (yeoreobun). 팀입니다. (Tim imnida.)
Debbie: Debbie here. What’s your point in Korean. In this lesson, you will learn about topic-marking particles (은/는) and subject-marking particles (이/가).
Tim: I have to warn you...this lesson may be a bit difficult for the listeners.
Debbie: Really? Then why do you want to focus on this topic, Tim?
Tim: Because it's a very important part of Korean grammar. Don't worry. I will try to make this lesson as simple as possible.
Debbie: Right. Once you understand this topic, learning Korean will be much easier.
Tim: Okay, Debbie. Are you ready?
Debbie: Bring it on! Let's listen to the conversation!
DIALOGUE
저의 이름은 팀입니다.
저는 미국 사람입니다.
제 친구가 일본사람입니다.
뉴욕에는 한국사람들이 많습니다.
저의 이름은 팀입니다.
저는 미국 사람입니다.
제 친구가 일본사람입니다.
뉴욕에는 한국사람들이 많습니다.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
저의 이름은 팀입니다.
DebbieMy name is Tim.
저는 미국 사람입니다.
DebbieI am American.
제 친구가 일본사람입니다.
DebbieMy friend is Japanese.
뉴욕에는 한국사람들이 많습니다.
DebbieIn New York, there are many Koreans.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Debbie: Hmmm...
Tim: Hmmm...
Debbie: So, what are we supposed to get from the dialogue?
Tim: I don't know. You tell me.
Debbie: "T"..."o"…"pic mar"..."king par."
Tim: Okay. Debbie, forget about the technical terms. Even my parents in Korea don't know about them.
Debbie: Really? That's a relief. Then what do I need to know, Tim?
Tim: All you need to know is this…in Korean, a basic sentence goes like this…A is B.
Debbie: And?
Tim: You need to add particles after the A.
Debbie: And those are...?
Tim: 은/는 and 이/가! That's what we will cover in this lesson.
Debbie: Great! Now let's move on to vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Debbie: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Tim: 이름 [natural native speed]
Debbie: name
Tim: 이름 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 이름 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 많다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: to be many, to be much
Tim: 많다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 많다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 친구 [natural native speed]
Debbie: friend
Tim: 친구 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 친구 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 뉴욕 [natural native speed]
Debbie: New York
Tim: 뉴욕 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 뉴욕 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at some of the words from this lesson.
Tim: First, we're going to look at particles in this lesson, but as I mentioned before, don't worry about those technical terms yet. We are just going to look at which one you need to use based on the sounds.
Debbie: You said that in Korean, the subject of a sentence needs a particle... So what you mean is that just saying the word "I" is not enough in Korean, right?
Tim: Yes! "I" is 저 in Korean, but we shouldn't say 저 by itself. We need something after it. Here is an example. Do you remember the last lesson?
Debbie: Yes, I do.
Tim: Can you introduce yourself in Korean?
Debbie: "I am Debbie" is 저는...데...
Tim: Hold on, Debbie. What did you just say?
Debbie: 저.는... Aha! To say "I" in Korean, we need 저 plus the particle 는!
Tim: Yes! As you can see, we need a particle after it. You are so smart, Debbie!
Debbie: I know! And what are those particles we're going to look at in this lesson again? Okay. Everyone repeat after Tim.
Tim: 은/는 and 이/가.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! What's next?
Tim: Now, this is where the fun starts! Do you know about vowel sounds?
Debbie: Of course!
Tim: What are they?
Debbie: [a], [e], [i], [o], [u]…"–a," "-e," "-i," "-o," "-u!"
Tim: Excellent! If you know those vowels, then this lesson will be a piece of cake.
Debbie: Really? How so, Tim?
Tim: Well, which particle you use in Korean depends on the sound that comes at the end of the word before it. By sound, we mean whether the word ends in a vowel or a consonant.
Debbie: Yes. To sum it up, if a word ends in a vowel, the particles we can attach are...
Tim: 는 or 가.
Debbie: And if the word ends in a consonant, the particles we can attach are...
Tim: 은 or 이.
Debbie: Let's go through some examples so you can get the hang of it.
Tim: Sure! What's "I" in Korean?
Debbie: 저.
Tim: Can you spell out the romanization?
Debbie: 저 is spelled "-j" "-e" "-o"
Tim: And it ends in...?
Debbie: It ends in... 저, "-j" "-e" "-o" with an [o] sound, which is a vowel!
Tim: That's right! Once again, if the word ends in a vowel, then you need to add 는 or 가.
Debbie: Remember, listeners. We are only focusing on which particles you should use based on the sound and not the meaning. That will come later. So let's just focus on learning these rules.
Debbie: So...저 becomes...?
Tim: 저는 or 저가.
Debbie: Can you say it again, Tim?
Tim: 저.는 or 저.가
Debbie: Listeners, please repeat after Tim.
Tim: 저는 or 저가
[pause]
Tim: "I am Tim" 저는 팀 입니다.
[pause]
Tim: 저가 팀 입니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! How about one more example. What is "Friends" in Korean?
Tim: 친.구 - 친구. And can you spell out the Romanization?
Debbie: 친구 is spelled 친 ("chin") and 구 ("gu"), so we have 친구 ("-c" "-h" "-i" "-n" "-g" "-u").
Tim: And it ends in...?
Debbie: It ends in 친구, "chingu" with a [u] sound, which is a vowel!
Tim: Excellent! So you need to add...?
Debbie: 는 or 가?
Tim: Yes! If it ends in a vowel, then you need to add 는 or 가!
Debbie: So 친구 ("friends") finally becomes...
Tim: 친구는 or 친구가.
Debbie: Listeners, please repeat after Tim.
Tim: 친구는 or 친구가.
[pause]
Debbie: What's "My friend is Japanese." in Korean?
Tim: 친구가 일본사람 입니다.
[pause]
Tim: 친구는 일본사람 입니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! On the other hand, if a word ends in a consonant, then...
Tim: You need to add 은 or 이 after the noun.
Debbie: We need an example. What's "name" in Korean?
Tim: 이.름 - 이름. Can you spell out the Romanization?
Debbie: 이름 is spelled 이 ("–i") and 름 ("reum"), which gives us 이름 ("ireum").
Tim: And it ends in...?
Debbie: It ends in 름, "ireum," with an [m] sound…a consonant.
Tim: That's right. Then you need to add 은 or 이.
Debbie: So it becomes...?
Tim: 이름은 or 이름이.
Debbie: Listeners, please repeat after Tim.
Tim: 이름은 or 이름이
[pause]
Debbie: What's "My name is Debbie." in Korean?
Tim: 이름은 데비 입니다.
[pause]
Tim: 이름이 데비 입니다.
[pause]
Debbie: It's getting fun! Now I know how to identify and mark the subject of a Korean sentence! Thanks, Tim! Now let's move on to the lesson focus and practice some more!

Lesson focus

Debbie: The focus of this lesson is whic particles you should use based on the sound that comes at the end of the word. Okay, let's just focus on practicing these rules. Tim, what's "you" in Korean?
Tim: In formal Korean, "you" is 당.신 - 당신. Can you spell it out in Romanization?
Debbie: 당신 is spelled 당 ("-d" "-a" "-n" "-g") and 신 ("-s" "-h" "-i" "-n")…"dangshin."
Tim: And it ends in...?
Debbie: It ends in 당신 ("dangshin") with an [n] sound, which is a consonant.
Tim: So what particles can you add?
Debbie: 은 or 이, and it becomes?
Tim: 당신은 or 당신이.
Debbie: Okay. Listeners, please repeat after Tim.
Tim: 당신은 or 당신이
[pause]
Debbie: What's "you are Japanese." in Korean?
Tim: 당신은 일본사람 입니다.
[pause]
Tim: 당신이 일본사람 입니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! What is "he" in Korean?
Tim: 그 - 그. What's the romanization?
Debbie: 그 is spelled "-g" "-e" "-u," and it ends in a [u] sound, which is a vowel.
Tim: And...?
Debbie: I add 는 or 가, so it becomes 그는 or 그가
Tim: Fantastic, Debbie!
Debbie: Okay. We'll do this last one with the listeners. Tim and I will give you a hint and you guys can figure out which particle to attach to the word. Are you ready? Here it is! What's "they" in Korean, Tim?
Tim: 그.들 - 그들. When you spell out the Romanization, it's...
Debbie: 그 is "-g" "-e" "-u," and 들 is "-d" "-e" "-u" "-l," so we have 그들, "geudeul." And listeners, what does the word end in?
[pause]
Tim: It ends in an [l] sound…a consonant. So, if it ends in a consonant, then what do you add?
[pause]
Debbie: We need to add 은 or 이 and it finally becomes... Listeners, please repeat after Tim.
Tim: 그들은 or 그들이
Debbie: What's "They are American." in Korean?
Tim: 그들은 미국사람 입니다.
[pause]
Tim: 그들이 미국사람 입니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Wow! Great job, you guys! We are so impressed! Aren't you Tim?
Tim: ...
Debbie: Tim?
Tim: Sorry. I'm just...speechless!
Debbie: Ha ha…

Outro

Debbie: Okay. That's all for this lesson. Okay, see you next time!
Tim: 그럼 다음 시간까지 안녕~~!

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