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인사 할게요.

Learn more about the community and how they are learning Korean and about Korean. Do a little listener-to-listener chit chat. Keep it civil, and everything else goes.
SiEd
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인사 할게요.

Postby SiEd » July 5th, 2008 3:44 am

안녕하세요 여러분,

Where to begin??

I've been at the forums for a couple of weeks now, but I think I should fully de-lurk and introduce myself. My name's Ed, and I am currently a PhD student of linguistics. I'm actually fluent in Indonesian and investigating Balinese for my dissertation. That's why I integrate Balinese into some of my posts - sorry ;)

I took one year of Korean a couple of years ago, in preparation for a linguistics conference at Yonsei University the following summer. And it was a good thing, too - I stayed at a good friend's place, and her parents did not speak any English at all, so I was thrown into the deep end with only one-year's worth of Korean language instruction, so to speak. But it was great - lots of good memories.

What got me interested in things Korean though is interesting: A PBS special (about 15 years ago, I think) where deaf Scottish percussionist Dame Evelyn Glennie goes to South Korea to experience Korean percussion such as 사물놀이, 풍물, and so on. She finally goes to 진도 and visits the proponents of 씻김굿, an exorcism rite that is a 진도 specialty. I was awestruck. I have yet to witness the rite, but it is one of my goals. (Does anyone else remember this program?)

As for myself, I've been a performer of Central Javanese and Balinese gamelan (percussion) and dance for over 15 years - I still see myself on Balinese television when the group I was participating in at the time did a tour over there and a television crew was there to film one of our concerts. That's a weird experience, as the footage is from eight years ago! Anyhow, since I am a percussion nut, I couldn't resist buying a 장구 and 꽹과리 when I was in Korea ㅋㅋㅋ.

I love hot and spicy food (both eating a preparing), so Korean cuisine is right up there (I even have a couple of cookbooks in Korean - I'm trying to improve my cooking vocab).

Also, learning Korean, specifically the uses of 존댓말 vs. 반말, actually helped me a lot in understanding speech level usage in languages where the systems are much more complex, like in Balinese and Javanese. It's just that the Korean system is much more transparent, I think. For example, to say "Are you going now?" in Korean (please correct me if I'm wrong):

존댓말: 지금 가요?/지금 가세요?/지금 갑니까?/지금 가십니까?
반말: 지금 가?

In comparison, to say this in Balinese:

High Balinese (to high-caste members): Iratu budal mangkin? [You going now?]
Middle Balinese (to strangers): Jero lunga mangkin? [You going now?]
Low Balinese (to intimates, lower caste members): Cai luas jani? [You going now?]

Yep, you have to learn three different sets of vocabulary for this speech level system...

반갑습니다! Okay, I'll be quiet now. ;)
"I'm trying to make a pun, but it's not punny."
-Mas Widiyanto

matthew254
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Postby matthew254 » July 5th, 2008 4:34 am

SiEd, welcome welcome! What do mean - you'll shut up now? Your insight is valuable. I was wondering who was throwing Balinese into the posts - how intriguing! I'm glad that you're contributing. We all hope to see and hear more of you.

Although I am nowhere near as dedicated to linguistics as you are, I am an ESL and special education major (a lowly undergraduate) so I can appreciate your interest. My linguistics classes were fascinating.

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maxiewawa
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Postby maxiewawa » July 5th, 2008 11:19 am

Welcome! I'm sure Hyunwoo will be interested to meet you. He's hard working on his Indonesian.

I had always assumed that they spoke Indonesian on Bali.

SiEd
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Joined: June 18th, 2008 2:51 am

Postby SiEd » July 5th, 2008 11:36 am

maxiewawa wrote:Welcome! I'm sure Hyunwoo will be interested to meet you. He's hard working on his Indonesian.

I had always assumed that they spoke Indonesian on Bali.


I've actually been coaching Hyunwoo ever since he first posted his "learning Indonesian" blog entry on his site. I've sent him lots of suggestions, and we made a recording a couple of days ago - should be up soon.

Yeah, Indonesian's the national language, but most people are at least bilingual, i.e. Indonesian plus their regional language(s). Most Balinese surpass this - because of the tourist industry, many Balinese also speak a third or even a fourth language, which may include English, Japanese, German, French, and even a little Korean (mainly due to the influence of the K-drama "What Happened in Bali". FWIW, the interpreter for the Korean tourists on the show spoke HORRIBLE Indonesian - I couldn't make heads or tails out of what she said.)
"I'm trying to make a pun, but it's not punny."

-Mas Widiyanto

shanshanchua
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Postby shanshanchua » July 5th, 2008 3:43 pm

Ed, where do you live? In the States? Or in Korea?

It's interesting when there's someone who's Asian or familiar with Asia. I'm in Singapore, fairly near to Indonesia. Although I haven't been to Bali, I've been to Bintan many times. I would love to go to Bali though! :)

SiEd
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Postby SiEd » July 5th, 2008 3:49 pm

shanshanchua wrote:Ed, where do you live? In the States? Or in Korea?

It's interesting when there's someone who's Asian or familiar with Asia. I'm in Singapore, fairly near to Indonesia. Although I haven't been to Bali, I've been to Bintan many times. I would love to go to Bali though! :)


미국에서 태어났고 살아요.
"I'm trying to make a pun, but it's not punny."

-Mas Widiyanto

SiEd
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Postby SiEd » July 5th, 2008 3:51 pm

SiEd wrote: FWIW, the interpreter for the Korean tourists on the show spoke HORRIBLE Indonesian - I couldn't make heads or tails out of what she said.)


In fact, I had to look at the Korean subtitles to figure out what was she was saying - how ironic!!
"I'm trying to make a pun, but it's not punny."

-Mas Widiyanto

SiEd
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Joined: June 18th, 2008 2:51 am

Re: 인사 할게요.

Postby SiEd » July 11th, 2008 9:51 am

SiEd wrote:
As for myself, I've been a performer of Central Javanese and Balinese gamelan (percussion) and dance for over 15 years



Just a sample of my music-making:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCRGEu7UsJU
"I'm trying to make a pun, but it's not punny."

-Mas Widiyanto

javiskefka
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Postby javiskefka » July 12th, 2008 3:52 pm

That was great. I have a question about the dance though. Traditionally who would be sitting in the middle and front, watching the performance from the center of it all?

SiEd
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Postby SiEd » July 13th, 2008 12:03 am

javiskefka wrote:That was great. I have a question about the dance though. Traditionally who would be sitting in the middle and front, watching the performance from the center of it all?


Usually this dance would be held in one of the main open multi-pillared pavilions (called pendhapa in Javanese) in the palace, so the audience would be sitting along the side and front borders of the pavilion. As far as I know, invited guests (i.e. other people having titles granted by the palace and other dignitaries) have front row priorities, but nowadays I think anybody is welcome to attend as long as you're in traditional dress.

Another thing - not too long ago did they stop the use of actual weaponry in this dance (and related dances). I would hear stories from my teachers about how some dancers would be seriously injured from some mishaps that occurred during the performances.
"I'm trying to make a pun, but it's not punny."

-Mas Widiyanto

SiEd
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Posts: 117
Joined: June 18th, 2008 2:51 am

Postby SiEd » July 13th, 2008 3:13 pm

javiskefka wrote:That was great. I have a question about the dance though. Traditionally who would be sitting in the middle and front, watching the performance from the center of it all?


Or do you mean the people who are actually sitting in front of the orchestra? Those are the gerong and sindhen (male chorus and female singers).
"I'm trying to make a pun, but it's not punny."

-Mas Widiyanto


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