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"no problem"

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matthew254
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"no problem"

Postby matthew254 » October 26th, 2008 4:36 pm

two questions.

1) I generally use 괜찮아요 or 문제없어요 - although some of my friends have told me that "문제없어요" isn't very natural sounding. I sometimes feel that I overuse 괜찮아 so I'm trying to branch out and expand my vernacular if possible. Any insight?

2) Also, I heard on a kdrama something that was translated to "no problem" and it sounded like "한불인이죠" but I can't tell exactly what is being said. The context was someone asked a guy a favor - if he could hold onto something and give it to a coworker later. the guy responded with "네," and then the phrase. Can anyone shed some light on this?

yhenry
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Re: "no problem"

Postby yhenry » October 28th, 2008 1:58 am

matthew254 wrote:two questions.

1) I generally use 괜찮아요 or 문제없어요 - although some of my friends have told me that "문제없어요" isn't very natural sounding. I sometimes feel that I overuse 괜찮아 so I'm trying to branch out and expand my vernacular if possible. Any insight?

2) Also, I heard on a kdrama something that was translated to "no problem" and it sounded like "한불인이죠" but I can't tell exactly what is being said. The context was someone asked a guy a favor - if he could hold onto something and give it to a coworker later. the guy responded with "네," and then the phrase. Can anyone shed some light on this?


Hi, Matthew.
I didn't know my friend is hiding in this far south religion of the main forum page I happened to open to see what is up down there.

괜찮아요 basically can be used in place of 'that is okay', while 문제없어요 can be used in a situation that you can handle without much effort or difficulty.

많이 아파? 약 사줄까? 괞찬아요, 됏어요, 별로요(not so much), 사줄래요?

도와줄까? 괞찬아요, 좋음니다 (fine) 환영이요(welcome) 말씀 고맙지만 사양합니다 (thank but no thank) 지당하십니다 (you are more than right. being funny, too) 받아도 될까요? 부담되네요, 찜찜합니다만, 원하신다면, 그러실래요? 쬐끔만 해주세요, 공짜요? (free of charge?)

섭섭하니? 괞찬아요, 맞아요, 참아야지요, 조금은 그렇죠, 많이요, 가슴이 저리내요, 울고 싶네요 말로 할 수 없네요(no word can describe) 몰라서 물어요?(rude but straight forward)

힘드니? 괞찬아요, 맞아요, 참아야지요, 조금은 그렇죠, 많이요, 땀나게 힘드네요, 어쩌겠어요 (no choice)

잘 할 수 있니?
문제없어요, 그러문요(of course), 못하면 바보지요, 잘 하다마다요 (more than good) 자신 있어요/없어요, 해봐야지요(must try and see)

어려울텐데...
문제없어요, 식은죽 먹기요 (literally eating a cold soup, meaning piece of cake.) 내 사전에 불가능은 없읍니다, 할 수 있음니다 두고 보시오(wait and see) 해낼겁니다.

As for 한불인이죠, forget it. (I don't even know. So, what is the sense to learn and use it when you have to explain what it means to Koreans who are not familiar with such a expression?)
I myself need to know the whole context to even guess what it means.

Use your time studying those phrases used anytime and place of daily life.
I am a forever ESL student.

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manyakumi
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Re: "no problem"

Postby manyakumi » October 28th, 2008 10:16 am

Hi, Matthew and yhenry. :)
It's been a while I come and leave a comment.
Let me give you some corrections for you if you don't mind.

yhenry wrote: 많이 아파? 약 사줄까? 괞찬아요, 됏어요, 별로요(not so much), 사줄래요?

도와줄까? 괞찬아요, 좋음니다 (fine) 환영이요(welcome) 말씀 고맙지만 사양합니다 (thank but no thank) 지당하십니다 (you are more than right. being funny, too) 받아도 될까요? 부담되네요, 찜찜합니다만, 원하신다면, 그러실래요? 쬐끔만 해주세요, 공짜요? (free of charge?)

괞찬아요 -> 괜찮아요
됏어요 -> 됐어요
좋음니다 -> 좋습니다
쬐끔만 -> 쬐금만 or 조금만

These spelling things are confused even for native Koreans. ;)

And 지당하십니다 can't be used for above situation.
It would be used when someone much older than you gives you an advice and you can say it for the meaning of agreement. And in that case, it wouldn't be funny at all.

matthew254 wrote: 2) Also, I heard on a kdrama something that was translated to "no problem" and it sounded like "한불인이죠" but I can't tell exactly what is being said. The context was someone asked a guy a favor - if he could hold onto something and give it to a coworker later. the guy responded with "네," and then the phrase. Can anyone shed some light on this?

I guess it might be 아, 물론이죠 or 아무렴이요
If not, it must be another words in the specific context not only common agreement.

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Postby matthew254 » October 28th, 2008 11:41 am

thanks for the detailed responses guys! as far as the context - since I haven't heard the response before, I agree with henry - I suppose I shouldn't focus too much on it. I have plenty else to be focusing on :)

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Re: "no problem"

Postby yhenry » October 28th, 2008 10:55 pm

manyakumi wrote:괞찬아요 -> 괜찮아요
됏어요 -> 됐어요
좋음니다 -> 좋습니다
쬐끔만 -> 쬐금만 or 조금만

These spelling things are confused even for native Koreans. ;)


To tell you the truth, I don't have to study grammar to speak Korean, meaning that I might have to learn it from you.XD
However, I might know English grammar or grammatical termㄴ more than you.hehe
Thank you for the correction.

And 지당하십니다 can't be used for above situation.
It would be used when someone much older than you gives you an advice and you can say it for the meaning of agreement. And in that case, it wouldn't be funny at all.


지당하신 말씀이고 지적입니다. 한가지 지당하옵지 아니하신 점은 '지당하시다'라는 표현이 현대에는 지당치 않은 표현이기에, like a King James word, 좀 웃긴다고 말씀 올린 것뿐이옵지요. 황 송 하 옵 니 다, 대감님.XD

현우씨 한테 물어 봐요
I am a forever ESL student.

manyakumi
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Re: "no problem"

Postby manyakumi » October 29th, 2008 10:05 am

yhenry wrote:한가지 지당하옵지 아니하신 점은 '지당하시다'라는 표현이 현대에는 지당치 않은 표현이기에, like a King James word, 좀 웃긴다고 말씀 올린 것뿐이옵지요.


Had you gone to america in the age of Chosun Dynasty? lol
For giving you lately information, It's still used by modern people here in Korea.

Although I'm not good at English very well,
I'm trying to write in English while you seem to be more comfortable with English than Korean. :wink:

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Postby Chris1 » November 6th, 2008 2:32 am

I believe yhenry is trying to say that using that contruction in the correct situation can give a sense of comic relief since the word is so old. Words like "splendid" and "swell" are older-generational words in the US, and using them in the right situations can be comical just because they are outdated.

For all intents and purposes, however, it's probably best to spare these types of expressions to non-native speakers to avoid confusion.

yhenry
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Postby yhenry » November 6th, 2008 7:25 am

Chris1 wrote:I believe yhenry is trying to say that using that contruction in the correct situation can give a sense of comic relief since the word is so old. Words like "splendid" and "swell" are older-generational words in the US, and using them in the right situations can be comical just because they are outdated.

For all intents and purposes, however, it's probably best to spare these types of expressions to non-native speakers to avoid confusion.


I thought that 지당합니다 is like the King James word because the word was used by my generation, one generation older than the new generation.
I didn't know it is still used by the new generation which created many new words I feel foreign with.

Thank you for getting my poor sense of humor.

PS, I have read your writing in Korean, and simply awe-stricken, speechless, even jealous. Get back to you soon.
I am a forever ESL student.

manyakumi
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Postby manyakumi » November 6th, 2008 5:36 pm

Of course I understood what yhenry was trying to say.
I just wanted to say that 지당하다 is not that kind of word.
It's just a contracted word of 지극히 당연하다.
We might get some old nuance from it however still use often in daily lives.
I mean it is not a King James word as he thoughts.

:wink:


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