Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Seol: 안녕하세요. 윤설입니다.
Keith: Keith here. Newbie Lesson #7. I Am Hungry!
Seol: You are really hungry, aren’t you?
Keith: Me? No I just had something to eat. Seol, are you hungry?
Seol: 네, 배고파요.
Keith: Oh wait! We didn’t go over the lesson yet. All right, well what are you in the mood for?
Seol: Pizza.
Keith: I thought you were Korean, come on!
Seol: Then 김치찌개.
Keith: Well you are just making that up.
Seol: No I really feel like 김치찌개 now.
Keith: No, you just said pizza?
Seol: Just it came out.
Keith: Are you really Korean?
Seol: I am Korean.
Keith: Yeah. Korean people, they are always talking about, man, I miss Korean food, I miss Korean food, I miss Korean food when they are outside of Korea of course. Seol, you studied abroad in Edmonton, right?
Seol: Right.
Keith: And how long were you there?
Seol: 5 months.
Keith: So for 5 months, every day were you like man, I want to eat some kimchi, kimchi.
Seol: I did, I did, I really did.
Keith: Yeah, always kimchi though, right?
Seol: Right, right.
Keith: Yeah well me too, I want to eat some kimchi right now actually but all right anyway, yeah today we have a lesson not on food but umm Seol actually can you explain to us what today’s lesson is about?
Seol: 수희 and 용준 are talking about being hungry.
Keith: Yeah real simple, right?
Seol: Right.
Keith: All right, well they are probably friends or they know each other to some degree because they are using standard politeness level. All right, so let’s get into the conversation.
DIALOGUE
(1)수희: 아.. 배고파요. 용준 씨는요?
(2)용준: 저는 배불러요. 수희 씨는 많이 배고파요?
(3)수희: 네. 많이 배고파요. 용준 씨는 많이 배불러요?
(4)용준: 네. 많이 배불러요.
Seol: 한 번 더 천천히.
(1)수희: 아.. 배고파요. 용준 씨는요?
(2)용준: 저는 배불러요. 수희 씨는 많이 배고파요?
(3)수희: 네. 많이 배고파요. 용준 씨는 많이 배불러요?
(4)용준: 네. 많이 배불러요.
Seol: 영어로 한 번 더.
(1)수희: 아.. 배고파요. 용준 씨는요?
(1)Suhui: I’m hungry. What about you, Yongjun?
(2)용준: 저는 배불러요. 수희 씨는 많이 배고파요?
(2)Yongjun: I’m very full. Suhui, are you really hungry?
(3)수희: 네. 많이 배고파요. 용준 씨는 많이 배불러요?
(3)Suhui: Yes I’m very hungry. Yongjun, are you very full?
(4)용준: 네. 많이 배불러요.
(4)Yongjun: Yes, I’m very full.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Keith: All right, so what did you think of the conversation?
Seol: Well I feel sorry for her and I am hungry too.
Keith: 배고파요?
Seol: 네. 많이 배고파요.
Keith: Whoa! Well this is some vocabulary that maybe some of our listeners don’t know yet. So how about that? Let’s go into the vocabulary. All right, first we have
VOCAB LIST
Seol: 배고파요.
Keith: Hungry.
Seol: 배고파요 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 배고파요 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next we have
Seol: 배불러요.
Keith: Full.
Seol: 배불러요 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 배불러요 [natural native speed]
Keith: Now these two are really similar hah! It’s just one change in the middle. So Seol can you give us both side by side? I am hungry.
Seol: 배고파요.
Keith: I am full.
Seol: 배불러요.
Keith: Yeah almost the same, really close. All right, last we have a very, very useful word and that is
Seol: 많이.
Keith: A lot or very.
Seol: 많이 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 많이 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right. Let’s take a deeper look into this conversation. First we have
Seol: 아.. 배고파요.
Keith: What’s our first syllable 아?
Seol: Because she is hungry, now she sounded like that.
Keith: So maybe her stomach hurts, that’s what it is because I use it sometimes like if my friend hits me, it’s like ah!
Seol: Yeah.
Keith: So it’s a sound that you make when you are hungry or when you are hurting or it’s just a sound. And this is kind of like a moan like ah I am hungry! All right, and that’s exactly what comes next.
Seol: 배고파요.
Keith: I am hungry. All right and this is a great phrase that you can use anytime, anywhere with a bunch of Koreans. Now, Seol, you have a lot of non-Korean friends, right?
Seol: Right.
Keith: So your non-Korean friends and you think they don’t speak any Korean and all of a sudden, they say 아.. 설 배고파요.
Seol: I would be really surprised and impressed.
Keith: Yeah this is a really great phrase to use if you are going to be around Koreans and you are going to be eating of course with your friends where everybody eats. So you can say 아.. 배고파요. Do they have to do the 아..
Seol: No, no.
Keith: No okay that’s not necessary but yeah this is a really cool phrase that you can use with your friends. All right and next we have
Seol: 용준 씨는요?
Keith: And we covered this in our last lesson. So we have 용준’s name with the honorific suffix that’s
Seol: 용준 씨.
Keith: And then we follow this up with 는요 and this means how about you. All right, let’s move on. Next we have 저는 배불러요. Seol, can you break it down for us?
Seol: 저
Keith: I followed by
Seol: 는
Keith: The topic marking particle and after that we have
Seol: 배불러요.
Keith: Full. So here it’s, I am full. Once again the pronunciation between hungry and full, they are very similar. So be careful which one you use. Seol, what’s I am hungry again?
Seol: 배고파요.
Keith: Right and the literal meaning behind this, Seol, what is the literal meaning?
Seol: My stomach needs something. My stomach wants something.
Keith: Yeah but umm once again, we are not going to break this down for you but yeah, this is kind of like a cool and funny thing to know, it’s like my stomach needs something and don’t all of our stomachs need something. Here we have 배불러요 and what’s the literal meaning behind this?
Seol: Well my stomach is expanded maybe.
Keith: My stomach is full, expanded.
Seol: Yeah.
Keith: Yeah just kind of exploding.
Seol: Well I’ve never broken up these words. So I am not sure about it but yeah maybe my stomach is full, my stomach is expanded.
Keith: Yeah once again, we are not going to go into the grammar of this. You can break it down a little bit but not today because today is newbie series. All right, so my stomach needs something and my stomach is expanded or my stomach is full, very interesting ways to say I am hungry. Ah Seol my stomach needs something. All right well let’s move on. Next we have 수희씨는 많이 배고파요? First we have
Seol: 수희
Keith: 수희 followed by
Seol: 씨
Keith: The honorific suffix and then
Seol: 는
Keith: The topic marking particle. After that, we have
Seol: 많이
Keith: This means a lot or very. And lastly, we have
Seol: 배고파요?
Keith: This is hungry again but here it has a rising intonation. So here it’s a question 배고파요? and the statement is
Seol: 배고파요.
Keith: Seol, can you give us the question of I am full and the statement of I am full. First the question
Seol: 배불러요?
Keith: And now the statement
Seol: 배불러요.
Keith: Same words, same pronunciations, different intonation. All right let’s go back to that word 많이. This word can be put in front of a lot of adjectives. So 많이 배고파요 I am very hungry 많이 배불러요 I am very full. So you can use this with a lot of descriptive verbs or adjectives. Seol, can you give us a couple of examples?
Seol: 많이 추워요.
Keith: I am very cold. These words haven’t come out yet in the newbie series but we are just giving you examples on how to use 많이. Okay what’s another example?
Seol: 많이 더워요.
Keith: It’s very hot or I am very hot. Can you give us one more?
Seol: 많이 예뻐요.
Keith: Very pretty. Kind of like you, Seol.
Seol: Thank you.
Keith: All right. Well, so here you can use 많이 and then if you know a couple of adjectives yourself, you can just add them on to the end. So 많이 and then an adjective. This is very useful and we are going to be using it all the time throughout this newbie series, beginner lessons, intermediate series, you are going to be hearing it all the time. So remember it. Next we have
Seol: 네. 많이 배고파요.
Keith: Let’s break it down real quick. First is
Seol: 네.
Keith: Yes followed by
Seol: 많이
Keith: A lot or very.
Seol: 배고파요.
Keith: Hungry. So Seol, 많이 배고파요?
Seol: 네. 많이 배고파요.
Keith: Do you want me to buy you some dinner?
Seol: No, I am fine.
Keith: No?
Seol: No.
Keith: All right and next we have
Seol: 용준 씨는 많이 배불러요?
Keith: Are you very full? Last we have
Seol: 네. 많이 배불러요.
Keith: First we have
Seol: 네.
Keith: Yes followed by
Seol: 많이
Keith: A lot and then
Seol: 배불러요.
Keith: Full. So literally yes a lot full and here altogether it means yes, I am very full. All right, how do you feel after doing this lesson, Seol?
Seol: From the beginning, I felt hungry but now, you never imagine how hungry I am.
Keith: Can you eat a horse?
Seol: Probably.
Keith: A whole horse?
Seol: Maybe a part of horse.
Keith: Now that’s a saying we have in English like ah I am so hungry, I can eat a horse but no, no horses for you?
Seol: No.
OUTRO
Keith: All right well, that’s going to do it for today. Remember to stop by KoreanClass101.com. There we have the accompanying PDF and the learning center where it will bring everything together. Be sure to stop by and check it out.
Seol: 안녕.
Keith: See you.

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108 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
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KoreanClass101.com
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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여러분... Korean people always say "There's always room for rice." Even if they get as full as possible, they can always eat a little rice. Is this true with you?

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Thursday at 1:45 am
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Hi ilyza,


안녕하세요!

공부 열심히 하세요~


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

ilyza
Monday at 5:34 pm
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annyeonghasayo

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 12:57 am
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Hi Eleanor,


Thanks for posting. To answer your question, 수희 was referring to herself, so she omitted 'I'. However, 용준 was answering a question and his answer was contradictory(as he was full), so he had to answer with 저는. If he were agreeing and saying he was hungry, he would have said 'I am also', which would use the particle 도 (저도 배고파요).


Hope this was of help!

Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Eleanor
Sunday at 9:21 pm
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Sorry, in my previous comment i meant (baegopayo) not (baegopeuda).

Eleanor
Saturday at 8:14 pm
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I noticed that when Suhui said (baegopeuda) she didn't use (jeo-neun),

but Yongjun did when he said (baebulleoyo) - does it matter if you use 'I' or does it differ in context?


Many Thanks,

Eleanor

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Thursday at 10:30 am
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Hello Melissa,


Thank you for your kind feedback! We are glad that we could help and we wish you good luck!

Let us know if you have any question.


Cheers,

Stan

Team KoreanClass101.com

Melissa
Wednesday at 5:31 am
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Good day everyone!


These lessons are super well made. My progression is steady and the contents are easily understandable and are a great way to learn Korean Online. Bravo to the team! This is wonderful. I am very impressed. :)

koreanClass101.comVerified
Wednesday at 10:00 pm
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Hi Ian,


Thanks for commenting. Not sure where exactly Seol studied, but if it was the UK, interesting to know that you two would have been in close proximity of each other! :smile:


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Ian
Tuesday at 11:37 pm
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If Keith was referring to Edmonton, UK. Seol wasn't far away from me whilst she was studying. :smile:

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Tuesday at 11:03 am
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Hey 필립,


Thanks for your post. They are all words used for emphasis, but have slightly different meanings.

많이--->a lot, much

아주--->quite, very

참---->really, truly


Hope this was of help.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com