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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Debbie: Hello, and welcome back to the KoreanPOD101.com , the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Korean! I'm joined in the studio by...
Tim: Hello everyone. Tim here.
Tim: Hello, everyone! Welcome back to KoreanClass101.com.
Debbie: With us, you'll learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Debbie: Hey Tim?
Tim: What?
Debbie: Can you come here for a second?
Tim: Okay...
Debbie: (sound of 꽝 a smash)
Tim: 아! 아야!
Debbie: "Are you all right, Tim?"
Tim: Why did you do that for?
Debbie: I'm sorry. (미안해하면서) I did that on purpose, so I could ask you, 'Are you all right?' That's what we're going to learn to say today.
Tim: Ah...I see. Well can you come over here for a second?
Debbie: Nope! Not falling for it! Why don't you tell us where this conversation takes place?
Tim: On the phone - 전화에서.
Debbie: The conversation is between...
Tim: Tim and Sujin.
Debbie: Since the conversation is between friends, the speakers will speak using informal Korean.
Tim: 반말 입니다.
Debbie: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
(전화 통화 중)
(전화 통화 중)
팀: 여보세요...
수진: 팀, 나 수진이야. 좀 괜찮아?
팀: 아니... 온몸이 쑤시네...
수진: 머리는 어때?
수진: 배는 괜찮아? 팔은? 다리는?
팀: 수진, 나 괜찮아... 걱정마!
수진: 알았어. 그럼 푹 쉬어.
팀: 응. 고마워~~
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
팀: 여보세요...
수진: 팀, 나 수진이야. 좀 괜찮아?
팀: 아니... 온몸이 쑤시네...
수진: 머리는 어때?
수진: 배는 괜찮아? 팔은? 다리는?
팀: 수진, 나 괜찮아... 걱정마!
수진: 알았어. 그럼 푹 쉬어.
팀: 응. 고마워~~
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
(전화 통화 중)
Debbie(on the telephone)
팀: 여보세요...
Debbie: Hello...
수진: 팀, 나 수진이야. 좀 괜찮아?
Debbie: Tim, this is Sujin. Are you all right?
팀: 아니... 온몸이 쑤시네...
Debbie: No...My entire body aches...
수진: 머리는 어때?
Debbie: How's your head?
수진: 배는 괜찮아? 팔은? 다리는?
Debbie: Is your stomach okay? How about your arms? How about your legs?
팀: 수진, 나 괜찮아... 걱정마!
Debbie: Sujin, I'm okay...Don't worry!
수진: 알았어. 그럼 푹 쉬어.
Debbie: Okay. Then get a lot of rest.
팀: 응. 고마워~~
Debbie: Okay. Thanks...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Debbie: I feel sorry for Tim...Not you, but Tim from the conversation we just heard. I think he got a cold...
Tim: I think so, too...
Debbie: Tim, when people catch a cold in Korea, what would they normally do?
Tim: Go to the hospital.
Debbie: And...?
Tim: See a doctor and get an examination.
Debbie: And...?
Tim: Well, if you want hear a conversation that takes place at a hospital, please listen to the next lesson - lesson 23.
Debbie: Aw, so that means... Tim is going to the hospital in the next lesson?
Tim: Unfortunately, yes.
Debbie: Poor Tim. (강조) Is Tim all right?
Tim: I think he'll get better after lesson 23. 하하
Debbie: By the way, how do you say, "get a lot of rest" in Korean?
Tim: Ah...you can say, "잘 쉬어".
Debbie: Can you say it again?
Tim: 잘 쉬어. The shortened form is 잘셔.
Debbie: Great! Let's take a look at today's key vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Debbie: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Tim: 여보세요 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Hello? (used on the phone)
Tim: 여보세요 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 여보세요 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 좀 [natural native speed]
Debbie: a bit, a little
Tim: 좀 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 좀 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 괜찮아 [natural native speed]
Debbie: It's okay.
Tim: 괜찮아 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 괜찮아 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 온몸 [natural native speed]
Debbie: whole body
Tim: 온몸 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 온몸 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 쑤시다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: to ache, to be sore
Tim: 쑤시다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 쑤시다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 머리 [natural native speed]
Debbie: head
Tim: 머리 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 머리 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 어때 [natural native speed]
Debbie: how about
Tim: 어때 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 어때 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 배 [natural native speed]
Debbie: stomach, belly
Tim: 배 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 배 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 팔 [natural native speed]
Debbie: arm
Tim: 팔 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 팔 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 다리 [natural native speed]
Debbie: leg
Tim: 다리 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 다리 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 걱정마. [natural native speed]
Debbie: Don't worry.
Tim: 걱정마. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 걱정마. [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 알았어 [natural native speed]
Debbie: I got it. I understand. (intimate)
Tim: 알았어 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 알았어 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 푹 [natural native speed]
Debbie: deeply, completely, soundly
Tim: 푹 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 푹 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 쉬다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: to take a rest, to take a break
Tim: 쉬다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 쉬다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 고마워. [natural native speed]
Debbie: Thanks. (intimate)
Tim: 고마워. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 고마워. [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Tim: 머.리 - 머리.
Debbie: Meaning "head".
Tim: Yes. 머리 literally means "head". But, it can also be used when you have a headache or to say that someone is smart.
Debbie: Hmmm...So Tim, if I want to say, "I have a headache" in Korean...
Tim: That would be, "머.리.가. 아.파 - 머리가 아파" Please repeat after me, "I have a headache" - 머리가 아파.
[pause]
Debbie: How about... "You are smart"?
Tim: 너.는. 머.리.가. 좋.아 - 너는 머리가 좋아.
Debbie: Tim, 너는 머리가 좋아, "Tim, you are smart" 하하
Tim: Thanks, Debbie. Debbie, 너는 머리가 아파, "Debbie, you have a headache".
Debbie: What?! 하하 I thought you were going to give me a compliment...
Tim: Just joking.
Debbie: The next word is...
Tim: 배 - 배
Debbie: Meaning "belly or stomach". For example...Hmm..in the last lesson, "Three bears", we learned that "Papa bear is fat, fat, fat!"
Tim: 아~~ right. Listeners, do you remember? 아빠곰은 뚱뚱해. 하하
Debbie: How about.. "Tim's belly is fat, fat, fat!"?
Tim: 하하 Good one! nice example! In Absolute Beginner Season 2 Lesson 6, we learned about 'Possessive Nouns', so 'Tim's' becomes 팀의.
Debbie: And today we've just learned about "belly" - 배. so, "Tim's belly" is 팀.의. 배 - 팀의 배.
Tim: And we learned about "fat, fat, fat" - 뚱뚱해. So 'Tim's belly is fat, fat, fat" is...?
Debbie: (노래 흥으로 singing) 팀의 배는 뚱뚱해! 하하
Tim: 하하! I love it!
Debbie: Next we have,
Tim: 팔 - 팔
Debbie: Meaning "arms" and last we have...
Tim: 다.리 - 다리
Debbie: Meaning "legs". How do you say, "arms and legs" in Korean, Tim?
Tim: Listeners, we learned how to say "A and B" in Korean in Lesson 7, remember?
Debbie: I'm sure they do. Listeners, please repeat after Tim. "Arms (강조) and legs".
Tim: 팔 "과" 다리
[pause]
Debbie: Excellent! Now let's move on the the lesson focus!

Lesson focus

Debbie: The focus of this lesson is how to inquire about someone's physical condition by asking, 괜찮아? "Are you all right?"
Tim: Listeners, please repeat after me. 괜.찮.아? - 괜찮아?
[pause]
Debbie: 괜찮아 is a very common expression used to ask if someone feels okay or not.
Tim: You can also add 좀, which means "some, a little, a few" before 괜찮아. This makes it sound more natural.
Debbie: For example...?
Tim: 데비, 좀 괜찮아? "Debbie, are you all right?"
Debbie: Tim, that would be my question to you! Remember how I hit you earlier?
Tim: Right! 어디였더라 "Where was it?"
Debbie: 팀, 머리 좀 괜찮아 (intonation UP)? "Tim, is your head all right?"
Tim: 응, 괜찮아 (intonation DOWN). "Yes, I am all right."
Debbie: Did you guys notice our intonation? If it goes up like 괜찮아? (억양을 올리며 tone is up), it means you are asking about someone's physical condition, like 팀 괜찮아?
Tim: If the intonation goes down like 괜찮아 (억양이 떨어지며 tone is down), it means "I feel all right". We should keep practicing.
Debbie: Okay. I'll go first. 팀, 머리 좀 괜찮아? (Intonation UP) "Tim, is your head all right?"
Tim: 응, 괜찮아 (intonation DOWN) "Yes, I am all right."
Debbie: Listeners, please repeat after Tim, "are you all right?"
Tim: 좀 괜찮아? (intonation UP)
[pause]
Debbie: This time, "I am all right."
Tim: 괜찮아 (intonation DOWN)
[pause]
Debbie: Great! Tim, I have a question...
Tim: Sure!
Debbie: In Lesson 5, we learned about a similar expression , 어때? "how is / how about?"
Tim: WOW! I am very glad you asked! 짝짝짝! Okay! Let's review and practice together! Do you remember how to say stomach?
Debbie: Of course! (웃으면서 노래를...) 팀의 배는 뚱뚱해~~ "Stomach" is 배.
Tim: 하하 Good~! How about... "How is your stomach?"
Debbie: 배.는. 어.때 - 배는 어때? Am I correct?
Tim: YES! You are correct! Then, how about..."How is your stomach? Are you all right" in Korean is...?
Debbie: Hm... 배는 어때? "How is your stomach?" + "Are you all right?" (천천히 또박또박) 좀. 괜.찮.아? - 좀 괜찮아?
Tim: Excellent, Debbie! 짝짝짝!
Debbie: 하하! Listeners, it's your turn! Please repeat after Tim. "How is your stomach? Are you all right?"
Tim: 배는 어때? 좀 괜찮아?
[pause]
Debbie: Great! Well, that's all for this lesson. Remember that if you want to improve on your Korean quickly...
Tim: You have to stop by KoreanClass101.com and pick up the lesson notes.
Debbie: It also has the conversation transcript, vocabulary, sample sentences, and a grammar explanation. Tim, I am really sorry about smacking your head earlier. 머리는 어때, 좀 괜찮아? "How is your head? Are you all right?"
Tim: (힘차게 feeling energized) 응, 난 괜찮아 "Yes, I am all right!" 여러분, 다음시간에 또 만나요~~

Grammar

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16 Comments

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Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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You can find a Practice Sheet for this Absolute Beginner Season 2 Lesson 22. 
Click on https://www.koreanclass101.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=5

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Saturday at 3:13 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Daniel,


Thank you for commenting. We actually have a lesson series on particles, and the first two lessons are on subject and topic marking particles:


https://www.koreanclass101.com/lesson/particles-1-the-topic-marking-particles-eun-and-neun/

https://www.koreanclass101.com/lesson/particles-2-the-subject-marking-particles-i-and-ga/


Please give it a try!


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Daniel
Wednesday at 6:05 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi KoreanClass101,


I am asking myself what is the difference between the Subject Partikels 는 and 가. When do I use 는 and when 가? Or is this not important because the two are Subject Partikels.

KoreanClass101.com
Wednesday at 7:54 am
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Hi Greg,


No problem, thanks for always keeping an eye out for mistakes.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Greg B
Monday at 2:29 pm
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My bad. I missed the ㄴ did not see it.

Greg B
Monday at 2:25 pm
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2/3/19


From this lesson, koreanclass101.com/lesson/absolute-beginner-s2-22-please-tell-me-youre-feeling-all-right-in-korean/?lp=114


B: 팀, 나 수진이야. 좀 괜찮아?


B: tim, na sujiniya. jom gwaenchana?


No "na" needed at the end, right?


B: tim, na sujiniya. jom gwaencha?

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Wednesday at 2:41 pm
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Hi Vivian,


Right, pal-gwa dari does not need any particles such as neun or eun.

In Korean, it is not obligatory to distinguish nouns as singular or plural.

Paldeul-gwa darideul actually sounds very awkward to native Koreans. :sweat_smile:


Regards,

Claire

Team KoreanClass101.com

Vivian
Sunday at 2:54 am
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In this lesson, "arms and legs" is Pal (arm) + gwa (and) + dari (leg). Since it's not a sentence, it's doesn't need "neun" or "eun", right? But shouldn't they have a plural particle? (which is "deul") ? Shouldn't it be pal-deul + gwa + darideul?

Koreanclass101.comVerified
Thursday at 7:51 pm
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Hello Yuki,




Thank you for your question and that is a good one!


Both basically are in the category of aching and pain yet it has got slightly different context.


쑤시다 is when the pain is lighter and it's more of 'sore' so it it becomes more of 'bother'.


For example, when you would like to say after work out,


I'm getting muscle pain on the neck (and it's bothering)

-> 목이 쑤시다.


On the other hand, 아프다, is literally hurting or when you are injured.


So when you would like to say after bumped into something heavy and it literally feels like having bruises on your feet and so on, then


My feet are in pain/hurting

-> 발이 아프다.


쑤시다 is also something to do with muscle and almost poking feeling if you know what I mean - even when your internal organs like stomach feels getting poked everywhere, you could also express as 배가 쑤시다.


Does that give you some insight?:)





Thank you


Madison

Team Koreanclass101.com

Yuki
Wednesday at 9:48 am
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How should we apply words 쑤시다 (sore/ache) & 아프네 (sore/pain) into a sentence? Both sound like with the same meaning? Thanks you!

Koreanclass101.comVerified
Thursday at 10:05 pm
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Hello Carey,



Thank you for making a good point!


I am assuming you may be from England as the normal greeting there is more like are you alright than the how are you?:)


But the context in Korea is a bit different - people don't ask as in are you alright, 괜찮아, between friends to ask how they are doing.


In restaurants and such formal hospitality occasion, 괜찮습니까 is well used to check meaning if everything is okay so the clients could respond if it is good or not.


Between friends, we usually say what are you doing, 머하고 있어, instead of how you are doing which is quite odd compared to English!;)




Thank you


Madison

Team Koreanclass101.com