Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Debbie: Hello, and welcome back to the KoreanPOD101.com , the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Korean! I'm joined in the studio by...
Tim: Hello everyone. Tim here.
Tim: Hello everyone! This is Tim and welcome back to KoreanClass101.com.
Debbie: With us, you'll learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Tim: We also provide you with cultural insights...
Debbie: That's right! In the previous lesson, we just learned a children song called, "Three Bears". We had a lot of fun singing and learning!
Tim: Yes, we did!
Debbie: If you haven't heard the previous lesson yet, please give it a listen!
Tim: Yes! You will not only learn Korean, but you will also learn how to sing, "Three Bears" 곰 세마리.
Debbie: Okay, moving on...What are we learning today, Tim?
Tim: Today we are going to learn about the usage of 도 "too, also and as well".
Debbie: I believe we've already talked about the usage of 도 in lessons 7 and 15, right?
Tim: Yes. We briefly covered 도 in Lessons 7 and15, but in this lesson, we will learn about 도 in more detail.
Debbie: Sounds interesting! Where does this conversation take place?
Tim: On the street - 길에서
Debbie: The conversation is between...
Tim: Tim and Sujin.
Debbie: Since this conversation is between friends, the speakers will use informal Korean.
Tim: 반말 입니다.
Debbie: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
(기진 맥진, 힘이 없는 목소리로)
(기진 맥진, 힘이 없는 목소리로)
팀: 수진, 이제 그만 가자. 난 목이 좀 아프네....
수진: 나도 목이 좀 아퍼...
팀: 우리 물을 좀 마시자...
수진: 물만? 우리 주스도 좀 마셔보자...
팀: 그래, 저기에서 마실까?
수진: 여기도 좋을거 같아...
팀: 그래!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
팀: 수진, 이제 그만 가자. 난 목이 좀 아프네....
수진: 나도 목이 좀 아퍼...
팀: 우리 물을 좀 마시자...
수진: 물만? 우리 주스도 좀 마셔보자...
팀: 그래, 저기에서 마실까?
수진: 여기도 좋을거 같아...
팀: 그래!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
(기진 맥진, 힘이 없는 목소리로)
Debbie: Sujin, let's go now. I have a sore throat...
팀: 수진, 이제 그만 가자. 난 목이 좀 아프네....
Debbie: I also have a sore throat...
수진: 나도 목이 좀 아퍼...
Debbie: Let's drink some water...
팀: 우리 물을 좀 마시자...
Debbie: Only water? Let's drink some juice as well...
수진: 물만? 우리 주스도 좀 마셔보자...
Debbie: Okay. How about drinking it over there?
팀: 그래, 저기에서 마실까?
Debbie: (I think) It's fine here, too!
수진: 여기도 좋을거 같아...
Debbie: Okay!
팀: 그래!
Debbie
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Debbie: Tim has a sore throat! Did he get a cold?
Tim: I don't know...You may find out in the next lesson.
Debbie: I really hope he gets well soon!
Tim: Me, too!
Debbie: So Tim...How do you say, 'to feel pain'?
Tim: Ah~~ 아.프.다 - 아프다. "to feel pain", or "to hurt".
Debbie: In this dialogue, both Sujin and Tim have a sore throat. How do we say that in Korean?
Tim: Hmm... hmm...
Debbie: Tim...
Tim: I can't tell you about it right now...
Debbie: Why not?
Tim: Because... We're going to learn about that expression in Lesson 23.
Debbie: Really? Does that mean Tim will definitely be sick?
Tim: 하하~~ Maybe...maybe not! All I can say to you is that you guys have to keep listening to find out!
Debbie: Okay...Now let's move on to the lesson vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Debbie: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Tim: 이제 [natural native speed]
Debbie: now
Tim: 이제 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 이제 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 가다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: to go
Tim: 가다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 가다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 목 [natural native speed]
Debbie: throat, neck
Tim: 목 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 목 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 좀 [natural native speed]
Debbie: a bit, a little
Tim: 좀 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 좀 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 아프다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: to hurt, to be in pain, to be painful
Tim: 아프다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 아프다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 도 [natural native speed]
Debbie: too, also
Tim: 도 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 도 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 우리 [natural native speed]
Debbie: we, us, our
Tim: 우리 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 우리 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 마시다 [natural native speed]
Debbie: to drink
Tim: 마시다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 마시다 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 물 [natural native speed]
Debbie: water
Tim: 물 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 물 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 만 [natural native speed]
Debbie: only
Tim: 만 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 만 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 주스 [natural native speed]
Debbie: juice
Tim: 주스 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 주스 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 저기 [natural native speed]
Debbie: there, over there
Tim: 저기 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 저기 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 여기 [natural native speed]
Debbie: here, this place
Tim: 여기 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 여기 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 좋을거 같아. [natural native speed]
Debbie: I think it is good.
Tim: 좋을거 같아. [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 좋을거 같아. [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...?
Tim: 아.프.다 - 아프다.
Debbie: Meaning, "feel pain or be sick"
Tim: 아프다 is a common expression when Korean people get sick or feel pain. Please repeat after me,
아프다
[pause]
Debbie: The next word is...
Tim: 목 - 목
Debbie: Meaning "throat or neck".
Tim: 목 literally means "neck". However...
Debbie: 목 (mok) can also mean "throat"...especially when say that you have "a sore throat". " I have a sore throat" is...?
Tim: 목.이. 아.파.요 - 목이 아파요.
Debbie: Tim, we're going to learn how to use this expression in Lesson 23, right?
Tim: Yes, so please look forward to it.
Debbie: Okay. The last word is...
Tim: 마.시.다 - 마시다.
Debbie: Meaning "to drink". Please repeat after Tim. "To drink"
Tim: 마시다.
[pause]
Debbie: By the way, Tim?
Tim: 응?
Debbie: In this dialogue, 마시자 "let's drink", 마셔보자 "let's drink together" and 마실까? "shall we drink?" all come from 마시다 "to drink", right?
Tim: That's right! But these forms are a little advanced for this level. Knowing that 마시다 is "to drink", is good enough for now.
Debbie: Good to know! Now let's review today's vocab. First, I will say the word in English and Tim will say the Korean after me. Then, you guys repeat after Tim. Are you ready? Here it goes...
Debbie: "To feel pain or Be sick"
Tim: 아프다
[pause]
Debbie: "Neck or throat"
Tim: 목
[pause]
Debbie: "To drink"
Tim: 마시다
[pause]
Debbie: Wonderful job! Now let's move on to today's grammar point.

Lesson focus

Debbie: The focus of this lesson is about the usage of 도 (do), which means "too, also, as well".
Tim: We briefly covered 도 in Lessons 7 and 15. Okay, now let's review! What's the meaning of 도, Debbie?
Debbie: The particle 도 expresses the meaning of 'too', 'also' or 'as well' when attached to a noun or another particle. And what's the formation, Tim?
Tim: The formation is Noun or Particle + 도.
Debbie: Today we are going to learn about how 도 is used in three different parts of a sentence...the subject, the object and another particle, right?
Tim: Yes Debbie! Okay, first let's take a look at how 도 is used with the subject. What's "Debbie eats" in Korean?
Debbie: 데비가 "Debbie", 먹습니다 "eats".
Tim: How about..."Tim eats, too" in Korean is...?
Debbie: 팀(강조 emphasizing) "도" "Tim too", 먹습니다 "eats".
Debbie: So Tim, the particle 가 or 이 becomes 도 , right?
Tim: Yes! Here's another example 데비가 일합니다 is "Debbie works" so... "Tim ALSO works" is...?
Debbie: 팀이 "Tim" + 도 "also" + 일합니다 "works", so it's.... 팀 (강조) "도" 일합니다. Please repeat after Tim. "Debbie works".
Tim: 데비"가" 일합니다.
[pause]
Debbie: "Tim also works."
Tim: 팀"도" 일합니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Great! This time, let's try it with the object. What's "He drinks coffee" in Korean?
Tim: 그는 "He", 커피 (강조) "를" "coffee", 마십니다 "to drink". All together, 그는 커피를 마십니다.
Debbie: How about... "He drinks juice as well" in Korean?
Tim: 그는 "He", 쥬스 (강조) 를 "juice", 마십니다 "to drink" + 도 "as well" becomes 그는, 쥬스(강조) "도" 마십니다. He drinks juice as well.
Debbie: Please repeat after Tim. "He drinks coffee" is...
Tim: 그는 커피"를" 마십니다.
[pause]
Debbie: and "He drinks juice as well" is...?
Tim: 그는 쥬스"도" 마십니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Excellent! Lastly, let's take a look at how it's used with particles.
Tim: The formation is simple - particle + 도. Can we have some examples, Debbie?
Debbie: On Sunday is...
Tim: 일요일에.
Debbie: And "on Monday (강조) TOO" is...?
Tim: 월요일에 "on Monday" + 도 "too", so "on Monday too" is 월요일에"도". Please repeat after me, 월요일에"도"
[pause]
Debbie: Okay, "at home" is...?
Tim: 집에서.
Debbie: And "at home, too" is...?
Tim: 집에서"도".
Debbie: How about "at the office as well" is...?
Tim: 회사에서 "at the office" + 도 "as well", so "at the office as well" is 회사에서"도". Please repeat after me, 회사에서"도"
[pause]
Debbie: Let's try it together with a simple sentence. What's "The clothes are in here"?
Tim: 옷이 "The clothes", 여기에 "in here", 있습니다 "are". So, 옷이, 여기에, 있습니다.
Debbie: How about... what's "The clothes are over there, too"?
Tim: 옷이 "The clothes", 저기에 "over there" + 도 "too", 있습니다 "are" so...
Debbie: Please repeat after Tim. "The clothes are over there, too" is...?
Tim: 옷이 저기에"도" 있습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: WOW! Excellent job, you guys! Okay. That's all for this lesson. Don't forget that you can leave us a comment or some feedback on this lesson.
Tim: It's very easy to do. Just stop by KoreanClass101.com, and click on comments,
Debbie: Enter your comment and name,
Tim: And that's it!
Debbie: No excuses! We're really looking forward to hearing from you! Okay, everyone. See you next time.
Tim: 여러분 다음시간까지 안녕~~

Grammar

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25 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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You can find a Practice Sheet for this Absolute Beginner Season 2 Lesson 21. 
Click on https://www.koreanclass101.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=5

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 12:38 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi deepanshi sharma,


Thank you for your comment.

Your name in Hangul would be 디판시(di-pan-shi) 샤르마(sha-reu-ma).

Hope this helps you. Thanks!


Best,

Jiye

Team KoreanClass101.com

deepanshi sharma
Tuesday at 02:41 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

hello!

can you please tell me waht will be my korean name

my name- deepanshi sharma

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:31 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Hazel,


Thanks for posting. The meaning is essentially the same but the grammar is slightly different. In one sentence 'clothes' is the subject and has the subject marking particle accompanying it, and in the other it is the topic of the sentence (which is why you see the topic marking particle eun/neun after it). We have a lesson series which will be of help:


https://www.koreanclass101.com/lesson-library/particles/


Please check out the first two lessons!


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Hazel
Wednesday at 04:39 PM
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Hi,

I have a question.. is it 옷이 저기에도 있습니다 or 옷은 저기에도 있습니다? which is correct? I am confused now over the 옷이 and 옷은. 😳

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 04:46 PM
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Hi Rio,


Thanks for posting. 좋을 거 같아 is the shortened version of 좋을 것 같아.

And the difference between 좋을 거 같아 and 좋은 거 같아 is the tense--the former is future tense, whereas the latter is present tense. However, people use these phrases interchangeably as both are used to say 'I think it is good'.


Hope this was of help.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Rio
Monday at 02:19 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello KC101 team,


Just to follow on from Michi's question, it appears there are two ways to say/write, 'I think it is good'. The lesson dialogue says and writes - 좋을거 같아, with rieul in the batchim, but the sentence example in the lesson vocab section uses 좋은거 같아 with nieun in the batchim instead of rieul. Is there a specific reason for the difference?


Thank you so much for your help!

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 05:29 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Michi,


Thank you for posting. 좋을거 같아 is romanized and pronounced as joeulgeo data. If there was a 'n' sound rather than 'l', then the sentence would have been written as 좋은거 같아.


Hope this was of help.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Michi
Tuesday at 12:10 PM
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Hello, I was wondering why 좋을거 같아. joeungeo gata , the Korean version got an L and the pronounciation got an N....

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 12:26 PM
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Hi Laëti,


Thanks for posting. I think you made the same inquiry in a different lesson and we answered it, but just in case, ~네 is used when the speaker is expressing surprise.


Hope this was of help.

Best

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Laëti
Thursday at 11:32 AM
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Hello,


Why does he say 아프네 instead of 아파요 ?