Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Debbie:
Hello, and welcome back to the KoreanPOD101.com , the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Korean! I'm joined in the studio by...
Tim:
Hello everyone. Tim here.
Debbie:
안녕하세요 KoreanClass101.com listeners. Debbie here. I am joined in the studio by...
Tim:
Tim! 방가 방가 여러분!
Debbie:
Tim? (Tim 응) Can I ask you about something?
Tim:
Yes!
Debbie:
Do you like to have snacks between meals?
Tim:
Yes, sometimes... why?
Debbie:
What kind of Korean snacks do you like?
Tim:
Hmmm... I (강조하며) "like"... 떡볶이... and 순대...and...
Debbie:
What? 순대? I can't eat 순대. I mean... I do (강조하며) not like 순대. I mean.. it's pig intestines, right?
Tim:
하하. It's not for everyone, but I (강조하며) "like" 순대.
Debbie:
Let's stop talking about 순대. I get grossed out just thinking about it.
Tim:
Okay! I understand.
Debbie:
So let's talk about today's topic. What's today's topic?
Tim:
Today's topic is about 떡볶이 &(신나하며) "순대"!
Debbie:
Really? No...Please tell me you're joking.
Tim:
Yeah. I'm just kidding. Today we are going to learn how to say (강조하며) "to like" and "not to like".
Debbie:
Ah...For example, Tim likes 순대 and I do not like 순대, right?
Tim:
Yes!
Debbie:
Where does this conversation take place?
Tim:
At a Korean restaurant - 식당에서.
Debbie:
The conversation is between...?
Tim:
Tim and Sujin.
Debbie:
Since the conversation is between friends, the speakers will use "informal" Korean.
Tim:
반말 입니다.
Debbie:
Let's listen to the conversation!
Debbie:
In this lesson you'll will learn about 좋다 / 안 좋다 / 싫다
Tim:
This conversation takes place at the Korean restaurant
Debbie:
The conversation is between Tim and Sujin
Tim:
The speakers are friends, therefore the speakers will be speaking informal Korean - 반말 입니다
DIALOGUE
(lively and crowded)
(lively and crowded)
팀:
수진. 여기야 ! 무엇이 좋아?
수진:
난 냉면이 좋아, 넌?
팀:
난 떡볶이와 순대가 좋아.
수진:
난 떡볶이 싫은데...
팀:
왜 떡볶이 안 좋아해?
수진:
너무 매워서...
English Host:
Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
팀:
수진. 여기야 ! 무엇이 좋아?
수진:
난 냉면이 좋아, 넌?
팀:
난 떡볶이와 순대가 좋아.
수진:
난 떡볶이 싫은데...
팀:
왜 떡볶이 안 좋아해?
수진:
너무 매워서...
English Host:
Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
(lively and crowded)
Debbie(lively and crowded)
팀:
수진. 여기야 ! 무엇이 좋아?
Debbie:
Sujin, I'm here! What would you like to have?
수진:
난 냉면이 좋아, 넌?
Debbie:
I'd like to have a cold noodles ("naengmyeon"), you?
팀:
난 떡볶이와 순대가 좋아.
Debbie:
I'd like to have spicy rice cakes ("tteokbokki") and blood sausage ("soondae").
수진:
난 떡볶이 싫은데...
Debbie:
I wouldn't like spicy rice cakes ("tteokbokki")...
팀:
왜 떡볶이 안 좋아해?
Debbie:
Why wouldn't you like spicy rice cakes ("tteokbokki")?
수진:
너무 매워서...
Debbie:
It's too spicy...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Tim:
Hmm... 냉면, 떡볶이, 순대... Yummy! I (강조) "like" 순대 a lot!
Debbie:
(화나고 역겨운 목소리로 voice of anger and disgust) Gross!
Tim:
I'm sorry, Debbie, but I can't help myself whenever I imagine 순대!
Debbie:
Tim, I think we should give our listeners some info about 냉면, 떡뽁이 and 순대. Don't you think?
Tim:
Yes! Especially about 순대!
Debbie:
(마지못해서 being compelling) You can tell the listeners about 순대...
Tim:
(신난 목소리로)Okay! Let's talk about 떡볶이 first.
Debbie:
떡볶이 is "spicy rice cakes". It's quite spicy, so have water with you always when you decide to try 떡볶이.
Tim:
Who (강조) "likes" 떡볶이, Debbie?
Debbie:
Many young Korean children and teenagers love to eat 떡볶이 "spicy rice cakes".
Tim:
I also "like" to eat 떡볶이! Next, let's talk about 냉면...
Debbie:
냉면 is (강조) "a cold Korean noodle dish" and is usually in a tangy broth with a slice of a pear, a boiled egg, and beef.
Tim:
When do we usually eat 냉면?
Debbie:
It's (강조) "a cold Korean noodle dish" so Korean people often have 냉면 on a (강조) hot summer day!
Tim:
Yes! Last, we have... 순대! 빰빠라 빰!
Debbie:
Oh boy, Tim! 순대 is blood sausage. It's "intestines stuffed with noodles". Yes, listeners, 순대 is made from (강조) the intestines of pigs! I don't think 순대 looks appetizing at all.
Tim:
I think 순대 looks (강조) so delicious and it tastes fantastic! Debbie, we have photos of them, right?
Debbie:
Yes. We do. We have photos of all of three on our Facebook page. Visit KoreanClass101.com's Facebook page and click on (강조) "photos". Then click on (강조) "food in Korea".
Tim:
Yes! You will be able to witness a (강조) beautiful picture of 순대!
Debbie:
I feel nauseous. Let's move on to the vocab before I get sick.
VOCAB LIST
Debbie:
Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
The first word we shall see is:
Tim:
무엇 [natural native speed]
Debbie:
what
Tim:
무엇 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
무엇 [natural native speed]
Next:
Tim:
냉면 [natural native speed]
Debbie:
Korean cold noodles
Tim:
냉면 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
냉면 [natural native speed]
Next:
Tim:
떡볶이 [natural native speed]
Debbie:
spicy rice cakes
Tim:
떡볶이 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
떡볶이 [natural native speed]
Next:
Tim:
순대 [natural native speed]
Debbie:
Korean blood sausage (intestine stuffed with noodles)
Tim:
순대 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
순대 [natural native speed]
Next:
Tim:
좋다 [natural native speed]
Debbie:
to like, to be good
Tim:
좋다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
좋다 [natural native speed]
Next:
Tim:
안 좋다 [natural native speed]
Debbie:
to not like, to be bad
Tim:
안 좋다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
안 좋다 [natural native speed]
Next:
Tim:
왜? [natural native speed]
Debbie:
why?
Tim:
왜? [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
왜? [natural native speed]
Next:
Tim:
맵다 [natural native speed]
Debbie:
to be spicy
Tim:
맵다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
맵다 [natural native speed]
Next:
Tim:
여기 [natural native speed]
Debbie:
here, this place
Tim:
여기 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
여기 [natural native speed]
Next:
Tim:
싫다 [natural native speed]
Debbie:
to hate, to dislike
Tim:
싫다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
싫다 [natural native speed]
Next:
Tim:
너무 [natural native speed]
Debbie:
very, very much so
Tim:
너무 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim:
너무 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Debbie:
Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Debbie:
The first word is...?
Tim:
무.엇 - 무엇.
Debbie:
Meaning "what". 무엇 "what" is one of the "interrogative pronouns". But Tim? I've often heard of the shortened form of 무엇. Can you say it for us?
Tim:
Sure! 무엇 becomes 뭐. Both 무엇 and 뭐 mean "what". However, use 뭐 in informal Korean. Listeners, please repeat after me, "무엇[pause]뭐[pause]
Tim:
Can you give us an example?
Debbie:
Hmm... how about... "what is this?"
Tim:
"this" 이것은, "what" 무엇, "is?" 입니까? So all together...
Debbie:
"What is this?" is...
Tim:
Please repeat after me. 이것은 무엇 입니까?
[pause]
Tim:
or 이것은 뭐 입니까?
[pause]
Debbie:
Great! Next we have...
Tim:
좋.아 - 좋아 and 싫.어 - 싫어.
Debbie:
Korean people often use those two words - 좋아 "like" and 싫어 "hate". 좋아 and 싫어 are informal. We will talk about them more later on in the lesson focus. For now, let's simply try to pronounce them.
Tim:
Please repeat after me. "like" 좋아
[pause]
Tim:
and "hate" 싫어
[pause]
Debbie:
Great! Last, we have...
Tim:
떡.볶.이 - 떡볶이 and 순.대 - 순대.
Debbie:
We've already talked about them.
Tim:
Yes. 떡볶이 is spicy rice cakes and...
Debbie:
순대 is blood sausages. 떡볶이 and 순대 are very popular snacks in Korea. Let's simply try to pronounce the words.
Tim:
Listeners, please repeat after me. 떡볶이
[pause]
Tim:
순대
[pause]
Debbie:
Great! Now let's move on to the grammar point!
LESSON FOCUS
Debbie:
The focus of this lesson is how to use 좋아 "like", 안좋아 "don't like", and 싫어 "hate".
Tim:
Before further explanation, remember this - 좋아, 안좋아 and 싫어 are (강조) "informal" speech.
Debbie:
Okay! Let's start from 좋아 (jo-a) like (casual informal) and to add some degree of politeness, attach 요 (yo) at the end.
Tim:
좋아 + 요 = 좋아요 (casual formal) Please repeat after me. 좋아요
[pause]
Debbie:
Listeners, we've also learned about 좋아, 좋아 "good, good" in Absolute Beginner Season 2 Lesson 7. Remember?
Tim:
Yes. in lesson 7, 좋아 was an adjective; however, in this lesson, 좋아 is a verb. Please don't get those confused!
Debbie:
Can you tell us how we make a sentence using 좋아?
Tim:
Okay. The formation is... 나는 "I" + Noun + particles (이/가) + 좋아 (jo-a) "I like (noun)". Now we need more examples...
Debbie:
Okay... how about... "I like 떡볶이"?
Tim:
Good one! 난 "I" + 떡볶이(강조) "가" + 좋아 "like", so all together,
Debbie:
"I like 떡볶이" is...?
Tim:
Please repeat after me. Informal Version. 난 떡볶이가 좋아.
[pause]
Tim:
or Formal Version. 나는 떡볶이가 좋아요.
[pause]
Debbie:
Wonderful! Now we have 안 좋아 "don't like".
Tim:
Listeners, please repeat after me. 안 좋아
[pause]
Debbie:
Let's try it with a sample sentence. How about "I don't like 떡볶이"?
Tim:
난 "I" + 떡볶이"가" + 안 좋아 "don't like" so all together...
Debbie:
"I don't like 떡볶이" is...?
Tim:
Please repeat after me. Informal Version. 난 떡볶이가 안 좋아.
[pause]
Tim:
or Formal Version.나는 떡볶이가 안 좋아요.
[pause]
Debbie:
This time...How about "I hate 순대"?
Tim:
난 "I" + 순대"가" + 싫어 "hate". so all together,
Debbie:
"I hate 순대" is...?
Tim:
Please repeat after me. Informal Version. 난 순대가 싫어.
[pause]
Tim:
or Formal Version.나는 순대가 싫어요.
[pause]
Debbie:
Fantastic! That's all for this lesson. If you want to see the pictures of 냉면, 순대, 떡볶이, please visit KoreanClass101.com's Facebook page.
Tim:
Yes. You will see a beautiful picture of "순대"!
Debbie:
Tim! It's ugly!
Tim:
여러분 다음시간까지 안녕~~!

Grammar

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9 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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You can find a Practice Sheet for this Absolute Beginner Season 2 Lesson 18. 
Click on https://www.koreanclass101.com/forum/viewforum.php?f=5

Thursday at 9:05 am
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Hi Ian,

Thanks for sharing your tip with us!

Cheers,
Lyn
Team KoreanClass101.com

Ian
Wednesday at 8:51 am
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I think hearing ‘Like’ by CLC is a great way of remembering how to say like in Korean. 😄

Tuesday at 3:03 pm
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안녕하세요 조이씨,

Thank you for posting. Both mean ‘No(I don’t want to)’, however, ‘싫은데’ is informal, whereas ‘싫어요/싫습니다’ would be a more formal way of stating that you do not want to do whatever was proposed by the other person.

Best,
Lyn
Team KoreanClass101.com

조이
Sunday at 10:18 am
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What’s the difference between 싫은데 and 싫어요?

Monday at 2:45 pm
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Hi jesse,

We use the particle 이/가 for 좋아요./싫어요. and the particle -을/를 for 좋아해요./싫어해요.

Hope this helps.😄

Regards,
Claire
Team KoreanClass101.com

jesse
Thursday at 2:45 am
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I notice that the example sentences in the lesson PDF’s Grammer sections B & C (안 좋아해 & 싫어해) almost always use the object marker 을/를 on the noun whereas section A (좋아) uses the subject marker 이/가. There’s one example in the “Sample Sentence” section that uses the subject marker for the “dislike” construction (저는 겨울이 싫어요).
Is there a reason to use one particle or the other? I can see the case for either.
Thanks!

나는 떡볶이가 좋아요!

Thursday at 9:50 am
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하하~~ 저도 싫어했어요 (어렸을때)…
Thank you for listening, Kayla~~^^
cheers,

Tim 😎

Kayla
Wednesday at 11:23 am
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저는 김치가 싫어요.