Lesson Transcript

Keith: Hi and welcome back. This is our fourth installment on our video series on how to read and write Korean. My name is Keith and I am back with my lovely and beautiful co-host Seol.
Seol: Hi. 안녕하세요.
Keith: Well in our last video, we went over Korean words that had one consonant, one vowel and one consonant. What about our fourth video?
Seol: We will go over everything else.
Keith: Pretty simple, everything else. So this video should get you one step closer to learning how to read and write Korean. All right, as we mentioned before, we will be going over everything else. Syllabic blocks can consist of more than one consonant and more than one vowel and sounding these out is quite logical. So let’s go over it. First we will go over three Koreanized English words. The first word we have starts with
Seol: ㅋ
Keith: And now
Seol: ㅣ
Keith: And this should be pretty easy, what is this?
Seol: 키.
Keith: Okay. Next we start with
Seol: ㅇ and this has no sound value.
Keith: And this is because it’s in the first position again. Okay now we have
Seol: ㅜ
Keith: And now
Seol: ㅣ
Keith: Okay. Here there is two vowels here. Notice how the vowel with the long horizontal line was written on the bottom first and then the long vertical line was written second. And the sound for these two vowels are
Seol: ㅜ
Keith: And
Seol: ㅣ
Keith: If you say these two real fast,
Seol: ㅜ, ㅣ, ㅟ.
Keith: It kind of merges into one vowel. So once again, it’s
Seol: 위.
Keith: Okay. Altogether we have
Seol: 키위.
Keith: And this is kiwi. Not so difficult. Pretty much the same as in Korean. All right, let’s move on to our next word. We start with
Seol: ㅇ
Keith: And now please pay attention to the vowels we have.
Seol: ㅜ
Keith: And
Seol: ㅓ
Keith: Now
Seol: ㅣ
Keith: Three vowels. Notice once again the vowel on the bottom is written first and then the vertical vowels to the right and this sound is
Seol: 웨.
Keith: The next two are very simple. Let’s go over it real quick. First we have
Seol: ㅇ
Keith: And now
Seol: ㅣ
Keith: And now we have
Seol: ㅌ
Keith: And now
Seol: ㅓ
Keith: And this makes
Seol: 터.
Keith: These three syllables are
Seol: 웨이터.
Keith: It shouldn’t be too difficult. This is waiter in Korean. Our last Koreanized English word starts with
Seol: ㅎ
Keith: And now
Seol: ㅗ
Keith: This is
Seol: 호.
Keith: And now we start with
Seol: ㅌ
Keith: And now the vowel
Seol: ㅓ
Keith: And now we have another vowel
Seol: ㅣ
Keith: This sound is
Seol: ㅔ
Keith: And we finish with
Seol: ㄹ
Keith: On the bottom. Okay here it’s
Seol: 텔.
Keith: Altogether we have
Seol: 호텔.
Keith: And this is simply hotel. Now for our Korean words, we start with
Seol: ㅇ
Keith: And now start from the bottom with
Seol: ㅗ
Keith: And now to the right
Seol: ㅏ
Keith: These two make the sound
Seol: ㅗ, ㅏ, ㅘ
Keith: And now we end with
Seol: ㅇ
Keith: Which has a ng like sound when it’s in the last position. Can you do it for us again? This syllable is
Seol: 왕.
Keith: Okay. Do you hear that ng like sound, it’s because ㅇ is in the last position. Next we have
Seol: ㅈ
Keith: And now
Seol: ㅏ
Keith: And simply this is
Seol: 자.
Keith: Altogether this is
Seol: 왕자.
Keith: Which is exactly what I am.
Seol: A prince.
Keith: You don’t believe me.
Seol: No.
Keith: All right, next word. Next we start with
Seol: ㅇ
Keith: And now
Seol: ㅗ
Keith: From the bottom and now we have
Seol: ㅣ
Keith: Which comes to the right. The sound these two vowels make is
Seol: ㅚ
Keith: Our next syllable starts with
Seol: ㄱ
Keith: And now we have
Seol: ㅕ
Keith: And now the vowel to the right.
Seol: ㅣ
Keith: Which makes the sound
Seol: ㅖ
Keith: Now we have
Seol: ㅇ
Keith: With
Seol: ㅣ
Keith: To the right and now
Seol: ㄴ
Keith: In the last position which makes the sound
Seol: 인.
Keith: And altogether this is
Seol: 외계인.
Keith: And this is exactly what you are, Seol.
Seol: No, I am not an alien.
Keith: Just kidding, joking, joking, joking. All right, so let’s finish it up. Our last word starts with
Seol: ㄱ
Keith: And now
Seol: ㅗ
Keith: Together this makes
Seol: 고.
Keith: Now our next syllabic block starts with the consonant
Seol: ㅁ
Keith: And now the vowel
Seol: ㅏ
Keith: To the right and this is pretty simple.
Seol: 마.
Keith: Okay lastly we have
Seol: ㅇ
Keith: And now the vowel
Seol: ㅜ
Keith: To the bottom and now to the right, the vowel
Seol: ㅓ
Keith: The sound these two make is
Seol: ㅜ,ㅓ, ㅝ
Keith: Okay altogether this is
Seol: 고마워.
Keith: You are welcome.
Seol: Yeah. Keith just made a bad joke again. This means thanks.
Keith: All right, sorry about that folks. All right, well let’s get into the review section of this video. We will have the same words we just went over but this time, you will have a few seconds before our Korean expert, Seol, over here gives you the answer. So 화이팅.
Seol: 화이팅! 키위, 웨이터, 호텔, 왕자, 외계인, 고마워.
Keith: All right folks that’s going to do it for this video. Thanks for watching our fourth installment of our how to read and write Korean series. Be sure to stop by KoreanClass101.com, leave us a post and ask us any questions if you have anything. All right, that’s going to do it.
Seol: 안녕.

63 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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That's the end of the series! Tell us what you think! Are we missing a few things here and there? Is there anything else you'd like us to go over?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:24 AM
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Hi Sai,


Thank you for posting and we are sorry to hear it was difficult for you. The lesson shows you the how the double vowels came to be--so if it is confusing for you please memorize the actual sound. 😄


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Sai
Friday at 11:07 PM
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This video is little hard to understand specially when it comes to combining consonants like 외 u understanding the pronunciation was hard for me.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 04:32 PM
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Hello Nelly,


Thank you for posting.

It seems the video works fine with this lesson.


Could you check if you have a free lifetime account? Those who have the free lifetime account can access only up to lesson 3 for free. If you have basic or premium membership, please let me know which error message you see on the screen. It’d be great if you could send us an email at contactus@KoreanClass101.com so that we can take a look at the issue closely.


Thank you,

Lena

Team KoreanClass101.com

Nelly
Wednesday at 08:38 PM
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My audio didn't play but I enjoyed the lesson transcript. It was helpful and learnt a lot. Gamsahabnida

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:30 PM
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Hi Anissa,


Thank you for posting. ㅔ(e) takes on the 'eh' sound, whereas ㅚ(oe) is more of an 'weh' sound (like the 'we' sound in wet).


Hope this was of help!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Anissa
Friday at 05:59 AM
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When is ( eo + i = è ) and when ( o + i = è ) ? Or did I get it wrong that they both carry the same sound?

Thank you!

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:14 AM
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Hi John,


Thanks for the positive feedback. We're happy to hear that the lessons helped!

Please let us know if you have any inquiries.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

John Reyan
Tuesday at 06:03 PM
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Did love all the series, despite with the absence of a Korean speaker around me, I manage to learn a lot from these lessons. Thanks

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 03:18 AM
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Hi Alya,


Thank you for posting. The horizontal lines on top of ㅎ can be written with both written horizontally, or with the top one written vertically. As for ㅈ and ㅊ, they could be written as you see it here, or with the vertical line starting from the middle and going down toward the right written NOT from the middle, but from the right end of the horizontal line toward the left, then the second vertical line starting from the MIDDLE of the first vertical line, heading right. Hope this made sense!


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Alya
Tuesday at 03:43 PM
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Hi! I'm wondering if there's a different way to write Korean 'h', 'j' and 'ch' because I have once seen someone write it in different ways.