Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo)
Hello and welcome to Korean survival phrases brought to you by KoreanClass101.com, this course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Korea. You will be surprised at how far a little Korean will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by KoreanClass101.com and there, you will find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us the comment.
In today’s lesson, we will introduce a phrase that is certain to come in handy for capturing your memories on film. Korea is full of beautiful scenery and there are times when you want to be in the picture or have everyone in your party in the picture. Therefore, there are times when the phrase, please take my or our picture will be invaluable. In Korean, please take my picture is 사진 찍어 주세요 (sajin jjigeo juseyo). And now by syllable, 사-진 찍-어 주-세-요 (sa-jin jji-geo ju-se-yo). Let’s break down the components. The first word is 사진 (sajin). This means picture. Let’s break down this word and hear it one more time. 사-진 (sa-jin). This is followed by 찍어 (jjigeo). This is the verb to take a picture. I guess in English, it can be expressed as snap as in snap a picture, 찍어 (jjigeo).
Lastly, we have the oh so important 주세요 (juseyo) which simply means please. So altogether we have 사진 찍어 주세요 (sajin jjigeo juseyo). Literally, this is picture take please. Translated it means please take a picture for me. In English, before someone takes a picture, the person taking the picture may say 1, 2, 3 cheers. In Korean, it’s a little cliché. Before a picture is taken, they may say 하나, 둘, 셋, 김치 (hana, dul, set, gimchi)! That’s so corny but you do hear it every now and then. So, let’s hear it one more time. 하나, 둘, 셋, 김치 (hana, dul, set, gimchi)! 하나 (hana) is 1, 둘 (dul) is 2, 셋 (set) is 3, and last is 김치 (ghimchi).
Okay. To close our today’s lesson, we’d like for you to practice what you’ve learned. I will provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out loud. You will have a few seconds before I give you the answer. So 화이팅 (hwaiting)!
Will you take my picture please - 사진 찍어 주세요 (sajin jjigeo juseyo).
1, 2, 3 cheese - 하나, 둘, 셋, 김치 (hana, dul, set, gimchi)!
All right, that’s going to do it for today. Remember to stop by KoreanClass101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment.

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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In Korea, people say, 'Kimchi!' instead of 'Cheese!' when taking a photo. What do you say in your country?

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 12:54 pm
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Hi Hemant,


Thank you for posting!


Ofelia

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Hemant
Friday at 11:27 am
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Haha! I love these cultural insights!


I tend to shout "everybody iss-mile!!"


Which is how villagers pronounce the word "smile"

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Hemant
Friday at 11:27 am
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Haha! I love these cultural insights!


I tend to shout "everybody iss-mile!!"


Which is how villagers pronounce the w