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Lesson Transcript

안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo)
Hello and welcome to Korean survival phrases brought to you by KoreanClass101.com, this course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Korea. You will be surprised at how far a little Korean will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by KoreanClass101.com and there, you will find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us the comment.
In today’s lesson, we will go over counting items. Now, in Korean, there are two systems of numbers that are used. One is the Sino-Korean system which have numbers with Chinese influences and the other is natively Korean. The numbers we will be using today are the native Korean numbers. When you first enter a restaurant, the staff will say 어서 오십시오 (eoseo osipsio) welcoming you. The next most likely question will be 몇 분이세요 (myeot buniseyo)? this means how many people. Let’s listen again. 몇 분이세요 (myeot buniseyo)? And now by syllable, 몇 분-이-세-요 (myeot bu-ni-se-yo)? Let’s break down the components. 몇 (myeot) means how many. 몇 (myeot). The next is 분 (bun) which is an honorific counter for people. 분 (bun). and the last part of the phrase 이세요 (iseyo) is the copula but in a respectful form. 이세요 (iseyo).
Literally this means how many people is. Translated, it means how many people are there, in your party is inferred. Now, how do we answer? Let’s start by going over the numbers 1 to 5. 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯 (hana, dul, set, net, daseot). One time slowly, it’s 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯 (hana, dul, set, net, daseot). And now by syllable 1 하나 (ha-na), 2 둘 (dul), 3 셋 (set), 4 넷 (net), 5 다-섯 (da-seot). And 1 to 5 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯 (hana, dul, set, net, daseot). When we add a counter to the end of numbers 1 to 4, 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷 (hana, dul, set, net), they change slightly in pronunciation. Let’s hear it with the counters for people which is 명 (myeong). This counter is the non-honorific counter for people. The non-honorific counter is used because you don’t honor yourself. The honorific counter 분 (bun) is used only when referring to other people. All right, for one person, it’s 한 명 (han myeong). The number 1 is 하나 (hana) but it changed to 한 (han) when we added the counter for people 명 (myeong) at the end.
Let’s hear it again slowly. 한 명 (han myeong). This means one person. The number 2 is 둘 (dul). When you add the counter, it changes to 두 명 (du myeong). This means two people. Three or 셋 (set) changes to 세 명 (se myeong). This is three people. And four, 넷 (net) when you add 명 (myeong) changes to 네 명 (ne myeong). This means four people. If you remember the number for five, it’s 다섯 (daseot). This does not change when you add any counters to the end of it. So why don’t you try getting a table for 5 people. It’s 다섯 명 (daseot myeong). If you have more than five people in your party, someone else is bound to speak Korean. So don’t worry too much.
Okay. To close our today’s lesson, we’d like for you to practice what you’ve learned. I will provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out loud. You will have a few seconds before I give you the answer. So 화이팅 (hwaiting)!
How many people or how many people are in your party - 몇 분이세요 (myeot buniseyo)?
One person - 한 명 (han myeong)
Two people - 두 명 (du myeong)
Three people - 세 명 (se myeong)
Four people - 네 명 (ne myeong)
Five people - 다섯 명 (daseot myeong)
All right, that’s going to do it for today. Remember to stop by KoreanClass101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment.

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KoreanClass101.com
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
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Let's practice "몇 분 이세요?" :)

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KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 11:15 am
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Hi Jeff,


Thanks for posting. Yes, there are various counters which can initially be difficult, so please feel free to take your time.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Jeff Hammond
Wednesday at 8:26 pm
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Wow.... This is a bit like Japanese where you have to use a different counter for every different object/person/place etc. I will come back to this later, I have other things I gotta work on first.

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 11:44 pm
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Hello Chris,


Thanks for posting, you're very welcome! ?

Please don't hesitate to let us know if you have any other inquiries.


Sincerely,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Chris
Saturday at 7:11 pm
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고맙습니다 ?

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KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 11:44 pm
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Hi Chris,


Thank you for posting. If you are using the polite form/suffixes, it already implies that you are being courteous, so there is no need to add a 'please'.

Hope this answered your question. Please let us know if you have any other inquiries!


Sincerely,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Chris
Monday at 10:53 pm
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Hi KoreanClass101,


Do we need to add a 'please' to be polite or is this not required?


Thank you

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KoreanClass101
Tuesday at 6:07 pm
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Hey 사가에,



For that case, we use chinese-based numbering system than the native.


It is very tricky part because when you count on things, we use native such as 열개 (10 of them).


However, for mentioning literally the number, chinese-based is more appropriate such as 십센트, 천달러.


It would take time on which one to use especially when it comes to numbering time and so on.


I would suggest to put 'count' on our search bar (right top) and we have some lessons that introduce ways to count.


Perhaps you would like to take a look! Since we have many, I did not directly link it here.


Please feel free to ask anytime if you have questions!





Thank you


Madison

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사가에
Tuesday at 3:10 pm
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안녕하세요

At expansion section we have this example

열 ten(Native Korean)

10 센트 동전 열 개면 1달러가 됩니다.

sip senteu dongjeon yeol kkaemyeon ildalreoga doemnida.

"Ten dimes make one dollar."

Is it correct to use native Korean numbers to count money ?

The example is using sip instead of yeol


감사합니다

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KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 3:47 pm
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Dear Sam


Please have a look at the Lesson Notes Lite version. Everything should be OK there.


Kind Regards


Piotr

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Sam
Monday at 9:20 pm
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Why is the PDF for this lesson all in Chinese characters? They don't even correspond to the meaning. Where can I find the hangul for this lesson. Cheers