Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Minkyong: 안녕하세요 (Annyeonghaseyo). KoreanClass101의 지민경입니다 (ui jimingyeongimnida).
Keith: Hey and I am Keith. What Does Your Profession Say About You in Korea? In this lesson, what are we talking about?
Minkyong: In this lesson, you will learn how to ask someone what they do for a living or what someone else does for a living.
Keith: All right. So this conversation takes place on a blind date, hoo!
Minkyong: And the conversation is between two people who met each other for the first time.
Keith: Well, that’s what a blind date is, right?
Minkyong: Hmm…
Keith: Okay, and the speakers, because they are meeting for the first time, of course
Minkyong: 존댓말 (jondaenmal)
Keith: Yeah they will be using polite Korean. Okay, let’s listen to the conversation.
Minkyong: 네, 들어 봅시다. (ne, deureo bopsida.)
DIALOGUE
남희 (namhui): 미선 씨, 어머니는 뭐 하세요? (Miseon ssi, eomeoni-neun mwo haseyo?)
미선 (miseon): 엄마는 주부예요. (eomma-neun jubuyeyo.)
남희 (namhui): 아... 아버지는 뭐 하세요? (a... abeoji-neun mwo haseyo?)
미선 (miseon): 아빠는 회사원이에요. (appa-neun heosawon-ieyo.)
남희 (namhui): 아... 오빠는 뭐 하세요? (a... oppa-neun mwo haseyo?)
미선 (miseon): 오빠는 경찰이에요. (oppa-neun gyeongchal-ieyo.)
남희 (namhui): 우와! 경찰이요? 언니는 뭐 하세요? (uwa! gyeongchal-iyo? eonni-neun mwo haseyo?)
미선 (miseon): 언니는 간호사예요. (eonni-neun ganhosa-yeyo.)
남희 (namhui): 간호사요? 우와... 저는 간호사를 정말 좋아해요. 언니 소개해 주세요. (ganhosa-yo? uwa... jeo-neun ganhosa-reul jeongmal joahaeyo. eonni sogae-hae juseyo.)
미선 (miseon): 네??? (ne???)
Seol: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
남희 (namhui): 미선 씨, 어머니는 뭐 하세요? (Miseon ssi, eomeoni-neun mwo haseyo?)
미선 (miseon): 엄마는 주부예요. (eomma-neun jubuyeyo.)
남희 (namhui): 아... 아버지는 뭐 하세요? (a... abeoji-neun mwo haseyo?)
미선 (miseon): 아빠는 회사원이에요. (appa-neun heosawon-ieyo.)
남희 (namhui): 아... 오빠는 뭐 하세요? (a... oppa-neun mwo haseyo?)
미선 (miseon): 오빠는 경찰이에요. (oppa-neun gyeongchal-ieyo.)
남희 (namhui): 우와! 경찰이요? 언니는 뭐 하세요? (uwa! gyeongchal-iyo? eonni-neun mwo haseyo?)
미선 (miseon): 언니는 간호사예요. (eonni-neun ganhosa-yeyo.)
남희 (namhui): 간호사요? 우와... 저는 간호사를 정말 좋아해요. 언니 소개해 주세요. (ganhosa-yo? uwa... jeo-neun ganhosa-reul jeongmal joahaeyo. eonni sogae-hae juseyo.)
미선 (miseon): 네??? (ne???)
Seol: 영어로 한 번 더 (yeongeoro han beon deo).
Keith: One more time, with the English.
남희 (namhui): 미선 씨, 어머니는 뭐 하세요? (Miseon ssi, eomeoni-neun mwo haseyo?)
Keith: Miseoun, what does your mother do?
미선 (miseon): 엄마는 주부예요. (eomma-neun jubuyeyo.)
Keith: My mom is a housewife.
남희 (namhui): 아... 아버지는 뭐 하세요? (a... abeoji-neun mwo haseyo?)
Keith: Oh...what does your father do?
미선 (miseon): 아빠는 회사원이에요 (appa-neun heosawon-ieyo.)
Keith: My father is a company employee.
남희 (namhui): 아... 오빠는 뭐 하세요? (a... oppa-neun mwo haseyo?)
Keith: Oh...what does your brother do?
미선 (miseon): 오빠는 경찰이에요. (oppa-neun gyeongchal-ieyo.)
Keith: My brother is a police officer.
남희 (namhui): 우와! 경찰이요? 언니는 뭐 하세요? (uwa! gyeongchal-iyo? eonni-neun mwo haseyo?)
Keith: Wow. He's a policeman? What about your sister?
미선 (miseon): 언니는 간호사예요. (eonni-neun ganhosa-yeyo.)
Keith: My sister is a nurse.
남희 (namhui): 간호사요? 우와... 저는 간호사를 정말 좋아해요. 언니 소개해 주세요. (ganhosa-yo? uwa... jeo-neun ganhosa-reul jeongmal joahaeyo. eonni sogae-hae juseyo.)
Keith: A nurse? Wow...I really like nurses. Please introduce her to me.
미선 (miseon): 네??? (ne???)
Keith: What?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Minkyong: Wow! Miseoun has a very enviable family, at least in Korea it is.
Keith: Why in Korea?
Minkyong: Because when I was in kindergarten, every girl wanted to be a nurse and every boy wanted to be a police officer.
Keith: When I grew up in America, I remember all the little girls around me, they all wanted to be teachers and the boys, they all wanted to be policemen or firemen. Is that the same in Korea?
Minkyong: It’s similar right, nurse, teacher, policeman, fireman.
Keith: Does anyone actually grew up saying, I want to become a shaman.
Minkyong: What! What! That’s what you wanted to be when you are a boy?
Keith: No, well I didn’t want to be a shaman but I found it interesting. I think that’s a very unique job in Korea. I am sure a lot of other countries have this but in Korea, you will find a lot of shamans walk in the streets every day.
Minkyong: Yeah but I never met one so I don’t know.
Keith: Really? Every time I walk down the street in Korea, I get stopped. It's literally like every time and they always say, well there is something wrong with you. You look like you have bad luck or something.
Minkyong: Oh, so they do have power?
Keith: Yeah maybe. Well I guess no one actually grows up saying I want to be a shaman but we just wanted to bring that up because we think that’s a very unique job in Korea.
Minkyong: Umm…
Keith: Okay. Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Keith: All right, Minkyong, help us out. What’s the first word we are going to take a look at?
Minkyong: 주부 (jubu) [natural native speed]
Keith: homemaker, housewife
Minkyong: 주부 (jubu) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 주부 (jubu) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 회사원 (hoesawon) [natural native speed]
Keith: office employee, office worker
Minkyong: 회사원 (hoesawon) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 회사원 (hoesawon) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 경찰 (gyeongchal) [natural native speed]
Keith: police
Minkyong: 경찰 (gyeongchal) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 경찰 (gyeongchal) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 간호사 (ganhosa) [natural native speed]
Keith: nurse
Minkyong: 간호사 (ganhosa) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 간호사 (ganhosa) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 정말 (jeongmal) [natural native speed]
Keith: really, for real
Minkyong: 정말 (jeongmal) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 정말 (jeongmal) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 좋아해요 (joahaeyo). [natural native speed]
Keith: like
Minkyong: 좋아해요 (joahaeyo). [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 좋아해요 (joahaeyo). [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 소개해 주세요 (sogaehae juseyo) [natural native speed]
Keith: Please introduce me.
Minkyong: 소개해 주세요 (sogaehae juseyo) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 소개해 주세요 (sogaehae juseyo) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: Okay. Let’s take a closer look at some of the words and phrases. What’s the first word we are going to take a look at?
Minkyong: 주부 (jubu).
Keith: A homemaker, a housewife and Miseoun’s mother is a homemaker, a housewife. How about her father?
Minkyong: 회사원 (hoesawon). Her father is an office worker and 회사원 (hoesawon) literally means a company employee. If you ask your Korean friends what their fathers do, most of them will tell you that they are 회사원 (hoesawon) because Korean people do not go into details when talking about jobs at first.
Keith: Yeah, and actually that word is all inclusive. It can mean the head of the company, it could also mean the middle of the company, the bottom rung. It’s everything that involves a company. If you work there, you are a
Minkyong: 회사원 (hoesawon).
Keith: But her brother is actually not a 회사원 (hoesawon), right? What does he do?
Minkyong: He is a 경찰 (gyeongchal).
Keith: A police officer and how about his sister?
Minkyong: 간호사 (ganhosa).
Keith: A nurse and we have a lot of words from many different professions. How do we say my sister is a nurse?
Minkyong: 언니는 간호사예요 (eonnineun ganhosayeyo).
Keith: Yeah, that’s right. After the profession or what you do, you can just add 이다 (ida) the verb to be after the profession.
Minkyong: 경찰이에요. (gyeongcharieyo.)
Keith: I am a policeman.
Minkyong: 회사원이에요 (hoesawonieyo).
Keith: I am a company employee.
Minkyong: 주부예요 (jubuyeyo).
Keith: I am a homemaker, I am a housewife. Okay, how about our last phrase, what do we have?
Minkyong: 소개해 주세요 (sogaehae juseyo).
Keith: Please introduce me and can we have a sample sentence with that?
Minkyong: For example, when I am sick and I don’t know any doctors, I could ask somebody 병원 소개해 주세요 (byeongwon sogaehae juseyo).
Keith: Please introduce me to a hospital. Okay, how did it come out in this dialogue?
Minkyong: 언니 소개해 주세요 (eonni sogaehae juseyo).
Keith: Please introduce your sister to me. Okay, how about we move on to the focus of this lesson and 레슨 포커스를 소개해 주세요. (reseun pokeoseureul sogaehae juseyo.)
Minkyong: 네 (ne).

Lesson focus

Minkyong: This lesson's focus is how to ask 'what do you do for a living' 뭐 하세요? (mwo haseyo?)
Keith: 뭐 하세요? (mwo haseyo?) And that literally means "what are you doing?" or "what do you do?" and this can be used to ask what a third person does for a living, too, instead of directly the person you are talking to another person outside the conversation.
Minkyong: And 뭐 (mwo) means "what" and 하세요 (haseyo) is a way of saying that someone does something.
Keith: Yeah. So literally we have what do – what do, what do you do and you can use 뭐 하세요 (mwo haseyo) to ask about someone’s profession especially when you are starting to get to know someone more about a new person or his or her family, you can put a person’s name or title before this expression to show whom you are referring to, who you are asking does what.
Minkyong: For example, 아버지는 뭐 하세요? (abeojineun mwo haseyo?)
Keith: What does your father do?
So what do we have once again, what’s our first part?
Minkyong: 아버지 (abeoji)
Keith: Father and that last phrase that we just went over is
Minkyong: 뭐 하세요? (mwo haseyo?)
Keith: What do? What does your father do?
Minkyong: and you can answer 아버지는 회사원이에요 (abeojineun hoesawonieyo).
Keith: My father is an office worker, or he works for a company. Basically he works for a company. Okay, can we go over how to say some family members, some titles for family members?
Minkyong: First of all, 엄마(eomma), 아빠 (appa)
Keith: Mom and dad.
Minkyong: And if you want to say mother, father, more politely. it's 어머니 (eomeoni), 아버지 (abeoji).
Keith: Ok, how about grandmother and grandfather?
Minkyong: 할머니 (halmeoni), 할아버지 (harabeoji).
Keith: Okay. Now you can check the lesson notes for more words for family names if you are curious about family names and actually, there is a lot of titles for Korean families.
Minkyong: 네, 맞아요 (ne, majayo).
Keith: So it would be good to check out this lesson’s lesson notes. All right, now let’s go over some professions.
Minkyong: 학생 (haksaeng).
Keith: A student and that’s what you are, right?
Minkyong: 네, 학생이에요. (ne, haksaengieyo.)
Keith: But you are also this too.
Minkyong: 선생님 (seonsaengnim).
Keith: A teacher, a Korean teacher right working here at KoreanClass101?
Minkyong: 네, 선생님이에요. (ne, seonsaengnimieyo.)
Keith: Are you our next profession as well?
Minkyong: 요리사 (yorisa).
Keith: A cook.
Minkyong: No, not this one, not this one….
Keith: Not at all….I thought you were multitalented. Well actually Minkyong, you are looking for a profession right now, you are looking for a career. I mean you know right now 지금은 아르바이트지 (jigeumeun areubaiteuji), “it’s a part time job,” right?
Minkyong: 네, 맞아요 (ne, majayo).
Keith: So what’s your future profession?
Minkyong: 음… 회사원? (eum..haksaeng?)
Keith: A company worker, company employee. Well I think that’s about 90% of the Korean population anyway.
Minkyong: Yeah.
Keith: Following soon.

Outro

Keith: All right, well that’s going to do it for this lesson.all right well, hope everyone listens into our next series.
Minkyong: 네, 다음 주에 뵐게요. (ne, daeum jue boelgeyo.)
Keith: Yeah. See you everyone next week, bye-bye.
Minkyong: Bye.

Grammar

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34 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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"Now you've learned how to say a profession in Korean. What job names would you like to know in Korean?" :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 05:47 AM
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Hi 단,


Thanks for posting. 'Is a police officer' is written as '경찰이다', and to make it polite, it becomes -->'경찰이에요'

Remember, for words that end with vowels you use 예요, and for words that end with consonants 이에요.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Friday at 08:45 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

안녕하새요!

I want to know why this sentence 경찰이요? adds 이 after 경찰?

Shouldn't it be just 경찰요? or 경찰이예요?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 07:11 AM
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Hi Sophia,


Thank you for commenting. While there are lessons you have to pay for, there are also many free lessons available on our website--you get access to the first three lessons for every series (and we have quite a bit), and access to newly updated lessons (when they have been updated). So please try to make use of the lessons available!


Sincerely,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Sophia
Wednesday at 08:38 AM
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I wish its free for me :(

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 02:18 PM
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Hi Gregoire,


When you first introduce someone, you need to be specific about who this person is, and you use i/ga. Afterward you use eun/neun.


Example: This is my mom: (이 분이) 제 어머니세요. -->first introduction, so 'i'

제 어머니는 주부세요. -->My mom is a housewife. -->already know whose mom, so we use 'neun'.


Hi Patricie,


Thanks for posting. Some ways to say the phrases would be:


"What goes around, comes around." -->주는대로 받는다./뿌린대로 거둔다.


"You get what you think about." --->생각한대로 받게 된다.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Patricie
Thursday at 02:18 AM
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Hallo there!


I've been learning with you for a couple of months now, but still I'm not able to translate this:


"What goes around, comes around."

and

"You get what you think about."


Can you please help me out with the translation?

Thank you a lot.


Patricie

Gregoire
Sunday at 11:12 AM
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For Lyn,


I thought introducing the mum entailed saying "eomeoniga" or "eommaga" first then say "eomonineun" or "eommaneun" later.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:23 PM
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Hi Gregoire,


Thanks for posting. As they already introduced 'mom' in sentence, she is referred to more 'generally', which is why 은/는 was used.

As for the sister, Miseon has a sister (who is a nurse) so you can see that there is one son and two daughters mentioned in this family.


Hope this was of help.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Gregoire
Sunday at 07:39 AM
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Under "VOCAB PHRASE AND USAGE."


Keith: But her brother is actually not a 회사원, right? What does he do?

Minkyong: He is a 경찰.

Keith: A police officer and how about his sister? ***>(her sister/sister of Miseon)

Gregoire
Sunday at 03:56 AM
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6/13/20


Does the ~i/~ga vs. ~eun/~neun rule still apply in conversations or more with formal writing/essays?


Just when I thought I was getting it, I noticed in the dialogue, i or ga was not used at all. Right away, eun or neun.


"A: Miseon ssi, eomeoni-neun mwo haseyo?


B: eomma-neun jubuyeyo.


A: a... abeoji-neun mwo haseyo?


B: appa-neun heosawon-ieyo."