Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Matt: Extra Particles, Part 2. Matt Here.
Kyejin: 안녕하세요. I'm Kyejin. In this lesson, you’ll learn about the extra particles, 대로, and 는데.
Matt: The conversation takes place in a park.
Kyejin: It’s between Gwanghyun and Jeong-eun.
Matt: The speakers are not familiar with each other, so they’ll be using formal Korean. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

광현: 제가 지금 타고 있는 모습 그대로 타 보세요.
정은: 하려고 하는데 자전거가 고장났나 봐요. 잘 안 돼요.
광현: 그래요? 제가 한번 볼게요. 흠...고장난 게 아니라 브레이크를 잡아서 안 됐어요.
정은: 아.. 그래요?
광현: 괜찮아요. 다시 한 번 제가 보여준 대로 타보세요.
Matt: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
광현: 제가 지금 타고 있는 모습 그대로 타 보세요.
정은: 하려고 하는데 자전거가 고장났나 봐요. 잘 안 돼요.
광현: 그래요? 제가 한번 볼게요. 흠...고장난 게 아니라 브레이크를 잡아서 안 됐어요.
정은: 아.. 그래요?
광현: 괜찮아요. 다시 한 번 제가 보여준 대로 타보세요.
Matt: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Gwanghyun: Try to ride it as I am riding right now.
Jeong-eun: I’m trying to but it seems like the bike is broken. It’s not working well.
Gwanghyun: Really? Then I’ll take a look at it. It’s not broken - you were just holding the brakes.
Jeong-eun: Ah… is that so?
Gwanghyun: It’s okay. Just try to ride it one more time like I showed you.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Matt: Sometimes in Korean dramas, I've seen people riding bikes near the Han river. Is that common?
Kyejin: Well, it really depends on where you live, but usually, there are a lot of people doing that.
Matt: I like that there are bike tracks along the running tracks around the river, so you can start riding a bike from the east side of the South Seoul area, to the west, or vice-versa.
Kyejin: I like that too. Also, if you get hungry, you can easily grab a snack at a convenience store or stall in the river parks.
Matt: And it’s interesting that recently, more Korean people have started riding bikes to work.
Kyejin: That’s right. But riding a bike is not easy in Seoul, because there are hills almost everywhere, and drivers usually don’t yield to cyclists. But many people are still trying to use bikes in their daily lives.
VOCAB LIST
Matt: Okay, let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Kyejin: 타다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to ride
Kyejin: 타다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 타다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 모습 [natural native speed]
Matt: looks, figure, shape
Kyejin: 모습[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 모습 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 그대로 [natural native speed]
Matt: as it is, intact
Kyejin: 그대로[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 그대로 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 고장나다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to be broken
Kyejin: 고장나다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 고장나다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 자전거 [natural native speed]
Matt: bicycle
Kyejin: 자전거[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 자전거 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 브레이크를 잡다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to grab the brake
Kyejin: 브레이크를 잡다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 브레이크를 잡다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 다시 한 번 [natural native speed]
Matt: once more, one more time
Kyejin: 다시 한 번[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 다시 한 번 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 보여주다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to give a chance to see
Kyejin: 보여주다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 보여주다 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Matt: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Kyejin: 고장나다
Matt: meaning "to be broken".
Kyejin: The noun 고장 (gojang) means “trouble” or “breakdown" and the verb 나다 (nada) means "to occur” or “to come out".
Matt: Together, they convey the meaning that an object has broken or has a defect.
Kyejin: This can be used with any type of machine or device, for example, 컴퓨터가 고장나서 사용할 수 없어요. (keompyuteoga gojangnaseo sayonghal su eopseoyo.
Matt: Which means "The computer is broken so it cannot be used.” Or with a cellphone, you can say..
Kyejin: 핸드폰이 고장나서 사용할 수 없어요. (haendeuponi gojangnaseo sayonghal su eopseoyo.
Matt: Or you can also say..
Kyejin: .. 핸드폰이 고장났나봐요.
Matt: ..which means "It seems my cellphone is broken." Okay, what's the next word?
Kyejin: It’s 그대로
Matt: meaning "as it is, intact"
Kyejin: 그 (geu) is the pronoun that means "that", and 대로 (daero) means "like, as is". Together these convey the meaning "as it is".
Matt: The same pattern can be used to mean “as this is” with different pronouns, right?
Kyejin: That’s right. Using the pronoun 이 meaning “this”, you can say 이대로 to mean “as this” or “as this is.”
Matt: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kyejin: Sure. For example, you can say.. 그대로 있어보세요.
Matt: .. which means "Try to stay as you are." Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Matt: In this lesson, you'll learn three extra particles...
Kyejin: Which are 대로, 는데.
Matt: Let’s take a look at the first particle.
Kyejin: 대로
Matt: It means something like "as...", as we learned in the previous section
Kyejin: When you use it with a noun or pronoun, you can simply add it then add this particle. For example, 계획대로.
Matt: “like the plan.”
Kyejin: 계획 is the noun meaning “a plan” or “the plan”, then 대로 means “as”.
Matt: What about “like the promise”?
Kyejin: 약속대로. 약속 is the word meaning “promise.” Using it in a sentence you could say, 약속대로 했어 meaning “I did as I promised.”
Matt: And we can say “by the law” using this particle, right?
Kyejin: Yes, that would be 법대로. This can be translated as “by the law” but literally means “as the law” or “as written in the law.”
Matt: Koreans use it when they’re arguing, right?
Kyejin: That’s right. When both sides are getting emotional, we just say 법대로 하자 to mean “Let’s do it by the law.”
Matt: And what about “as usual”?
Kyejin: 평소대로. 평소 is the word meaning “usual.”
Matt: Okay. And this particle can be used with a verb too. How can we use it?
Kyejin: It’s simple. You can simply add ㄴ(니은) or 는 between a verb-stem and the particle 대로. For example, with the verb 말하다, meaning “to speak”, you can say the verb-stem 말하, then ㄴ(니은), then the particle 대로. 말한대로.
Matt: Which means “As I speak.” And I think you need to choose the right syllable before the particle depending on how the verb-stem ends, right?
Kyejin: That’s right. When the verb-stem ends in a vowel, like 말하 of 말하다, you can use the 니은. Otherwise, you can use the word 는, as in 먹는대로.
Matt: Which means “As I eat.” Then how would you say “As planned” or “as we planned”?
Kyejin: 계획하다 is the verb meaning “to plan” and its verb-stem is 계획하. The verb-stem ends in a vowel, so you can say 계획한 대로. by putting the consonant ㄴ in between.
Matt: Okay. And now we have the next particle, which is..
Kyejin: 는데.
Matt: You can use this particle when you want to express the speaker's astonishment, exclamation, bewilderment, surprise or interest.
Kyejin: For example, 맛있다 is the word that means “delicious.” If you express your own exclamation, you can add the particle 는데 to the verb-stem 맛있, and say 맛있는데.
Matt: Which means “How delicious it is.”
Kyejin: When you write a sentence that ends with the particle 는데, you usually put the exclamation mark.
Matt: Depending on its verb-stem, the particle changes its form, so be sure to check the lesson notes to learn more about them listeners. Kyejin, can you give us another example?
Kyejin: Sure. When you want to express delight about Korea and how good the country is.. you can say 한국 참 좋은데!
Matt: “Korea is quite good!”

Outro

Matt: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kyejin: 안녕히 계세요.

7 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What's your impression of Han River?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 08:07 AM
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안녕하세요 robert groulx,


You are very welcome. 😇

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

레벤테 (Levente)

Team KoreanClass101.com

robert groulx
Monday at 06:27 AM
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thank you for the lesson


my favorite is 한국 참 좋은데!


robert

KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 06:48 AM
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Hi Sebastian,


Thanks for posting. When ~는데 is used to connect two sentences, it takes on the role of a connective particle. However, when it is used at the end of a sentence, it is used to to stress a fact that the speaker had not really known. Some examples:


밥을 먹기 싫은데 억지로 먹었어요. I didn't want to eat, but I forced myself to eat.


먹기 싫은데!-->(I don't want to eat! -->used to stress that you do not want to eat).


A: 밥 먹어! (Eat your food!)

B: 먹고 있는데? (I *am* eating!)


Hope this made some sense.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Sebastian
Friday at 04:50 PM
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Hi


~는데 seems to have a completely different explanation on this website:

https://www.howtostudykorean.com/upper-intermediate-korean-grammar/unit-4-lessons-76-83/lesson-76/


There they say that it is generally used to connect two sentences that could also stand seperately on their own. And that it sometimes means "even though", but weakly.


In your lesson, you say that it is used as an exclamation, which is not even mentioned on that website at all. Sure, you both say it is a very hard to explain grammatical construct, but it really confuses me that you say something completely different ;)


Can you clarify this?

KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 10:53 AM
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Hi Jim,


Thank you for posting.

The English translation says "bike," which is interchangeable with bicycle. :)


Regards,

Claire

Team KoreanClass101.com

Jim Stanfill
Thursday at 12:41 AM
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In the line-by-line dialog, the English translation does not seem to accurately reflect the Hangul, e.g., "bicycle" is in the Hangul, but not in the English translation.