Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Matt: Hi everyone, and welcome back to KoreanClass101.com. This is Korean Particles Season 1 Lesson 17 - Negative Feeling Particles. Matt here.
Kyejin: 안녕하세요. I'm Kyejin.
Matt: In this lesson, you’ll learn particles that add a negative feeling.
Kyejin: such as.. 느니, 조차 and 는커녕.
Matt: This conversation takes place at a friend's house.
Kyejin: It’s between Inguk and Yeji.
Matt: The speakers are friends, so they’ll be using informal Korean. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

예지: 인국아, 어제 집에 잘 들어갔어?
인국: 아니, 버스를 잘못 타서 한 새벽 세 시에 도착했어.
예지: 어머, 그러면 부모님은 많이 화가 나셨겠네.
인국: 엄마는 화를 내시기는커녕 내가 다치지 않아서 안심하셨어.
예지: 잘 됐네. 아버님은? 아버님이 엄격하시다고 언제나 이야기했잖아.
인국: 아버지 얼굴을 보는 것조차 힘들었으니까. 나중에 이야기해야지.
Matt: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
예지: 인국아, 어제 집에 잘 들어갔어?
인국: 아니, 버스를 잘못 타서 한 새벽 세 시에 도착했어.
예지: 어머, 그러면 부모님은 많이 화가 나셨겠네.
인국: 엄마는 화를 내시기는커녕 내가 다치지 않아서 안심하셨어.
예지: 잘 됐네. 아버님은? 아버님이 엄격하시다고 언제나 이야기했잖아.
인국: 아버지 얼굴을 보는 것조차 힘들었으니까. 나중에 이야기해야지.
Matt: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Yeji: Hey Inguk, did you make it home alright yesterday?
Inguk: Not really, I took the wrong bus and ended up getting home at three o’clock in the morning.
Yeji: Oh no, then your parents must have been very upset.
Inguk: Far from being upset, my mother was just relieved I wasn’t hurt.
Yeji: That’s good. What about your father? You’re always saying how he’s so strict.
Inguk: I couldn't even face him. I'll talk to him later.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Matt: Kyejin, in the dialogue, Inguk said that he got home at three in the morning by bus. Don’t buses stop operating pretty early in Korea? How did he get home at 3?
Kyejin: Well, In 2014, Seoul city launched a night bus system. You need to pay extra to ride the bus, but you can go anywhere in Seoul even at three a.m.
Matt: So buses run 24/7 in Seoul. That’s amazing! Seoul is known for having one of the most efficient and reasonably priced transport systems in the world.
Kyejin: right, most cities in South Korea are connected by subway and train.
Matt: And an intricate intercity bus system is used for cities outside of the Seoul metropolitan area. I was really surprised to hear that you can change between buses and the subway for free if you transfer within thirty minutes, and you can transfer up to five times.
Kyejin: And they have English announcements, so you shouldn’t get lost in the city either.
Matt: That’s good to know. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Matt: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Kyejin: 들어가다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to enter, to go into
Kyejin: 들어가다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 들어가다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 타다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to ride
Kyejin: 타다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 타다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 새벽 [natural native speed]
Matt: early morning, dawn
Kyejin: 새벽[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 새벽 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 도착하다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to arrive
Kyejin: 도착하다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 도착하다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 어머 [natural native speed]
Matt: oh my, oh dear
Kyejin: 어머[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 어머 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 화가 나다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to get upset (Literally meaning “anger rises up”)
Kyejin: 화가 나다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 화가 나다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 안심하다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to relax, to feel relaxed
Kyejin: 안심하다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 안심하다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 잘 돼다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to go well
Kyejin: 잘 돼다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 잘 돼다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 조차 [natural native speed]
Matt: even
Kyejin: 조차[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 조차 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 엄격하다 [natural native speed]
Matt: strict, stern
Kyejin: 엄격하다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 엄격하다 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Matt: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Kyejin: 안심하다
Matt: meaning "to relax, to feel relaxed." Can you break down this word, Kyejin?
Kyejin: Sure. The verb 안심하다 comes from the Chinese character 안 ..
Matt: which means “calm” or “peace," ..
Kyejin: ..and 심
Matt: which means "mind," "heart," or "feelings."
Kyejin: All together 안심 means “relaxation” and you can use this noun with the verb 하다 to mean “to relax” or “to feel relaxed.”
Matt: This verb can be used to express relief or comfort in a situation or circumstance. Can you give us an example?
Kyejin: Sure. For example, you can say 기말고사 다 끝나니까 안심되네요.
Matt: ..which means "I'm very relaxed now that finals have ended." What's the next word?
Kyejin: 잘 됐네
Matt: which means "that went well" or “that’s great” to express a mutual feeling of excitement. It’s an expression that means "that turned out great."
Kyejin: 잘 is an adverb meaning “very well” and 되다 is a verb meaning “to become”, so 잘 됐네 literally means “It became well.”
Matt: It can be a reaction after hearing good news or positive information. For example, a friend may say..
Kyejin: 오늘 드디어 운전면허증을 땄어! ..
Matt: which means "I finally received my driver’s licence today!"
Kyejin: And you could answer 잘 됐네! to share your friend’s excitement.
Matt: Okay, what's the next word?
Kyejin: 어머
Matt: Which means something like "oh my,” or “oh dear". It’s a colloquial expression used to express astonishment or disbelief about a situation. It’s similar to “oh my God” in English. But listeners, note that this phrase is mostly used by female speakers. Kyejin, what do men usually say?
Kyejin: If you’re a man, you can say 이런 to express astonishment.
Matt: Can you give us an example using this word?
Kyejin: Sure. For example, you can say.. 어머! 누가 우리집에 쳐들어왔어?
Matt: .. which means "Oh my! Did someone come into our house?" Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Matt: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use particles that express negative feelings.
Kyejin: In Korean, we have 느니, 조차 and 는커녕.
Matt: Okay, let’s take a look at the first particle, which is..
Kyejin: 느니.
Matt: When you’re talking about something that you don’t particularly feel like doing, or something that you’d rather not do because it doesn’t sound like the best idea, you can use this particle.
Kyejin: Exactly. -느니 after a verb-stem. You add -느니 after what you don’t want to do, and then say what you’d rather do after that.
Matt: For example, if you want to say “rather than going..,” you can say..
Kyejin: 가느니. First, I picked the verb 가다 meaning “to go,” and took out the verb-stem 가. Then I added the particle 느니. 가/ 느니.
Matt: You can use this same particle even when a verb-stem ends in a consonant.
Kyejin: yes, 먹다 is the verb meaning “to eat” and its verb-stem is 먹 which ends in a consonant. But you can just add 느니 to the verb-stem to mean “rather than eating.” 먹느니.
Matt: Can you give us some sentences?
Kyejin: Sure. 지금 집에 가느니, 여기서 잘게요.
Matt: It means "Rather than going home now, I’ll just sleep here."
Kyejin: 나중에 후회하느니, 지금 가 보고 싶어요.
Matt: “Rather than regretting it later, I want to go see it now.”
Kyejin: Here I added the particle 느니 to the verb-stem 후회하-, which means “to regret.”
Matt: Okay, what’s the second particle?
Kyejin: Next we have.. 조차 which means “even.”
Matt: If someone with excellent skills can’t do some task related to his or her talents, you can use this phrase meaning “even he is not” or “even he cannot.”
Kyejin: It’s simple to use. You just need to pick a noun and add the particle 조차.
Matt: For example, when even a doctor can’t cure someone, you can say..
Kyejin: 의사조차. 의사 is the word meaning “doctor” and 조차 is the particle meaning “even.” All together, it means “even doctors.”
Matt: So in a sentence, you can use it as..
Kyejin: 의사조차 고칠 수가 없다.
Matt: "Even doctors can’t cure it."
Kyejin: This particle usually goes with the word ㄹ수가 or 할 수가 which means “to be able to,” as you can hear in this sentence. 고칠 수가 없다.
Matt: Okay, we have one more particle, which is..
Kyejin: 은 커녕
Matt: meaning “let alone” or “not even that.”
Kyejin: There is another word, 는 커녕 that means the same.
Matt: These particles negate the noun or verb that they follow, and lead to revealing another fact by comparing the noun or verb with another one.
Kyejin: -는커녕 or 은커녕 follow a noun. So if you want to compare verbs, a verb has to be in its noun form with the particle -기, such as 먹기, 가기. meaning “eating” and “going.”
Matt: Can you give us an example? How can we say “not even rice” in Korean?
Kyejin: First, you can say the noun 밥 meaning “rice”, then add the particle 은커녕. When a noun ends in a consonant, you can use the particle 은커녕.
Matt: So “not even rice” in Korean will be..
Kyejin: 밥은커녕.
Matt: What if a noun ends in a vowel?
Kyejin: Then you can use 는커녕, as in 일본어는커녕.
Matt: which means “not even Japanese.” And this particle can work with verbs, right?
Kyejin: That’s right. But in that case, you need to turn them into a noun by adding 기 to the verb-stem. For example, 먹다, the verb meaning “to eat,” should be conjugated as 먹기 meaning “eating.” I added the particle 기 to the verb-stem which makes a verb into a noun.
Matt: So “not even playing” in Korean will be..
Kyejin: 먹기는커녕.
Matt: Can you give us a sentence?
Kyejin: Sure. For example, you can say.. 요즘은 공부는커녕 신문도 못 읽어요.
Matt: “I can't even read newspapers, let alone study.” Listeners, make sure to check the PDF lesson notes for more examples.

Outro

Matt: Well, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kyejin: 안녕히 계세요.

10 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Which transportation method do you like the most?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 10:06 AM
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안녕하세요 robert groulx,


You are very welcome. 😇

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

레벤테 (Levente)

Team KoreanClass101.com

robert groulx
Thursday at 06:45 AM
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thank you for the elsson


my favorite is 의사조차 고칠 수가 없다.


robert

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:23 PM
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Hi Pauline,


Thanks for posting. 화를 내시기는커녕 is a very polite phrase used when referring to someone who is your senior, so the original format would be 화를 내시다(someone your senior is angry). When you are referring to yourself, you use 화를 내시기는커녕.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Pauline
Wednesday at 04:18 AM
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hello, can you pls explain the construction of 화를 내시기는커녕. According to the rule if I understand correctly isn't it 화가 나기는커녕?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 02:06 PM
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Hi Aia,


Thanks for posting, great job! Keep it up!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Aia
Sunday at 01:35 AM
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걷느니 차라리 버스를 타고 갈거예요.

숙제를 하느니 티비를 볼래요.

아예 안 가느니 혼자 가겠어요.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:55 AM
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Hi Little Finger,


Thanks for your comment.

We have corrected the issue.


감사합니다.

클레어

Team KoreanClass101.com

Little Finger
Friday at 06:31 PM
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sub

Little Finger
Friday at 05:30 PM
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Typo on page 8 of PDF notes:


오다 + -기는커녕 = 놀기는커녕


should be:


오다 + -기는커녕 = 오기는커녕