Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Matt: Quotation Particles. Matt Here.
Kyejin: 안녕하세요. And I'm Kyejin.
Matt: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use quotation particles. The conversation takes place at a friend’s house.
Kyejin: It's between Danbi and Jooyeong.
Matt: The speakers are friends; so they’ll be using informal Korean. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

주영: 단비야, 혹시 내 운동화를 못 봤어?
단비: 응, 현관 앞에 두고 왔어.
주영: 뭐라고? 현관 앞에 두고 왔다고?
단비: 맞아. 내가 전에 집 안에서 신발을 신고 다니면 안 된다고 했잖아.
주영: 내 운동화는 깨끗하다고 했잖아. 깨끗하면 괜찮지 않아?
단비: 난 분명히 아니라고 했어. 우리 집에서 지켜야 하는 규칙 중 하나야.
Matt: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
주영: 단비야, 혹시 내 운동화를 못 봤어?
단비: 응, 현관 앞에 두고 왔어.
주영: 뭐라고? 현관 앞에 두고 왔다고?
단비: 맞아. 내가 전에 집 안에서 신발을 신고 다니면 안 된다고 했잖아.
주영: 내 운동화는 깨끗하다고 했잖아. 깨끗하면 괜찮지 않아?
단비: 난 분명히 아니라고 했어. 우리 집에서 지켜야 하는 규칙 중 하나야.
Matt: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Jooyeong: Hey Danbi, have you seen my sneakers?
Danbi: Yeah, I put them in front of the door.
Jooyeong: What? You put them in front of the door?
Danbi: Yeah. I told you earlier that you’re not supposed to wear shoes in the house.
Jooyeong: I told you my sneakers are clean. If they’re clean isn't it okay?
Danbi: I told you no for sure. It is one of our house rules that you have to follow.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Matt: It seems like he forgot about Korea’s No Shoe Rule!
Kyejin: Yes, and that’s an important rule. In almost every home in South Korea, it is expected that people will remove their shoes before going inside.
Matt: I think this is mostly because Koreans spend a large amount of time sitting and sleeping on the floor, right?
Kyejin: That’s right. The floor is not only for walking around on, but also where people sleep. That’s why there is 온돌 (ondol), which is an underfloor heating system in Korea even in modern buildings.
Matt: So if you step into someone’s house in shoes, it’s almost like walking on someone’s bed in shoes.
Kyejin: Exactly. So listeners, when you visit someone’s house in Korea, make sure you take off your shoes, even if there are carpets on the floor.
Matt: That’s a good tip. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Matt: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Kyejin: 혹시 [natural native speed]
Matt: by any chance, perhaps
Kyejin: 혹시[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 혹시 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 운동화 [natural native speed]
Matt: sneakers
Kyejin: 운동화[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 운동화 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 현관 [natural native speed]
Matt: entrance
Kyejin: 현관[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 현관 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 앞 [natural native speed]
Matt: front
Kyejin: 앞[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 앞 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 두다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to have, to keep (someone)
Kyejin: 두다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 두다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 안 되다 [natural native speed]
Matt: shouldn't
Kyejin: 안 되다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 안 되다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 신발 [natural native speed]
Matt: shoes
Kyejin: 신발[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 신발 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 지키다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to protect, to abide by (rules)
Kyejin: 지키다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 지키다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 깨끗하다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to be clean
Kyejin: 깨끗하다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 깨끗하다 [natural native speed]
Matt: And last we have..
Kyejin: 규칙 [natural native speed]
Matt: rule, principle
Kyejin: 규칙[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 규칙 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Matt: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Kyejin: 두고 오다
Matt: meaning "to leave” or “to mislay". Kyejin, can you break down this verb?
Kyejin: Sure. 두고 오다 (dugo oda) is made up of the verb 두다 duda, which means "to place something" or "to set an object somewhere," and the verb 오다 oda, which means “to come.”
Matt: That’s why the literal translation of this verb becomes ”to set and come back" or “to leave and come back.” You can use this verb in situations where an object is placed or mistakenly left behind in an area separate from the speaker. Can you give us an example?
Kyejin: For example, when you leave your umbrella at home and come to school, you can say 집에 우산을 두고 왔어요
Matt: which means, "I left my umbrella at home." Like in this situation, you can use this verb to imply accidentally or willingly leaving an object behind.
Matt: Okay, what's the next word?
Kyejin: 지키다
Matt: meaning "to protect, to abide by the rules” The meaning of this verb can change depending on the context of a sentence. In the phrase..
Kyejin: 약속을 지키다 (yaksogeul jikida),
Matt: ..which means "to keep a promise," it takes on the meaning of "to keep." While in the phrase ..
Kyejin: 규칙을 지키다 (gyuchigeul jikida)..
Matt: which means "to obey the rules," it is understood as "to obey."
Kyejin: But in general, you can use this verb to mean “to keep something set.” when talking about promises or rules.
Matt: In the other context, it also means “to protect”. For example..
Kyejin: 사랑하는 사람을 지키다.
Matt: which literally means “to protect someone whom you love.” Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Matt: In this lesson, you'll learn how to use quotation particles.
Kyejin: In Korean, we have -다고 and -라고 in this group.
Matt: Let’s learn about the first one..
Kyejin: -다고.
Matt: It works like “That” for making a quotation in English. For example, , "I heard THAT..." as in "I heard THAT it was nice," or "I said THAT..." as in “I said THAT you cannot eat this food here.”
Kyejin: And.. when the verb-stem ends in a vowel, you can add the batchim ㄴ (니은) between the verb-stem and the particle 다고.
Matt: And.. when the verb-stem ends in a consonant, you can use..
Kyejin: 는. So it becomes 는다고.
Matt: Okay, let’s take a look at some examples. How would you say “I heard that you’ll buy a house.”?
Kyejin: First, you need to make a sentence to be quoted. In this case, “You’ll buy a house” is the one that I need to quote.
Matt: Before you make a sentence, listeners, note that in Korean, you can use only past or present tense. For the thing to be happening you need to keep the present tense, when the information is quoted. So the sentence will be ...
Kyejin: 너가 집을 사다.
Matt: You buy a house.
Kyejin: 사다 is the verb meaning “to buy” and its verb-stem ends in a vowel. So you need to put the batchim ㄴ (니은) then 다고.
Matt: So it becomes..
Kyejin: 너가 집을 산다고.
Matt: Then, you can say “I heard.”
Kyejin: That’s right. “너가 집을 산다고" is the story that I heard, so it should be placed between 나는 meaning “I” and 들었다 “heard.”
Matt: So the full sentence will be..
Kyejin: 나는 너가 집을 산다고 들었다.
Matt: meaning “I heard that you’ll buy a house.” And it’s not just for situations where you heard something, you can also use this structure to talk about what you said.
Kyejin: That’s right. For example, 나는 너가 집을 산다고 말했다.
Matt: I said that you will buy a house.
Kyejin: And for many cases, we use the verb 했다. to mean “I said that.”, although its literal meaning is “I did that.”
Matt: Can you give us an example?
Kyejin: Sure. 나는 도움이 필요하다고 했다.
Matt: meaning “I said I need some help.” This form can be used with any verb, except for...
Kyejin: 이다 meaning “to exist” and 아니다. “not to exist.” In that case, you need to use this form. Verb-stem, plus 라고.
Matt: Can you give us an example?
Kyejin: Sure. 이것은 사과가 아니다 is the sentence meaning “It’s not an apple.” It ends with the verb 아니다. So you need to add 라고 to the verb-stem so it becomes 아니라고.
Matt: So the sentence will become..
Kyejin: 이것은 사과가 아니라고. Then, you can say 했다. meaning “I said.” 이것은 사과가 아니라고 했다.
Matt: meaning “I said that it’s not an apple.” Since there are multiple steps to make the full sentence here, the lesson notes will help you understand it more clearly, listeners. So make sure to check them!

Outro

Matt: Well, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kyejin: 안녕히 계세요.

18 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Have you ever tried Ondol?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 09:32 PM
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Hello 제시카,


Thanks for posting. You got the right sentence!

(으)ㄴ 적이 있다 is a grammar that you should use for 'have tried'.


Keep up the good work!


Kind regards,

Hyeon Yeong Seo

Team KoreanClass101.com

제시카
Wednesday at 12:04 PM
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안녕하세요?


네, 저는 한국 식당에서 온돌을 한 적이 있습니다. (how would you say, "have tried?")


감사합니다,

제시카

Cecilia
Friday at 10:25 AM
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Hi there!


비터 씨는 자동차를 팔다고 들었어요.


If I want to say "I heard that peter has sold his car.", is that right?


How about if I want to say "I heard that peter is selling his car."? Do I need to change 팔다고 into progressive tense?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:26 AM
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안녕하세요 robert groulx,


You are very welcome. 😇

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

레벤테 (Levente)

Team KoreanClass101.com

robert groulx
Sunday at 12:46 AM
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thank you for the lesson


-다고


no , i did not try fried ordol


robert

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:49 PM
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Hi Aia,


Thanks for posting. Ondol is the best on winter days!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Aia
Monday at 06:03 AM
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계진에게서 온돌이 무엇인지 들있어요

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:21 PM
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Hi 성연,


Thanks for posting. To answer your question, '~ㄴ/는다고' is used when quoting things in Korean. So if you ask, '먹는다고 했어요?", you're inquiring quoting what the other person said.


Hope this was of help!


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

성연
Saturday at 02:45 PM
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Hello again!


Sorry but please ignore the first question. I realised that its an adjective not a verb!


Thanks!

성연
Friday at 11:03 PM
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Hello!


I have two questions.


Firstly, in the lesson notes, there is this example sentence "도움이 필요하다고 했어요". However, should it be "필요한다고" instead?


Secondly, to mean "I said that I eat ...", would "... 먹는다고 했어요" be correct or is it "... 먹다고 했어요"? In general for verb stems ending in consonants in present tense, would it be right to use the formal non-polite 는다 form of the verb before adding 고?