Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Miseon: 안녕하세요! 안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo! annyeonghaseyo), KoreanClass101.com. Miseon입니다 (imnida).
Keith: And I am Keith, welcome to newbie series season 4, lesson 6; “Did You Already Spend All Your Spending Money in Korea”
Miseon: 안녕하세요 여러분 (annyeonghaseyo yeoreobun). I am Miseon, and welcome to koreanclass101.com.
Keith: With us, you’ll learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Miseon: Yes, we also provide you with culture insights.
Keith: And tips you won’t find in a textbook.
Okay, Miseon-ssi What are we going to learn in this lesson?
Miseon: This lesson we’ll learn the expression related to pocket money 용돈 (yongdon), and also practice the past tense.
Keith: Okay, that sounds good. 용돈 (yongdon), I always love that word. And where does this word take place?
Miseon: At home, 집 (jip).
Keith: And the conversation is between:
Miseon: Minjeong and her father.
Keith: So the speakers are family, father, right?
Miseon: 네 (ne), and Minjeong is using intimate language to her father.
Keith: Attention listeners, comment.
Miseon: Comment.
Keith: And, comment some more.
Miseon: It’s easy.
Keith: And asking questions really helps improve progress. Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
민정 (minjeong): 아빠. 피곤해? (appa. pigonhae?)
아빠 (appa): 왜? 괜찮아. (wae? gwaenchana.)
민정 (minjeong): 아빠. 안마해 줄까? (appa. anmahae julkka?)
아빠 (appa): 괜찮아. 잠깐, 너... 용돈 다 썼어? (gwaenchana. jamkkan, neo... yongdon da sseosseo?)
민정 (minjeong): 아... 아니... 응. (a... ani... eung.)
아빠 (appa): 벌써? 벌써 다 썼어? (beolsseo? beolsseo da sseosseo?)
민정 (minjeong): 응... 용돈 다 썼어. 아빠. 나 벌써 중학생이야. 용돈 더 줘. (appa. na beolsseo jung-haksaeng-iya. yongdon deo jwo.)
아빠 (appa): 니가 벌써 중학생이야? (niga beolsseo junghaksaengiya?)
민정 (minjeong): 어? 아빠, 몰랐어? (eo? appa, mollasseo?)
Miseon: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
민정 (minjeong): 아빠. 피곤해? (appa. pigonhae?)
아빠 (appa): 왜? 괜찮아. (wae? gwaenchana.)
민정 (minjeong): 아빠. 안마해 줄까? (appa. anmahae julkka?)
아빠 (appa): 괜찮아. 잠깐, 너... 용돈 다 썼어? (gwaenchana. jamkkan, neo... yongdon da sseosseo?)
민정 (minjeong): 아... 아니... 응. (a... ani... eung.)
아빠 (appa): 벌써? 벌써 다 썼어? (beolsseo? beolsseo da sseosseo?)
민정 (minjeong): 응... 용돈 다 썼어. 아빠. 나 벌써 중학생이야. 용돈 더 줘. (appa. na beolsseo jung-haksaeng-iya. yongdon deo jwo.)
아빠 (appa): 니가 벌써 중학생이야? (niga beolsseo junghaksaengiya?)
민정 (minjeong): 어? 아빠, 몰랐어? (eo? appa, mollasseo?)
Miseon: 영어로 한번더. (yeongeoro hanbeondeo.)
Keith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
민정 (minjeong): 아빠. 피곤해? (appa. pigonhae?)
Keith: Dad, are you tired?
아빠 (appa): 왜? 괜찮아. (wae? gwaenchana.)
Keith: Why? I'm all right.
민정 (minjeong): 아빠. 안마해 줄까? (appa. anmahae julkka?)
Keith: Dad, do you want a massage?
아빠 (appa): 괜찮아. 잠깐, 너... 용돈 다 썼어? (gwaenchana. jamkkan, neo... yongdon da sseosseo?)
Keith: I'm all right. Wait. Did you use all your spending money?
민정 (minjeong): 아... 아니... 응. (a... ani... eung.)
Keith: Oh, no...yes.
아빠 (appa): 벌써? 벌써 다 썼어? (beolsseo? beolsseo da sseosseo?)
Keith: Already? You already used it all?
민정 (minjeong): 응... 용돈 다 썼어. 아빠. 나 벌써 중학생이야. 용돈 더 줘. (appa. na beolsseo jung-haksaeng-iya. yongdon deo jwo.)
Keith: Yeah...I used all my spending money. Dad, I'm already a middle school student. Give me some more spending money.
아빠 (appa): 니가 벌써 중학생이야? (niga beolsseo junghaksaengiya?)
Keith: You're already a middle school student?
민정 (minjeong): 어? 아빠, 몰랐어? (eo? appa, mollasseo?)
Keith: Huh? Dad, you didn't know?
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Miseon: Oh my god, The dialogue is sad. Father didn’t know that Minjeong is already a middle school student. Oh god.
Keith: Miseon-ssi.
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: What do you do, Miseon-ssi, we have a sense of humour here in koreanclass101.com.
Miseon: Uh, Okay.
Keith: But if it’s real life, Yeah, very sad.
Miseon: Right.
Keith: But Miseon-ssi, just like in this dialogue, what did you say to your parents, when you ran out of 용돈 (yongdon) when you ran out of your allowance, your pocket money, when you were a kid?
Miseon: Oh my god. It was very similar like Minjeong did. But I used to pluck my father’s … my dad’s grey hair.
Keith: Uh, Okay.
Miseon: Yeah, so if I can pluck like a hundred. That’s a lot, right?
Keith: That’s a lot of hair.
Miseon: Yeah, and then I’ve got only 백원 (baegwon) .
Keith: 백원? 백원 (baegwon? baegwon) is 100₩.
Miseon: A hundred Won.
Keith: Not so much money, but good deal, may be.
Miseon: Yeah, yeah, you know, it was a little money by the time. And, yeah, but you know, even though it’s not the money, but I wanted to make my own, like spending money, right. So, yeah, I actually pluck my dad’s hair a lot, a lot. Seriously a lot.
Keith: Well, we hope you made a lot of money.
Miseon: Well, it wasn’t that a lot though. but, go back to the original dialogue. So in this dialogue, because of what he said at the end, he owes her a lot of allowance.
Keith: Yeah, I mean if you don’t know your kid is in middle school, Yeah, you definitely owe them some allowance.
Miseon: That’s right.
Keith: Well, in case our listeners want to find out which Korean words the daughter used to ask for her allowance, which is very important, by the way …
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: Let’s go to the vocabulary section.
Miseon: 네 (ne).
VOCAB LIST
Keith: The first word is...
Miseon: 피곤하다 (pigonhada) [natural native speed]
Keith: to be tired
Miseon: 피곤하다 (pigonhada) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 피곤하다 (pigonhada) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 괜찮다 (gwaenchanta) [natural native speed]
Keith: to be okay, to be all right (to deny an offer)
Miseon: 괜찮다 (gwaenchanta) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 괜찮다 (gwaenchanta) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 안마하다 (anmahada) [natural native speed]
Keith: to give a massage, to massage
Miseon: 안마하다 (anmahada) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 안마하다 (anmahada) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 잠깐 (jamkkan) [natural native speed]
Keith: just a moment, wait
Miseon: 잠깐 (jamkkan) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 잠깐 (jamkkan) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 용돈 (yongdon) [natural native speed]
Keith: allowance, spending money
Miseon: 용돈 (yongdon) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 용돈 (yongdon) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 다 (da) [natural native speed]
Keith: all, everything
Miseon: 다 (da) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 다 (da) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 쓰다 (sseuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to spend, to use
Miseon: 쓰다 (sseuda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 쓰다 (sseuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 벌써 (beolsseo) [natural native speed]
Keith: already
Miseon: 벌써 (beolsseo) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 벌써 (beolsseo) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 중학생 (jung-haksaeng) [natural native speed]
Keith: middle school student
Miseon: 중학생 (jung-haksaeng) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 중학생 (jung-haksaeng) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 더 (deo) [natural native speed]
Keith: more
Miseon: 더 (deo) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 더 (deo) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 주다 (juda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to give
Miseon: 주다 (juda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 주다 (juda)[natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 모르다 (moreuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to not know
Miseon: 모르다 (moreuda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 모르다 (moreuda) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right, so we’re going to take a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Miseon: The first word we look at is 피곤하다 (pigonhada)
Keith: To be tired.
Miseon: 피곤하다 (pigonhada), 피곤하다 (pigonhada).
Keith: So, 피곤하다 (pigonhada) is to be tired. How do you say I’m tired.
Miseon: First, between friends you can say 피곤해 (pigonhae).
Keith: 피곤해 (pigonhae). And when you’re very tired you can say 아~~~~~~~~~ 피곤해 (a~~~~~~~~~ pigonhae).
Miseon: Well, if you too tired, you can even say that you’re 피곤해 (pigonhae).
Keith: Yeah, you don’t have the energy to say it like this.
Miseon: Right, right. 힘 없어요 (him eopseoyo).
Keith: Which is also another form of to be tired. But getting back to 피곤해 (pigonhae), how do you say when you want to be a little more polite?
Miseon: You can say 피곤해요. (pigonhaeyo)
Keith: Right, 미선 씨 (miseon ssi), 오늘 피곤해요? (oneul pigonhaeyo?) “Are you tired today?”
Miseon: No, I’m not tired 안 피곤해요 (an pigonhaeyo). It’s fun, it’s a lot of fun recording with you, how can I be tired, right?
Keith: You know, you’re never tired, I think. Big ball of energy.
Miseon: Yeah, fire fire.
Keith: All right. Well, that’s great to know that’s you're not tired and you’re energetic, so you’re going to be able help out with our next word, What are we looking at?
Miseon: Okay, it’s something that’s very good when you’re tired.
Keith: Well, let me guess. A massage.
Miseon: Uh! Massage, Yeah, yeah, of course you got me.
Keith: I love massages.
Miseon: I can give you a massage.
Keith: Well, first let’s go over that word.
Miseon: Okay, 안마 (anma) or 안마하다 (anmahada).
Keith: “A massage” or “to give a massage”.
Miseon: 안마, 안마하다 (anma, anmahada)
Keith: So 안마하다 (anmahada) means “to do a massage”, right?
Miseon: 네 (ne), so the girl suggested doing some 안마 (anma) for her father when she wanted to asked for more allowance. She said 안마해 줄까? (anmahae julkka?)
Keith: “Shall I give you a massage?” Okay, great job. Now it’s time to go to the focus of this lesson.

Lesson focus

Keith: So Miseon-ssi, can you help us out, what are we focusing on?
Miseon: We’re focusing on, is to learn the expression related to pocket money, and also practice using the past tense.
Keith: Now, when talking about pocket money, I think two essential verbs to know know are "to give" and "to spend."
Miseon: 네 (ne). but first, the word for allowance or pocket money is 용돈 (yongdon)
Keith: One more time.
Miseon: 용돈, 용돈 (yongdon, yongdon)
Keith: So, how do you say: To give?
Miseon: 주다 (juda)
Keith: Right, 주다 (juda) is the verb that means to give. But in this conversation, how was it used?
Miseon: It was used in the form 줘 (jwo) which means “give me” in intimate language.
Keith: Yeah, the daughter didn’t feel the need to speak in formal language to her father, so she’s asking him to give her more allowance by using...
Miseon: 줘 (jwo).
Keith: How about when you want to be more polite? And you ask someone to get something to you?
Miseon: In this case you use the expression 주세요 (juseyo).
Keith: Ok, so let’s look at some examples, Miseon-ssi, examples 주세요 (juseyo).
Miseon: Oh, you got me. Okay.
Keith: All right, so how do you say: Give it to me, again?
Miseon: 줘 (jwo).
Keith: And that’s very casual. How about give me more?
Miseon: 더 줘 (deo jwo).
Keith: And how about give this to me?
Miseon: 이거 줘 (jwo).
Keith: "Give it to me quickly."
Miseon: 빨리 줘 (ppalli jwo).
Keith: "Please give it to me." politely?
Miseon: 이거 주세요 (igeo juseyo).
Keith: Ok, great job. Now, you ask for allowance, and you received it. So, you have to spend it. How do you say to spend?
Miseon: 쓰다 (sseuda)
Keith: Yeah, 쓰다 (sseuda) is the verb that means to use, or to spend when it comes to money.
Miseon: 네 (ne), and in this conversation the daughter is mentioning that she’s spent all of her allowance, therefore it was used in the past tense.
Keith: Right, so in order to change a verb into the past tense you add.
Miseon: -았 (-eot)
Keith: or -었 (-eot)
Miseon: or -였 (yeot) and -어 (eo) at the end of the verb stem, but with the verb 쓰다 (sseuda) since the verb stem 쓰 does not end in -아 (-a), you add -었 (-eot).
Keith: So what does it become?
Miseon: 썼어 (sseosseo).
Keith: Good, now you know what’s next, right?
Miseon: 네 (ne), examples.
Keith: That’s right, you know how we do it. So, how do you say: To use, again?
Miseon: 쓰다 (sseuda)
Keith: So, "I use."
Miseon: 써 (sseo).
Keith: "I used it." / "I spent it."
Miseon: 썼어 (sseosseo).
Keith: "I spent it." (polite)
Miseon: 썼어요 (sseosseoyo).
Keith: "I've spent all of it."
Miseon: 다 썼어요 (da sseosseoyo).
Keith: "I've spent all my allowance."
Miseon: 용돈 다 썼어요 (yongdon da sseosseoyo).
Keith: And I think a lot of our younger listeners, may be able to relate to this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne), of course.

Outro

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Miseon: Audio files, PDFs, videos. Get everything we have.
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Miseon: Not a premium member, and want to test it out?
Keith: Get a sample feed at koreanclass101.com
Well, everyone, thanks for listening and don’t spend all your spending money. Okay, save a little bit.
Miseon: Right. If you don’t have it. You can ask father, mother, anytime.
Keith: Anytime. All right, bye bye.
Miseon: Bye. 아니 계세요 (ani gyeseyo).

Grammar

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15 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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What did you do to raise your allowance when you were young? :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 06:11 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Dimple,


I'm not sure I understand which lesson you are referring to, since Season 4 has only 24 lessons in it.

If you are facing a technical issue, could you please reach out to KoreanClass101.com with screenshots attached?

Thank you!


Kind regards,

Levente

Team KoreanClass101.com

Dimple
Wednesday at 08:10 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi,


I had purchased the Basic plan and was able to read the lesson script, dialogue and the vocab list up until chapter 76 of Season-4. But from 77 onwards, I am unable to have the access to the dialogues and the vocab list.


Is there any way this can be fixed?

Goryo
Friday at 09:39 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Lyn Lyn Lyn,


The verbs with the ~Nikka and ~Nida endings, I have regarded as the most honorific form. Recently I read that they're informal. Please tell me if I just misread or misunderstood.


Goryo/Koryo, besides being my name or the dynasty, is also a Taekwondo poomsae or form which black belt first dan candidates need to perform well to pass successfully.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:02 PM
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Hi Goryo,


Thanks for posting. I was referring to your name, which is written in Korean as 고려. But it could also refer to the ancient Korean dynasty as well. 😄


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Goryo
Thursday at 08:33 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Lyn,


Thanks for the examples. Is there a verb "Gorrida" leading to the second set of conjugations or was that from basically Goryo I am or to be Goryo?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 02:24 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Goryo,


Thanks for posting.

Just remember there are three levels of politeness in Korean--informal, informal formal, and formal.

'Yo' is the informal-formal sentence ending.

Example:


가다

가요

가세요 -->'seyo', not 'yo'.


고려야

고려예요

고려입니다


Hope this was of help.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Goryo
Sunday at 09:19 PM
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I found one of the sample sentences to be so poetic. It's the one that said,

Hyeonwoo beolsseo jamdeulosseoyo.

Hyeonwoo already fell asleep.

"Jam" means slumber.

"Deuleosseoyo" means entered.

So Hyeonwoo entered into slumber or fell asleep.


I noticed verb combos too, like with anmahae julkke, the hada and juda concepts of doing and giving, doing and giving the massage. Pretty neat.

Goryo
Sunday at 02:03 PM
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Claire or Lyn.


Since learning Korean, what seems to have been drilled into me is that having a ~yo/ 요 at the end of a verb or the sentence for that matter always makes it formal.


If I ask, "Odie ka?" I am just being casual with buddies but rude if I say to the seniors.


Add ~yo / 요, "Odie kayo?" transforms me into a respectful person, as evidenced by the use of honorifics.


Then one post I read said "kayo" is informal formal while "kaseyo" is formal.


Using Claire's response to Hiba as guide, kayo is present / informal high.


I can hear Keith saying, "Just add yo to make it formal."


I am officially confused with "~yo" all.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:40 AM
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Hi Hiba,


As you mentioned, 모르다 is an irregular verb.

Please take a look at tense/politeness level conjugations as below:


1. 몰라 present/informal low

2. 몰라요 present/informal high

3. 모른다 present/formal low

4. 모릅니다 present/formal high


Past form 몰랐 + ending

1. 몰랐어 past/informal low

2. 몰랐어요 past/informal high

3. 몰랐다 past/formal low

4. 몰랐습니다 past/formal high


Thanks,

Claire

Team KoreanClass101.com

Hiba
Friday at 09:59 PM
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hello ,

I just want to clarify this 모르다 is irregular verb that will be 몰랐어 in the past .\and please can you provide me wit the conj conjugation steps

thank you