Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Miseon: 안녕하세요, 여러분! (annyeonghaseyo, yeoreobun!) KoreanClass101.com입니다. 저는 (imnida. jeoneun) Miseon에요. (eyo.)
Keith: Hey, and I am Keith. Welcome to newbie series, season 4, lesson 5; Negation in Korean – “No, I don’t hear you!”
Hello and welcome to the newbie series, season four at koreanclass101.com.
Miseon: So, brush up on the Korean that you started learning long ago, or start learning today.
Keith: Thanks for being here with us for this lesson. Miseon, What are we going to learn in this lesson?
Miseon: in this lesson, we’re going to learn how to make negative sentences in Korean using 안 (an).
Keith: It’s very very useful. And where does this conversation take place?
Miseon: On the phone.
Keith: And the conversation is between:
Miseon: 지상 (jisang) and an agent at a credit card company.
Keith: Oh, that sounds kind of scary. Apparently, the speakers are speaking for the first time.
Miseon: So they’re both using polite language, which is 존댓말 (jondaenmal).
Keith: Basic and premium members.
Miseon: If you have a 3G phone.
Keith: You can see the lesson notes in your favourite browser on your phone.
Miseon: Stop by koreanclass101.com to find out more.
Keith: Remember, commenting each day.
Miseon: And posting in the forum, are two great ways to get answers.
Keith: Community members.
Miseon: and staff are all ready to help.
Keith: Definitely take advantage. Okay, let’s listen to the conversation
DIALOGUE
지상 (jisang): 여보세요. (yeoboseyo?)
직원 (jigwon): 안녕하세요. 김지상 씨? (annyeong-haseyo. gimjisang ssi?)
지상 (jisang): 네. 누구세요? (ne. nuguseyo?)
직원 (jigwon): 네. 카드 회사입니다. (ne. kadeu hoesa-imnida.)
지상 (jisang): 네? 카드 회사요? (ne? kadeu hoesa-yo?)
직원 (jigwon): 카드 요금 내세요. (kadeu yogeum naeseyo.)
지상 (jisang): 네? 여보세요? 안 들려요. 여보세요? (ne? yeoboseyo? an deullyeoyo. yeoboseyo?)
직원 (jigwon): 여보세요? 안 들려요? 김지상 씨? (yeoboseyo? an deullyeoyo? gimjisang ssi?)
지상 (jisang): 여보세요. 네. 안 들려요. (yeoboseyo. ne. an deullyeoyo.)
직원 (jigwon): 들려요? 여보세요? (deullyeoyo? yeoboseyo?)
지상 (jisang): 휴… (hyu…)
Miseon: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
지상 (jisang): 여보세요. (yeoboseyo?)
직원 (jigwon): 안녕하세요. 김지상 씨? (annyeong-haseyo. gimjisang ssi?)
지상 (jisang): 네. 누구세요? (ne. nuguseyo?)
직원 (jigwon): 네. 카드 회사입니다. (ne. kadeu hoesa-imnida.)
지상 (jisang): 네? 카드 회사요? (ne? kadeu hoesa-yo?)
직원 (jigwon): 카드 요금 내세요. (kadeu yogeum naeseyo.)
지상 (jisang): 네? 여보세요? 안 들려요. 여보세요? (ne? yeoboseyo? an deullyeoyo. yeoboseyo?)
직원 (jigwon): 여보세요? 안 들려요? 김지상 씨? (yeoboseyo? an deullyeoyo? gimjisang ssi?)
지상 (jisang): 여보세요. 네. 안 들려요. (yeoboseyo. ne. an deullyeoyo.)
직원 (jigwon): 들려요? 여보세요? (deullyeoyo? yeoboseyo?)
지상 (jisang): 휴… (hyu…)
Miseon: 영어로 한번더. (yeongeoro hanbeondeo.)
Keith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
지상 (jisang): 여보세요. (yeoboseyo?)
Keith: Hello.
직원 (jigwon): 안녕하세요. 김지상 씨? (annyeong-haseyo. gimjisang ssi?)
Keith: Hello, is this Mr. Kim Jisang?
지상 (jisang): 네. 누구세요? (ne. nuguseyo?)
Keith: Yes, that's me. Who is this?
직원 (jigwon): 네. 카드 회사입니다. (ne. kadeu hoesa-imnida.)
Keith: Yes, I'm calling from your credit card company.
지상 (jisang): 네? 카드 회사요? (ne? kadeu hoesa-yo?)
Keith: Card company?
직원 (jigwon): 카드 요금 내세요. (kadeu yogeum naeseyo.)
Keith: Please pay for your credit card transactions.
지상 (jisang): 네? 여보세요? 안 들려요. 여보세요? (ne? yeoboseyo? an deullyeoyo. yeoboseyo?)
Keith: Huh? Hello? I don't hear you. Hello?
직원 (jigwon): 여보세요? 안 들려요? 김지상 씨? (yeoboseyo? an deullyeoyo? gimjisang ssi?)
Keith: Hello? You don't hear me, Mr. Kim Jisang?
지상 (jisang): 여보세요. 네. 안 들려요. (yeoboseyo. ne. an deullyeoyo.)
Keith: Hello? No, I don't hear you.
직원 (jigwon): 들려요? 여보세요? (deullyeoyo? yeoboseyo?)
Keith: Do you hear me? Hello?
지상 (jisang): 휴… (hyu…)
Keith: Whew...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Miseon: Hi Keith, do you think 지상 (jisang) did that on purpose?
Keith: Well, yeah. I mean, He was like, you don’t hear me? So, Yeah, I don’t hear you.
Miseon: It’s obvious, right?
Keith: 네 (ne). He’s answering, so of course he did that on purpose. He didn’t want to pay for his credit card, so, just pretending not to hear him. Hey, I can’t hear you … What? What?
Miseon: Oh god, that’s so … He must be so 똑똑 해요 (sinyong kadeu). But he’s going to have to pay eventually, right?
Keith: Yeah, definitely. Miseon, do you use your 신용 카드 (sinyong kadeu) your credit card a lot?
Miseon: Not a lot, I believe that credit card is evil. You know, I do have a credit card actually, to be honest, but I’m trying not to use, you know, much or many?
Keith: But how about culture in Korea? 신용 카드 문화 (sinyong kadeu munhwa) I guess, is that what would you say?
Miseon: Yeah, 신용 카드 문화 (sinyong kadeu munhwa). Yeah, that’s what we say.
Keith: What’s the credit card culture in Korea recently? I think in Korea it’s become increasingly increasingly, you know, focus on using credit cards, or may be debit cards, but now more people are carrying around credit cards and using them much more often I think.
Miseon: Yeah, recently I visited Korea like a couple of years ago, and then, so many people are actually using credit cards, because they want to have a gift or tributes from the credit card company, or … Yeah.
Keith: So, you dot up your points, you use them. And then, may be you get a toaster oven.
Miseon: 네 (ne). I want a coffee machine, something like that, right?
Keith: Everyone likes free gifts, right?
Miseon: Yeah, yeah.
Keith: Okay, well, Let’s take a look at the vocabulary of this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
The first word is:
Miseon: 누구 (nugu) [natural native speed]
Keith: who
Miseon: 누구 (nugu) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 누구 (nugu) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 카드 (kadeu) [natural native speed]
Keith: card, credit card
Miseon: 카드 (kadeu) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 카드 (kadeu) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 회사 (hoesa) [natural native speed]
Keith: company
Miseon: 회사 (hoesa) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 회사 (hoesa) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 요금 (yogeum) [natural native speed]
Keith: fee, fare, price
Miseon: 요금 (yogeum) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 요금 (yogeum) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 내다 (naeda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to turn in, to pay
Miseon: 내다 (naeda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 내다 (naeda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 들리다 (deullida) [natural native speed]
Keith: to be heard, to hear
Miseon: 들리다 (deullida) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 들리다 (deullida) [natural native speed]
Keith: And finally...
Miseon: 안 (an) [natural native speed]
Keith: not
Miseon: 안 (an) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 안 (an) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right, well, let’s take a deeper look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne), the first word we’ll look at is 요금 (yogeum).
Keith: Fee, fare or price.
Miseon: 요금, 요금. (yogeum, yogeum.)
Keith: Okay, so for what kind of things can you use this word 요금? (yogeum?)
Miseon: Well, the word 요금 (yogeum) has a very wide usage, so you can use it for a lot of things.
Keith: Okay, so how about bus fare? Can we use that?
Miseon: 네 (ne), 버스 요금 (beoseu yogeum).
Keith: All right, and taxi fare?
Miseon: 택시 요금 (taeksi yogeum).
Keith: How about a cell phone bill, which we all hear, right?
Miseon: 핸드폰 요금 (haendeupon yogeum).
Keith: All right, what else is there?
Miseon: 수도 요금 (sudo yogeum).
Keith: And that one’s for the water fees.
Miseon: 네 (ne), and then 전기 요금 (jeongi yogeum).
Keith: And that one’s electricity fees. Okay, great. What’s the next word we’re going to look at?
Miseon: Next word is a verb that you can use with this word 요금 (yogeum).
Keith: So, something that we all don’t like to do. We have to pay, right?
Miseon: Ah, that’s my hate. No, you have to pay. I wouldn’t say that, You have to pay, right? So, it’s 내다 (naeda) in Korean.
Keith: Right, that’s to pay.
Miseon: 내다 (naeda)
Keith: So how do you say: I’m going to pay.
Miseon: 제가 낼 거예요 (jega nael geoyeyo), or 제가 낼게요. (jega naelgeyo.)
Keith: Well listeners don’t worry if you’re not familiar with the sentence structure yet. Here just focus on the word itself. Can we have those one more time?
Miseon: Sure, 제가 낼 거예요 (jega nael geoyeyo), or 제가 낼게요 (jega naelgeyo)
Keith: Okay, and how about: I paid already.
Miseon: 벌써 냈어요. (beolsseo naesseoyo.)
Keith: Okay, great. Now it looks like it’s time for the focus of this lesson.

Lesson focus

Keith: So, what’s the focus of this lesson.
Miseon: The focus of this lesson is how to make negative sentences using the verb “to hear”.
Keith: Okay, so as in the example:
Miseon: 안 들려요! (an deullyeoyo!)
Keith: I don’t hear you.
Miseon: 네 (ne), when you’re talking on the phone and you suddenly don’t hear the other person’s voice.
Keith: Or may be when you want to pretend that you don’t hear them. Kind of liking this dialogue.
Miseon: Yeah, all right. And then, you need to tell the person that you don’t hear his or her voice.
Keith: Right, so then you’re going to need to make a negative statement.
Miseon: Exactly, in Korean, there isn’t just one way of making negative sentences, but the most commonly used method is very simple.
Keith: All right, so how do you do that then?
Miseon: You just have to add the word 안 (an) in front of the verb.
Keith: Yeah, sounds pretty simple. So, how about an example?
Miseon: The word for: To go is 가다 (gada) and if you want to say: I go, you say 가요 (gayo), right?
Keith: Right, and then how do you say: I don’t go, or I’m not going.
Miseon: 안 가요. (an gayo.)
Keith: Yeah, really really simple. So, how about another example, let’s say: It’s good.
Miseon: 좋아요. (joayo.)
Keith: Okay, and how about: It’s not good?
Miseon: 안 좋아요. (an joayo.)
Keith: Really simple. So how was it used in this dialogue?
Miseon: 안 들려요. (an deullyeoyo.)
Keith: “I don’t hear you”. Okay, well, now I think we have to have a closer look at the expression 들리다. (deullida.) What do you think, Miseon?
Miseon: I’m going to say that.
Keith: Good. So what’s the word again?
Miseon: 들리다 (deullida.)
Keith: To hear, or to be heard.
Miseon: 들리다, 들리다. (deullida, deullida.)
Keith: Okay. So, you may know in English, you would say that you hear, or can hear something. But in Korean it’s a little different.
Miseon: 네 (ne). You need to say that something is heard in the passive voice. So this verb 들리다 (deullida) is used like an active verb, but the meaning is passive.
Keith: Exactly, so when you hear a sound, you say that that sound it is heard to your ears, rather than you hear the sound. But Miseon, why is that?
Miseon: Well, it’s because in Korean, if you use the word to hear, which is 듣다 (deutda), it mean “to listen”.
Keith: Yeah, so if you want to distinguish "hear" and "listen", in Korean it becomes "to be heard" and "to listen".
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: Okay, let’s look at some examples.
Miseon: 네 (ne). using 듣다 (deutda) to listen, you can say 음악 들어요? (eumak deureoyo?)
Keith: And that means: Are you listening to music?
Miseon: But using 들리다 (deullida), to be heard, you can say 음악 들려요? (eumak deullyeoyo?)
Keith: Do you hear the music?
Miseon: Another example, 안 들어요 (an deureoyo).
Keith: I’m not listening.
Miseon: 안 들려요. (an deullyeoyo.)
Keith: I can’t hear it. All right, great job, Miseon-ssi.
Miseon: 감사합니다. (gamsahamnida.)

Outro

Keith: Now don’t forget to stop by koreanclass101.com and pick up the lesson notes.
Miseon: It has the conversation transcript.
Keith: Vocabs., sample sentences, and grammar explanation.
Miseon: And a culture insights section.
Keith: Seeing the Korean.
Miseon: Really helps you remember faster.
Keith: But don’t take our word for it. Please have a look for yourself.
Miseon: And let us know what you think.
Keith: All right, that’s going do it, thanks everyone for listening.
Miseon: Thank you very much! 감사합니다. (gamsahamnida.)
Keith: 감사합니다. (gamsahamnida.)
Miseon: See you next time.

Grammar

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19 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Have you ever pretend not to hear? :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 08:10 AM
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Hi 캐슬린,


Thanks for posting. Try using our search function to find materials on our website, it is at the top of the webpage!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

캐슬린
Tuesday at 11:15 PM
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Annyeonghaseyo newbie here. Anyone? Who can give me an example of a conversation using negation, possibility and ability dialogue? Badly need it for our Korean Class in school. 감사합니다 💕

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 05:25 AM
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Hi rio,


Thanks for posting. 제가 낼 거예요 shows stronger intent in comparison to 제가 낼게요, but both phrases are often used.

Hope this was of help!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

rio
Sunday at 05:31 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

안녕하세요 K101 팀!


In the lesson, Miseon씨 gave the examples - 제가 낼 거예요 and 제가 낼게요. Which one do Korean people use more often?


답장 기다리고 있겠습니다. 감사합니다! 😄

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:16 PM
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바네사씨 안녕하세요!


Thanks for posting.


이 레슨이 재밌어요! (This was a funny lesson!)



저는 음악를 들어요: I’m listening to music

-->음악을 듣고 있어요.


저는 음악이 들려요: I hear music

-->음악이 들려요/음악 소리가 들려요.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

바네사
Friday at 04:55 AM
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안녕하세요?

이 레슨이 재밌어요! (This was a funny lesson!) I think I got it right, but I just wanted to check which would be the appropriate particles to use in the examples of "hear" vs "listen" (they were very helpful, by the way!). Would the following be correct?

저는 음악를 들어요: I'm listening to music

저는 음악이 들려요: I hear music

감사합니다!

바네사 (12/17)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:04 PM
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Hi, David!


The past tense for 내다 is 냈다



Thank you.


Min Jung

Team KoreanClass101.com

David
Saturday at 04:50 PM
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What is the past tense for 내다


Thanks :innocent::innocent:

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 11:37 AM
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:wink:Hi, Iris. We also have the lessons for the beginner level. Please check the video lessons on the menu bar and watch Hangul Video lessons. It will help you learn basic Korean characters easily.

Kevin
Thursday at 06:02 PM
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Hi Iris, try GenkiKorean.com to learn the Korean Alphabets...