Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Miseon: 안녕하세요! 안녕하세요, (annyeonghaseyo! annyeonghaseyo,) KoreanClass101.com. Miseon입니다. (imnida.)
Keith: Hey, and I am Keith. Welcome to newbie series, season 4, lesson 4; Korean Imperative. Catch That Mosquito and Spray it!
Miseon: Ahhh, I hate mosquito!
Keith: Well, Miseon, you are going to like this lesson, because, you know what? We are going to kill them.
Miseon: Uh, that’s right, I forgot that one. Okay. 안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo), KoreanClass101.com여러분 (yeoreobun), I am Miseon and welcome to KoreanClass101.com.
Keith: With us, you’ll learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Miseon: Yes, we also provide you with culture insights.
Keith: And tips you won’t find in a textbook. All right, Miseon What are we going to learn in this lesson?
Miseon: In this lesson, we’re going to learn how to say: To catch, and to spray, and also practice using the imperative in Korean.
Keith: And where does this conversation take place?
Miseon: This conversation takes place at home, 집 (jip).
Keith: The conversation is between:
Miseon: Jinsu and Jina, a brother and a sister.
Keith: And they’re family so of course.
Miseon: Therefore, they’re speaking informally.
Keith: 반말 (banmal).
Miseon: 네. (ne.)
Keith: Now before you listen to the conversation.
Miseon: We want to ask.
Keith: Do you read the lesson notes while you listen?
Miseon: Seeing the Korean definitely helps.
Keith: If you have tried it.
Miseon: What do you think of it?
Keith: You can leave us feedback in the comments section of this lesson.
Okay, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
진수 (jinsu): 앗! 아이... 모기다… (at! ai... mogi-da…)
진아 (jina): 모기? 어디? (mogi? eodi?)
진수 (jinsu): 저기! 잡아! (jeogi! jaba!)
진아 (jina): 싫어. 오빠가 잡아! (sireo. obba-ga jaba!)
진수 (jinsu): 니가 잡아! 아... 가려워. (ni-ga jaba! a... garyeowo.)
진아 (jina): 오빠, 모기약 뿌려. (oppa, mogiyak ppuryeo.)
진수 (jinsu): 니가 뿌려. 앗! 또 물렸다. (ni-ga ppuryeo. at! tto mullyeotda.)
진아 (jina): 빨리 모기약 뿌려. (ppalli mogiyak ppuryeo.)
Miseon: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
진수 (jinsu): 앗! 아이... 모기다… (at! ai... mogi-da…)
진아 (jina): 모기? 어디? (mogi? eodi?)
진수 (jinsu): 저기! 잡아! (jeogi! jaba!)
진아 (jina): 싫어. 오빠가 잡아! (sireo. obba-ga jaba!)
진수 (jinsu): 니가 잡아! 아... 가려워. (ni-ga jaba! a... garyeowo.)
진아 (jina): 오빠, 모기약 뿌려. (oppa, mogiyak ppuryeo.)
진수 (jinsu): 니가 뿌려. 앗! 또 물렸다. (ni-ga ppuryeo. at! tto mullyeotda.)
진아 (jina): 빨리 모기약 뿌려. (ppalli mogiyak ppuryeo.)
Miseon: 영어로 한번더. (yeongeoro hanbeondeo.)
Keith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
진수 (jinsu): 앗! 아이... 모기다… (at! ai... mogi-da…)
Keith: Ouch! Jeez...it's a mosquito.
진아 (jina): 모기? 어디? (mogi? eodi?)
Keith: A mosquito? Where?
진수 (jinsu): 저기! 잡아! (jeogi! jaba!)
Keith: There! Catch it!
진아 (jina): 싫어. 오빠가 잡아! (sireo. obba-ga jaba!)
Keith: I don't want to. You catch it!
진수 (jinsu): 니가 잡아! 아... 가려워. (ni-ga jaba! a... garyeowo.)
Keith: You catch it! Argh...it's itching.
진아 (jina): 오빠, 모기약 뿌려. (oppa, mogiyak ppuryeo.)
Keith: Spray the repellent!
진수 (jinsu): 니가 뿌려. 앗! 또 물렸다. (ni-ga ppuryeo. at! tto mullyeotda.)
Keith: You spray it. Ouch! I was bitten again.
진아 (jina): 빨리 모기약 뿌려. (ppalli mogiyak ppuryeo.)
Keith: Hurry up and spray the repellent.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Miseon: Ok, so they killed it, right?
Keith: We hope so.
Miseon: Okay.
Keith: Well, Miseon, how about what you do when you see 모기 (mogi), a mosquito?
Miseon: I’ll try to kill by my hands. Kidding.
Keith: You want to kill... Death!
Miseon: No, Kidding. I usually, like, run away from mosquito. Now I don’t like it at all.
Keith: Well, I do the same thing; I scream and run. So I’ll take it to a step further. I scream.
Miseon: Right.
Keith: Oh, mosquito. No, actually I hide under my blanket, so the mosquito can’t get in.
Miseon: Okay, that’s a good idea, but sometimes a mosquito can get in even though I just like, covered with blanket.
Keith: And if they’re inside your blanket … Goodbye.
Miseon: Right, right.
Keith: But in Korea you can expect quite a bit of mosquitos trying to bite you, in the summer?
Miseon: 네, 모기가 정말 많아요. (ne, mogiga jeongmal manayo.) You can see a lot of mosquitos specially July and August.
Keith: But, you know, it’s usually not a lot of mosquitos that bother. It’s usually that one mosquito that keeps escaping, that you can’t catch.
Miseon: Totally, I feel it, I feel it. Yah, 맞아요 맞아요. (majayo majayo.)
Keith: Well, as long as you’re going to just go ahead and catch them yourself that’s fine. But if you want to tell someone to catch that mosquito in Korea, you’re going to need some Korean expressions.
Miseon: 네 (ne), and I believe we are going to learn those expressions in the vocab. section.
Keith: Oh, you’re so correct, Miseon-shi.
Miseon: 네 (ne), I’m so smart, 어떡 해요 (eotteok haeyo).
Keith: So smart.
VOCAB LIST
Keith: The first word we have is:
Miseon: 모기 (mogi) [natural native speed]
Keith: mosquito
Miseon: 모기 (mogi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 모기 (mogi)[natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 어디 (eodi) [natural native speed]
Keith: where
Miseon: 어디 (eodi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 어디 (eodi) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 저기 (jeogi) [natural native speed]
Keith: there, over there
Miseon: 저기 (jeogi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 저기 (jeogi) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 잡다 (japtta) [natural native speed]
Keith: to catch
Miseon: 잡다 (japtta) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 잡다 (japtta) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 싫다 (silta) [natural native speed]
Keith: no, I don't want to
Miseon: 싫다 (silta) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 싫다 (silta)[natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 니 (ni) [natural native speed]
Keith: you, your (intimate)
Miseon: 니 (ni) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 니 (ni) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 가렵다 (garyeopda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to be itchy
Miseon: 가렵다 (garyeopda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 가렵다 (garyeopda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 모기약 (mogiyak) [natural native speed]
Keith: mosquito repellent
Miseon: 모기약 (mogiyak) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 모기약 (mogiyak) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 뿌리다 (ppurida) [natural native speed]
Keith: to sprinkle, to spray
Miseon: 뿌리다 (ppurida) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 뿌리다 (ppurida) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 물리다 (mullida) [natural native speed]
Keith: to be bitten
Miseon: 물리다 (mullida) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 물리다 (mullida) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: Right, now we are going to take a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Miseon: The first word we’ll look at is 니 (ni), not your knee, 니 (ni).
Keith: In Korean and that means you, and this is in informal Korean.
Miseon: 니 (ni), 니 (ni).
Keith: And this word is very colloquial too. Now, what’s the original, most basic way of saying you in Korean in the intimate politeness level?
Miseon: 너 (neo).
Keith: Yah, that the normal word, Yah.
Miseon: That’s standard, right?
Keith: And what if you want to be polite, what would you say?
Miseon: 당신 (dangsin), but a lot of people think of politer word for “you” like 당신 (dangsin), but it’s actually not really very recommendable to use that.
Keith: Yah, it’s actually translated as “you” and is a politer form, but 당신 (dangsin) is basically polite but not really commonly used, because it can have a lot of other meanings.
Miseon: 네 (ne), so instead you just don’t say anything to refer to the other person.
Keith: Yah, so, actually I had .. I myself had a lot of trouble with this, what do I call him? He’s my superior, He’s my 형 (hyeong) or whatever but, you know I can’t call him 형 (hyeong) because I’m not close with him or whoever. What I call him? Help me, I don’t know what to say. So usually what I did was, I just didn’t say his name at all. Or, you know, if he didn’t have a title, or she, if they don’t have titles like; my boss, like that person, or whatever, I wouldn’t say their title, I just knew their name and I wouldn’t say anything, just straight to the verb.
Miseon: Right, right.
Keith: In Korean.
Miseon: Yah, that’s true, yah. A lot of people like, drop “you” and “I” as subject, right? So, you know, not necessarily using like, Keith-shi or Miseon-shi, sometimes they don’t want to do that way, just you know, go straight to, you know.
Keith: The verb.
Miseon: Yah, sentences, right?
Keith: Right.
Miseon: We don’t like, you know, calling my name, or your name.
Keith: So, if you’re ever get lost for words you don’t know what to call that person, and may be you don’t want to use -shi for some reason, because, you know, your superior is usually not supposed to use someone someone -shi, right? So it’s … if you at a lost of words, don’t worry about it, just lead the subject out.
Miseon: Right, that’s true. Or you can also say it like, 저기요 (jeogiyo) as in the vocab list.
Keith: That’s right.
Miseon: You can use that one too.
Keith: But, yah. I mean, even if you lead the subject out, people will understand you, based on the context. And you know what? That’s a part of the beauty of the Korean language.
Miseon: That’s true.
Keith: So, let’s go back to the causal version of “you”, which once again is...
Miseon: 니 (ni) . So 니 (ni) is often used instead of 너 (neo) and 니 (ni) is more colloquial and more casual.
Keith: Yes, so be careful not to use it to people who are older than you, but you can use 니 (ni) with your close friends like your best friends.
Miseon: Right. It can mean: You or your.
Keith: Yah, the possessive as well, for example:
Miseon: 니 우산 (ni usan)
Keith: Your umbrella.
Miseon: 니가 먹었어? (niga meogeosseo?)
Keith: Did you eat? Okay, great. What’s the next word we are looking at?
Miseon: The next word, I think it’s very interesting.
Keith: What is it?
Miseon: 모기약 (mogiyak)
Keith: Mosquito repellent.
Miseon: 모기약, 모기약. (mogiyak, mogiyak.)
Keith: Yah, and, I can definitely see why you so said it’s interesting, because the last word, 약 (yak). What does that mean in Korean?
Miseon: It means actually medicine; literal translation is “medicine”, right.
Keith: Yah, so literally it’s “mosquito medicine”.
Miseon: That’s right, but actually it’s not medicine at all. It’s a pesticide.
Keith: Yah, although it’s 약 (yak) which is literally “medicine”, it’s not medicine for mosquitos, we don’t want them to get healthy.
Miseon: No.
Keith: It’s actually what is it.
Miseon: It’s poison.
Keith: You want to kill them.
Miseon: I want to kill them. It’s poison for the mosquitos actually, right?
Keith: Yah, but, actually I think it’s pretty easy to remember; mosquito plus medicine 모기약 (mogiyak).
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: All right, now let’s go to the focuses lesson.

Lesson focus

Keith: So Miseon-shi, what’s the focus for this lesson?
Miseon: In this lesson, we are learning how to make imperative sentences, using the expression: To catch, and to spray.
Keith: Okay, as in the example:
Miseon: 모기 잡아! (mogi jaba!)
Keith: "Catch the mosquito!"
Miseon: Yah, I got it. When you want to tell someone to do something, that’s called the imperative, right?
Keith: Right.
Miseon: And in Korean, unless you’re using the most formal version of speech, the imperative is the same as the plain present tense.
Keith: Yah, so it’s very easy to conjugate. So, let’s have a look at an example.
Miseon: Sure take out -다 (-da) at the end from the verb and you’ll have the verb stem.
Keith: And?
Miseon: And you add -아 (a), -어 (eo), or -여 (yeo) at the end. So, let’s look at the verb 잡다 (japda) first, Ok.
Keith: That’s the verb: To catch. One more time.
Miseon: 잡다 (japda).
Keith: 잡다 (japda) is: To catch, to grab or to even arrest.
Miseon: 네 (ne), you can be a teacher. My part, right? Okay. Don’t steal more than that. And since 잡다's (japda's) 잡 (jap) has a vowel ㅏ (a) sounds already, add -아 (a) at the end, and it becomes 잡아 (jaba).
Keith: For example:
Miseon: 이거 잡아! (igeo jaba!)
Keith: "Catch this!"
Miseon: 파리 잡아! (pari jaba!)
Keith: "Catch the fly!"
Miseon: 저 사람 잡아! (jeo saram jaba!)
Keith: "Catch him!" And, how was this expression used in the dialogue for this lesson?
Miseon: 잡아! (jaba!)
Keith: "Catch it!"
Miseon: 오빠가 잡아! (oppaga jaba!)
Keith: The girl said to her brother; “You catch it”.
Miseon: 니가 잡아! (niga jaba!)
Keith: And the brother said to his younger sister; “You catch it”.
Miseon: 네 (ne). And let’s look at another word and practice more imperative.
Keith: Okay, sounds good. What’s the next word?
Miseon: 뿌리다 (ppurida)
Keith: 뿌리다 (ppurida) is "to spray." and since 뿌리다's (ppurida's) 뿌리 (ppuri) doesn't end in the vowel ㅏ (a), what do we add?
Miseon: -어 (-eo)
Keith: Yah, and we add -어 (-eo) at the end, and it becomes:
Miseon: 뿌려 (ppuri).
Keith: Okay. So, as in the example:
Miseon: 이거 뿌려. (igeo ppuryeo.)
Keith: "Spray this."
Miseon: 향수 뿌려. (hyangsu ppuryeo.)
Keith: "Spray perfume." And how was this expression used in this dialogue?
Miseon: 모기약 뿌려. (mogiyak ppuryeo.)
Keith: "Spray repellent."
Miseon: 니가 뿌려 (niga ppuryeo).
Keith: "You spray it." Okay, now we have just one more expression to go.
Miseon: 네 (ne), a very good one to know.
Keith: Because you might experience it at anytime.
Miseon: Exactly. The next expression is 가렵다 (garyeopda).
Keith: 가렵다 (garyeopda), and what does that mean?
Miseon: 가렵다 (garyeopda) is the verb that means "to be itchy" or "to be itching."
Keith: Yah, so when a mosquito bite is itchy or any part of your body is itching, you can say:
Miseon: 가려워요 (garyeowoyo)
Keith: And if you want to say more informally, you can say:
Miseon: 가려워. (garyeowo.)
Keith: Can you give us some examples?
Miseon: 머리가 가려워요. (meoriga garyeowoyo.)
Keith: "My head is itchy."
Miseon: 등이 가려워요. (deungi garyeowoyo.)
Keith: "My back is itchy." All right, great job, Miseon-shi.
Miseon: 감사합니다! (gamsahamnida!)
Keith: Let’s hope there is no more mosquitos.
Miseon: No, except you. Keith’s mosquito is here.

Outro

Keith: All right, well that’s going to do for this lesson.
Miseon: Premium members, don’t forget to access the premium feed.
Keith: The premium feed is powerful web 2.0 technology which allows you to get all of our contents through iTunes, with just a click of a button.
Miseon: That includes the PDFs, conversation only tracks, review tracks.
Keith: Yup, everything.
Miseon: To access the premium feed, or to find out more.
Keith: Visit koreanclass101.com, and on the lessons page, there is a “Subscribe to new basic or premium feeds today” graphic, click on that, scroll down.
Miseon: And click premium feed. It’s that easy.
Keith: There is also a basic feed, and sample feed, so you can test things out.
Miseon: All right.
Keith: Bye bye, everyone.
Miseon: Bye! 안녕히 계세요! (annyeonghi gyeseyo!)

Grammar

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24 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What do you usally do when you see a mosquito? :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 02:12 AM
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안녕하세요 Uttam,


Thank you so much for your kind message! 😇❤️️

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

Good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

레벤테 (Levente)

Team KoreanClass101.com

Uttam
Wednesday at 01:13 PM
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I started to read the lesson notes along with the lesson (since Newbie 3). I find it useful; sometimes I come across useful phrases and explanations and I make a note of it. Also, I find useful material in the comments too.

Thanks a lot.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 02:14 PM
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Hi Goryo,


Thanks for posting. I also remember climbing under a 'net', or 'canopy', in the summer, to avoid getting bitten! You could see the bugs trying to get through the net. 😅


Please let us know if you have any inquiries.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Goryo
Sunday at 10:45 AM
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Lyn,


Somehow I can still smell that repellent that you light with a match. I also recall checking on it from time to time during the compulsory nap time as a kid to have an idea how long before the mosquitoes get to attack again.


We also had a mosquito net or "kulambo" which was like a sealed canopy so those bloodsuckers can't get to us. When we pick up on buzzing sounds, alas!, a "security breach"has occurred.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 12:14 PM
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Hi Goryo,


Thanks for posting, thanks for sharing your tips. Yes, these days we just use bug repellent balm or spray ourselves with repellent. However, there are some indoor mosquito 'yak' (mostly electric, and more modern) that are still used, and in rural areas you will still see the older version where you light it with a match and the smoke repels the mosquitos.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Goryo
Thursday at 06:08 AM
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Back in the day, if a mosquito has landed on you and started sucking blood, we'd just slap it dead with the hand, splaattt!!!


Oh, it'd get nasty, yes, blood all over your arm especially if that mogi was paebulloyo, but you got revenge, so that's cool.



Mogiyak? Oh, please. By the time you'd grab one, the mosquito is long gone and continued his buffet with another victim. Besides, who can afford a mosquito spray or even knew such a product existed?

Goryo
Thursday at 05:52 AM
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Give the Lesson Transcript a 1-2-3 Treatment.


1. Before listening to the Audio, read it first. Imagine you are Keith or Miseon doing the teaching. Why read first? You'll feel like a psychic when you listen to the Audio the first time. It's like deja vu.

Remind yourself to pronounce loudly the Korean words.


2. The second time you read the Transcript, listen to the Audio at the same time. Did Keith or Miseon pronounce the words like you did earlier? Compared to other students who've just read the transcript, you're at an advantage since it's not your first rodeo.


3. Read it again without the audio for reinforcement.

KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 12:39 AM
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Hi Ashley,


Thank you for posting--we are happy to hear this! Keep up the good work and please let us know if you have any questions along the way.❤️️


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Ashley
Wednesday at 08:58 AM
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안녕하세요,

I just want to say that i have taken the advice of reading the lesson transcript while i listen to each lesson and it has helped my learning and ability to remember each lesson so much more. So thank you for the studying tip because it has enhanced my learning ability so much. 감사합니다!

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 10:13 AM
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Hello Ian,


Yes, that's true : ) You can see them in September, but I don't think you need to worry about it too much. : )


Thank you for asking,


Jae

Team KoreanClass101.com