Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Miseon: 여러분 안녕하세요 (yeoreobun annyeonghaseyo) KoreanClass101.com입니다. (imnida.)
Keith: Hi, I am Keith, welcome to newbie series season 4, lesson 22; “Make Sure You Get Everything You Want in Korea”. Hi, my name is Keith and I’m joined by Miseon.
Miseon: 안녕하세요 여러분 (annyeonghaseyo yeoreobun). Welcome back to koreanclass101.com
Keith: All right, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Miseon: Today we’re going to learn the most common way to say “and”, which means in Korean, 그리고. (geurigo.)
Keith: Right, and this conversation takes place...
Miseon: This conversation takes place on the phone.
Keith: And who’s this conversation between?
Miseon: Conversation between two friends, Ilsu and Sujeong. And Sujeong is in the hospital now.
Keith: Oh, that’s not good.
Miseon: Sad.
Keith: Well, the speakers are friends, so they’re going to be speaking in informal Korean.
Miseon: 네 (ne). 반말 이요. (banmal iyo.)
Keith: Listeners, I have a question.
Miseon: A question?
Keith: Yup, I want to know when was the last time you commented.
Miseon: Great question.
Keith: Stop by koreanclass101.com, leave us a comment or just say hi. All right, let’s listen in.
DIALOGUE
일수 (ilsu): 수정아, 병원이야? (sujeong-a, byeong-won-iya?)
수정 (sujeong): 응... 나 너무 아파... 입원했어. 병문안 와. (eung... na neomu apa. ibwonhaesseo. byeongmunan wa.)
일수 (ilsu): 정말? 언제 갈까? (jeongmal? eonje galkka?)
수정 (sujeong): 오늘! (oneul!)
일수 (ilsu): 그래. 뭐 사 갈까? (geurae. mwo sa galkka?)
수정 (sujeong): 과일. 그리고 피자. 그리고… (gwail. geurigo pija. geurigo…)
일수 (ilsu): 아... 그리고? (a... geurigo?)
수정 (sujeong): 음... 음료수. 그리고 만화책. (eum... eumryosu. geurigo manhwachaek.)
일수 (ilsu): 만화책? 그...래… (manhwachaek? geu...rae…)
수정 (sujeong): 그리고... 과자... 그리고… (geurigo... gwaja... geurigo…)
일수 (ilsu): 알았어. 이따 봐. (arasseo. itta bwa.)
Miseon: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
일수 (ilsu): 수정아, 병원이야? (sujeong-a, byeong-won-iya?)
수정 (sujeong): 응... 나 너무 아파... 입원했어. 병문안 와. (eung... na neomu apa. ibwonhaesseo. byeongmunan wa.)
일수 (ilsu): 정말? 언제 갈까? (jeongmal? eonje galkka?)
수정 (sujeong): 오늘! (oneul!)
일수 (ilsu): 그래. 뭐 사 갈까? (geurae. mwo sa galkka?)
수정 (sujeong): 과일. 그리고 피자. 그리고… (gwail. geurigo pija. geurigo…)
일수 (ilsu): 아... 그리고? (a... geurigo?)
수정 (sujeong): 음... 음료수. 그리고 만화책. (eum... eumryosu. geurigo manhwachaek.)
일수 (ilsu): 만화책? 그...래… (manhwachaek? geu...rae…)
수정 (sujeong): 그리고... 과자... 그리고… (geurigo... gwaja... geurigo…)
일수 (ilsu): 알았어. 이따 봐. (arasseo. itta bwa.)
Miseon: 영어로 한번더. (yeongeoro hanbeondeo.)
Keith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
일수 (ilsu): 수정아, 병원이야? (sujeong-a, byeong-won-iya?)
Keith: (On the phone) Sujeong...are you in the hospital?
수정 (sujeong): 응... 나 너무 아파... 입원했어. 병문안 와. (eung... na neomu apa. ibwonhaesseo. byeongmunan wa.)
Keith: Yeah...I'm so sick...I got hospitalized. Please come visit me.
일수 (ilsu): 정말? 언제 갈까? (jeongmal? eonje galkka?)
Keith: Really? When do you want me to come?
수정 (sujeong): 오늘! (oneul!)
Keith: Today!
일수 (ilsu): 그래. 뭐 사 갈까? (geurae. mwo sa galkka?)
Keith: Okay. What do you want me to bring?
수정 (sujeong): 과일. 그리고 피자. 그리고… (gwail. geurigo pija. geurigo…)
Keith: Fruit. And pizza. And...
일수 (ilsu): 아... 그리고? (a... geurigo?)
Keith: Oh...and?
수정 (sujeong): 음... 음료수. 그리고 만화책. (eum... eumryosu. geurigo manhwachaek.)
Keith: Um...drinks. And comic books.
일수 (ilsu): 만화책? 그...래… (manhwachaek? geu...rae…)
Keith: Comic books? A...all right.
수정 (sujeong): 그리고... 과자... 그리고… (geurigo... gwaja... geurigo…)
Keith: And snacks...and...
일수 (ilsu): 알았어. 이따 봐. (arasseo. itta bwa.)
Keith: Okay. See you later.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Keith: This conversation … Well, she wants a lot of things.
Miseon: I know. A lot of 그리고... 그리고... 그리고..., (geurigo... geurigo... geurigo...,) right?
Keith: Right. Well, if one of your friends were hospitalized, do you usually visit the hospital?
Miseon: Of course, you know, whenever I’m told that somebody is like, in a hospital I usually go, you know. That’s my traditional way to, like, respect my friends or other people that I know.
Keith: Well, I think most people will go, yeah.
Miseon: Yeah.
Keith: What’s … is there a typical Korean gift that you give to someone in the hospital I guess?
Miseon: We usually bring, like in the conversation, like bring fruit. What else? Or like soda, and, you know, if they can eat actually. If they cannot eat anything, then you shouldn’t bring anything.
Keith: Anything?
Miseon: Because, yeah, that gives the patient torture. If you bring some food.
Keith: Some food, right.
Miseon: Yeah, if the patient cannot eat rice see those things, like fruit and everything.
Keith: Well, you know, one thing is that, in America where I grow up, a lot of people in the hospital, they bring flowers and hey get well soon. But maybe flowers aren’t so common in the hospitals in Korea, is it?
Miseon: No, no. flowers is not really common actually. I mean some people actually bring it, but it’s not the common.
Keith: Maybe comic books.
Miseon: Yeah.
Keith: To pass that time
Miseon: Actually, you know, killing the time, you know, comic book is the best one.
Keith: Well, you know if you visit someone in hospital in Korean, all the shops in front of, or actually, in the hospital, they sell the same things.
Miseon: 네맞아요. (nemajayo.) juice, fruit.
Keith: Yeah, just wrapped up really nicely and in small containers.
Miseon: 네 (ne). I personally think it’s a waste of money. I think it’s much better to bring something that your friends can really enjoy.
Keith: Like what?
Miseon: Like books maybe or something that is more delicious than just a juice in glass bottles.
Keith: Yeah, and probably everybody has brought that because, they’re right next to the store, they’re next to the hospital.
Miseon: It’s convenience, right?
Keith: Yeah, a gift of convenience, not love.
Miseon: Right, right. Show your love.
Keith: All right, well, let’s take a look for the vocabulary for this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne)
VOCAB LIST
Keith: The first word we have is:
Miseon: 병원 (byeongwon) [natural native speed]
Keith: hospital
Miseon: 병원 (byeongwon) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 병원 (byeongwon) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 아프다 (apeuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: To hurt, to be in pain, to be painful.
Miseon: 아프다 (apeuda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 아프다 (apeuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 입원하다 (ibwonhada) [natural native speed]
Keith: to be hospitalized
Miseon: 입원하다 (ibwonhada) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 입원하다 (ibwonhada) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 병문안 (byeongmunan) [natural native speed]
Keith: visiting someone in the hospital, visiting a sick person
Miseon: 병문안 (byeongmunan) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 병문안 (byeongmunan) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 정말 (jeongmal) [natural native speed]
Keith: really, for real
Miseon: 정말 (jeongmal) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 정말 (jeongmal) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 언제 (eonje) [natural native speed]
Keith: when
Miseon: 언제 (eonje) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 언제 (eonje) [natural native speed]
Keith: After that.
Miseon: 오늘 (oneul) [natural native speed]
Keith: today
Miseon: 오늘 (oneul) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 오늘 (oneul) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 사 가다 (sa gada) [natural native speed]
Keith: to (buy and) bring, to take
Miseon: 사 가다 (sa gada) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 사 가다 (sa gada) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 과일 (gwail) [natural native speed]
Keith: fruit
Miseon: 과일 (gwail) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 과일 (gwail) [natural native speed]
Keith: After that.
Miseon: 피자 (pija) [natural native speed]
Keith: pizza
Miseon: 피자 (pija) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 피자 (pija) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 음료수 (eumnyosu) [natural native speed]
Keith: beverage, drink
Miseon: 음료수 (eumnyosu) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 음료수 (eumnyosu) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next we have.
Miseon: 만화책 (manhwachaek) [natural native speed]
Keith: comic book
Miseon: 만화책 (manhwachaek) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 만화책 (manhwachaek) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 과자 (gwaja) [natural native speed]
Keith: snacks
Miseon: 과자 (gwaja) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 과자 (gwaja) [natural native speed]
Keith: And finally.
Miseon: 이따 (itta) [natural native speed]
Keith: later today, later, a moment later
Miseon: 이따 (itta) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 이따 (itta) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right, well, let’s take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Miseon: 네 그럼요. (ne geureomyo.) The first word we’ll look at is 입원하다. (ibwonhada.)
Keith: To be hospitalized.
Miseon: 입원하다, 입원하다. (ibwonhada, ibwonhada.)
Keith: Okay, 입원하다. (ibwonhada.) That’s … it’s a big word, can we break this down?
Miseon: 입 (ip) means “to enter” and 원 (won) means “hospital”.
Keith: Okay, so 입 (ip) “enter”, 원 (won) “hospital”. Entering a hospital.
Miseon: 네맞아요. (nemajayo.) it means be hospitalized.
Keith: Okay, can we have it together one more time?
Miseon: 입원하다. (ibwonhada.) And if you gotten well, you can leave the hospital, 퇴원하다 (toewonhada) in Korean.
Keith: Okay, can we have that one more time?
Miseon: 퇴원하다. (toewonhada) 퇴 (toe) means “to leave”, to get out, so 퇴원하다. (toewonhada.)
Keith: Okay, what’s the next word?
Miseon: 사 가다 (sa gada)
Keith: To buy and bring.
Miseon: 사 가다, 사 가다. (sa gada, sa gada.)
Keith: Okay, and this is actually two words combined.
Miseon: 네맞아요. (nemajayo.) Two words is 사다 (sada) and 가다. (gada.)
Keith: All right, and those two mean “buy” and “go”, so it means to bring something but you don’t bring something that’s at home but you buy something on your way, and you bring it.
Miseon: 네 (ne) and you can say the opposite too.
Keith: What do you mean by opposite?
Miseon: If you’re not going, but coming from somewhere, you can say 사 오다. (sa oda.)
Keith: Okay, let’s take a look at the focus of this lesson.
Miseon: 네 한 번 잘 들어보세요 (ne han beon jal deureoboseyo)

Lesson focus

Keith: Okay, Miseon-ssi, what are we taking a look at?
Miseon: The focus of this lesson is how to say “and” in Korean.
Keith: As in the example:
Miseon: 그리고.. 피자. (geurigo.. pija.)
Keith: And pizza.
Miseon: 네 (ne) this is generally the most common way to say “and” in Korean.
Keith: 그리고 (geurigo). Well, is this the only expression that means “and”?
Miseon: No, there are other expressions too. Depending on the context, but especially when you’re linking sentences you say this.
Keith: Okay.
Miseon: And you can say 그리고 (geurigo) when you’re mentioning a list of actions unordered too.
Keith: And, you know what? You can say 그리고 (geurigo) as a filler while you’re thinking, like, um... 그리고... 음... (geurigo... eum…) haha.
Miseon: That’s true, I do that a lot actually because I … you know, I cannot really come up with … like the right word sometimes, then I’m like 그리고... 음.... (geurigo... eum…), something like that.
Keith: Right, kind of like a filler.
Miseon: Right.
Keith: All right, well, can you give us an example of, not how it’s used as a filler, but how it’s used normally to connect sentence.
Miseon: 이거 먹어. 그리고... 이거 마셔. (igeo meogeo. geurigo... igeo masyeo.)
Keith: "Eat this. And... drink this." Okay, and how was this 그리고 (geurigo) used in the dialogue?
Miseon: 과일. 그리고 피자. 그리고… (gwail. geurigo pija. geurigo…)
Keith: "Fruit. And pizza. And..."
Miseon: 아... 그리고? (a... geurigo?)
Keith: "Oh... And?"
Miseon: 음료수. 그리고 만화책. (eumnyosu. geurigo manhwachaek.)
Keith: "Drinks. And comic books."
Miseon: 그리고... 과자... 그리고… (geurigo... gwaja... geurigo…)
Keith: "And... snacks... and..." Well, before we go, let’s check out a few more sample sentences so our listeners can practice a little more.
Miseon: Great! 좋아요. (joayo.)
Keith: So how do we say, "Let's watch a movie. And let's have some coffee."
Miseon: 영화 보자. 그리고 커피 마시자. (yeonghwa boja. geurigo keopi masija.)
Keith: All right, how about we say, "Give me this one. And give me this one too, please."
Miseon: 이거 주세요. 그리고 이것도 주세요. (igeo juseyo. geurigo igeotdo juseyo.)
Keith: And finally, let’s say, "I'm meeting a friend today. And, I'm doing my part-time job."
Miseon: 오늘 친구 만나요. 그리고, 아르바이트 해요. (oneul chingu mannayo. geurigo, areubaiteu haeyo.)

Outro

Miseon: Ready to test what you just have learnt?
Keith: Make this lesson’s vocabulary stick by using lesson specific flashcards in the learning centre.
Miseon: There is a reason everyone uses flash cards.
Keith: They work.
Miseon: They really do help memorization.
Keith: You can get the flash cards for this lesson at:
Miseon: KoreanClass101.com
Keith: okay, well, thanks for listening, bye bye.
Miseon: 네(ne) 여러분 안녕히 계세요 (yeoreobun annyeonghi gyeseyo)

Grammar

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10 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Can you make an example sentence using "그리고" ? :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 07:32 PM
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Hi Tom,


Thank you for posting. You're right, the word 아르바이트 comes from the German word 'arbeit'. While it means 'work' in German, in Korean (and in Japanese too) it means part time work. :smile:

Please let us know if you have any other questions.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Tom O'Leary
Wednesday at 10:55 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

안녕하세요! 톰입니다.

Hello! I'm Tom


I noticed that in the sample sentences on the lesson notes that the word for part-time job was 아르바이트 (Aleubaiteu). Does this come from the German word Arbeit, meaning "work"? If so, would you happen to know why Korean borrowed this word? I'm learning both languages so I found this quite interesting :open_mouth:

Koreanclass101.com Verified
Monday at 12:17 PM
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Hey Robert,



한국인이지만, 불고기와 삼겹살은 정말 맛있는 것 같아요!:grin:

I am Korean but still think bulgigi and samgyupsal are one of the best among Korean cuisine!


삼계탕은 어떠신가요?

How about samgyetang?





Thank you


Madison

Team Koreanclass101.com

Robert
Thursday at 07:38 PM
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안녕하세요

불고기 그리고 삼겹살을 제가 좋아하는 음식입니다


Hello,

My favourite foods are Bulgogi and Samgyeopsal

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 10:14 AM
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:razz:Hi, Jani.


간식(gansik) means 'every small dishes between meals'. If you have a small size of Korean dishes such as snacks, rice-cakes, or salads, then you can name them as '간식'


과자(gajwa) means only snacks, such as Pringles.


So, you can have 과자 as a 간식.

jani
Thursday at 05:42 PM
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what's the difference between 간식 and 과자 ?

ferdie
Monday at 01:40 PM
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makes me more excited to learn korean language...

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 03:25 PM
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여러분 연습해 보아요~~:twisted:


What is your favorite Korean food?

좋아하는 한국음식이 뭐예요?


저는 떡볶이, 김치찌개, 해물전, 만두, 그리고 낙지볶음을 좋아해요.


여러분은요??

알려주세요~:lol:

John Moxford
Tuesday at 05:47 PM
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