Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Miseon: 안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo), KoreanClass101.com입니다 (imnida).
Keith: Hey, and I am Keith. Welcome to newbie series, season 4, lesson 2; Korean past tense – “Did you wash yourself or brush your teeth?” I hope so. Hello and welcome to koreanclass101.com, the fastest easiest and most fun way to learn Korean.
Miseon: I am Miseon, and thanks again for being here with us for this newbie series, season 4 lesson.
Keith: In this lesson, you are going to learn...
Miseon: The expressions for to wash and to brush one’s teeth, and practice the past tense using these words.
Keith: Okay and this conversation takes place.
Miseon: 집이요 (jibiyo).
Keith: At home, and conversation is between.
Miseon: Suhyeong and his mother.
Keith: And son is using polite language to his mother.
Miseon: 존댓말. (jondaenmal.)
Keith: And the mother is using intimate language to her son.
Miseon: 반말 (banmal).
Keith: Listeners, I have a question.
Miseon: A question?
Keith: Yeah, I want to know when was the last time you commented.
Miseon: Yes, great question.
Keith: Stop by koreanclass101.com, leave us a comment or just say hi.
Miseon: Okay, you heard Keith.
Keith: Okay, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
엄마 (eomma): 아휴... 냄새... 수형아, 씻었어? (ahyu... naemsae... suhyeong-a, ssiseosseo?)
수형 (suhyeong): 네. 씻었어요. (ne. ssiseosseoyo.)
엄마 (eomma): 진짜? 진짜 씻었어? (jinjja? jinjja ssiseosseo?)
수형 (suhyeong): 세수했어요. (sesuhaesseoyo.)
엄마 (eomma): 이 닦았어? (i dakkasseo?)
수형 (suhyeong): 네? 아... 아니요… (ne? a... aniyo…)
엄마 (eomma): 머리 감았어? 아휴... 냄새... (meori gamasseo? ahyu... naemsae…)
수형 (suhyeong): 아니요... (aniyo…)
엄마 (eomma): 빨리 씻어! (ppalli ssiseo!)
수형 (suhyeong): 네... (ne…)
Miseon: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
엄마 (eomma): 아휴... 냄새... 수형아, 씻었어? (ahyu... naemsae... suhyeong-a, ssiseosseo?)
수형 (suhyeong): 네. 씻었어요. (ne. ssiseosseoyo.)
엄마 (eomma): 진짜? 진짜 씻었어? (jinjja? jinjja ssiseosseo?)
수형 (suhyeong): 세수했어요. (sesuhaesseoyo.)
엄마 (eomma): 이 닦았어? (i dakkasseo?)
수형 (suhyeong): 네? 아... 아니요… (ne? a... aniyo…)
엄마 (eomma): 머리 감았어? 아휴... 냄새… (meori gamasseo? ahyu... naemsae…)
수형 (suhyeong): 아니요... (aniyo…)
엄마 (eomma): 빨리 씻어! (ppalli ssiseo!)
수형 (suhyeong): 네... (ne…)
Miseon: 영어로 한번더. (yeongeoro hanbeondeo.)
Keith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
엄마 (eomma): 아휴... 냄새... 수형아, 씻었어? (ahyu... naemsae... suhyeong-a, ssiseosseo?)
Keith: Whew...it smells... Suhyeong, did you wash yourself?
수형 (suhyeong): 네. 씻었어요. (ne. ssiseosseoyo.)
Keith: Yes, I washed myself.
엄마 (eomma): 진짜? 진짜 씻었어? (jinjja? jinjja ssiseosseo?)
Keith: Really? Did you really wash yourself?
수형 (suhyeong): 세수했어요. (sesuhaesseoyo.)
Keith: I washed my face.
엄마 (eomma): 이 닦았어? (i dakkasseo?)
Keith: Did you brush your teeth?
수형 (suhyeong): 네? 아... 아니요… (ne? a... aniyo…)
Keith: Huh? No...I didn't.
엄마 (eomma): 머리 감았어? 아휴... 냄새… (meori gamasseo? ahyu... naemsae…)
Keith: Did you wash your hair? Whew...it smells!
수형 (suhyeong): 아니요... (aniyo…)
Keith: No...
엄마 (eomma): 빨리 씻어! (ppalli ssiseo!)
Keith: Wash up quickly!
수형 (suhyeong): 네... (ne…)
Keith: All right...
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Miseon: Well, that reminds me of my childhood.
Keith: Well, Miseon, were you a dirty child?
Miseon: What? I guess so.
Keith: That’s why it reminds you of your childhood.
Miseon: What about you, Keith?
Keith: I was a clean boy, and I was also a liar too.
Miseon: Okay, so Keith, do you get to hear this a lot from your mother?
Keith: What are you talking about right now? I am not a child anymore.
Miseon: All right, all right. Okay, so in this dialogue, 진짜 씻었어? (jinjja ssiseosseo?) did you really wash up?
Keith: No, I have been … I don’t know if I did. But then I did think it’s a universal thing that kids don’t like to wash themselves like you and me. Yah, we’re grownups, we are clean and very responsible, and sanitary people. I hope.
Miseon: All right, sanitary people, I like that. Okay.
Keith: But, I think I smell something.
Miseon: Oh me too, I think probably you.
Keith: I think it is me.
Miseon: May be probably me too, I had a perfume in the morning, so …
Keith: A good smell, Okay.
Miseon: Right, Okay.
Keith: But you know traditionally in Korea, wasn’t there something about cleaning I think? Right?
Miseon: Yeah, yeah but in Korea, maybe our ancestors place a huge importance on washing. There are various ways to describe washing.
Keith: Yeah, there are a lot of different ways. People use different verbs for washing their hair, washing their face, and washing their clothes.
Miseon: Yeah, I am just wondering why so many different verbs we have for washing, Right?
Keith: I think you know, generally speaking, Korean people are very clean. If you go to someone’s house, there is - not necessarily like clean clean, but they don’t like dust, you know. Put a lot of emphasis on cleaning. I am sure if I go to your house it’ll be very clean.
Miseon: No. I don’t think so.
Keith: Well, you aren't an artist after all.
Miseon: Well.
Keith: Curious, artist, A Korean artist’s home.
Miseon: Yeah, you know, you can imagine very messed up. Okay.
Keith: But, yeah. There is definitely a lot of different verbs, and how about we take a look at them
Miseon: 네 (ne).
VOCAB LIST
Keith: All right, so the first word is...
Miseon: 냄새 (naemsae) [natural native speed]
Keith: smell
Miseon: 냄새 (naemsae) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 냄새 (naemsae) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 어제 (eoje) [natural native speed]
Keith: yesterday
Miseon: 어제 (eoje) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 어제 (eoje) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 거짓말 (geojinmal) [natural native speed]
Keith: lie
Miseon: 거짓말 (geojinmal) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 거짓말 (geojinmal) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 씻다 (ssitda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to wash, to wash up, to wash oneself
Miseon: 씻다 (ssitda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 씻다 (ssitda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 세수하다 (sesuhada) [natural native speed]
Keith: to wash one's face
Miseon: 세수하다 (sesuhada) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 세수하다(sesuhada) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 진짜 (jinjja) [natural native speed]
Keith: really
Miseon: 진짜 (jinjja) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 진짜 (jinjja) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 이 (i) [natural native speed]
Keith: teeth
Miseon: 이 (i) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 이 (i) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 닦다 (dakda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to wipe (with a cloth)
Miseon: 닦다 (dakda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 닦다 (dakda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 머리 (meori) [natural native speed]
Keith: head
Miseon: 머리 (meori) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 머리 (meori) [natural native speed]
Keith: And, finally.
Miseon: 빨리 (ppalli) [natural native speed]
Keith: fast, quickly
Miseon: 빨리 (ppalli) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 빨리 (ppalli) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right, now we are going to take a deeper look at some other words and phrases from this lesson.
Miseon: The first word we’ll to look at is 냄새 (naemsae).
Keith: Smell.
Miseon: 냄새, 냄새. (naemsae, naemsae.)
Keith: All right, so let’s think about how you would actually use this word. How do you say “a good smell”, what’s a good smell?
Miseon: 좋은 냄새 (joeun naemsae).
Keith: 좋은 냄새 (joeun naemsae). good, then how about a bad smell, something that’s really really stinky.
Miseon: You, 나쁜 냄새 (nappeun naemsae).
Keith: And, one more time that’s 나쁜 냄새 (nappeun naemsae). And just where you say it smells, it doesn’t mean that it’s a pleasant smell. It is the same in Korean, if you just say...
Miseon: 냄새 나 (naemsae na), or 냄새 나요 (naemsae nayo).
Keith: It means it smells or it stinks. So usually, this is talking about a bad smell.
Miseon: That’s right.
Keith: All right, so what’s the next word?
Miseon: 머리 (meori)
Keith: Head, hair.
Miseon: 머리 (meori), 머리 (meori).
Keith: and actually a lot of people ask: Hey, if 머리 (meori) is both head and hair, how do you differentiate the two?
Miseon: of course from the context.
Keith: And it might sound difficult, but it’s actually pretty obvious.
Miseon: 네 (ne), for example, if you wash your 머리 (meori) you’re almost always washing your hair.
Keith: Yeah, and if your 머리 (meori) is hurting, it probably means you have a headache; your hair is not hurting. So just like that, you’re inferring from context, and yeah, should be pretty easy I think.
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: All right, shall we move on to the focus for this lesson?
Miseon: 주십니다! (jusimnida!)

Lesson focus

Keith: So Miseon, what’s the focus of this lesson?
Miseon: The focus of this lesson is how to make sentences in the past tense, using the expressions for "to wash" and "to brush one's teeth".
Keith: Okay, as in the example:
Miseon: 씻었어? (ssiseosseo?)
Keith: Did you wash up?
Miseon: In Korean, to make a sentence into this past tense you add -았어, -었어 (-asseo, -eosseo), or -였어 (-yeosseo) at the end of a verb stem.
Keith: Right, it is not very difficult to understand how it works after some practice. So we’ll practice making past tense sentences, using the words related to washing up.
Miseon: 네 좋아요 (ne joayo).
Keith: So how do you say “to wash up”, generally to wash up?
Miseon: 씻다 (ssitda). 씻다 (ssitda) is the verb that means to wash, and from 씻다 (ssitda) you can read of 다 (da) at the end, and you have 씻 (ssit), so you add -었어 (eosseo) to make the past tense.
Keith: So 씻다 (ssitda) becomes 씻었어 (ssiseosseo).
Miseon: 네 (ne), if you want to be polite, say 씻었어요. (ssiseosseoyo.)
Keith: I washed it.
Miseon: And if you want to ask "did you wash?" You can say
Keith: 씻었어? (ssiseosseo?)
Miseon: Or 씻었어요? (ssiseosseoyo?) ... Keith, 씻었어요? (ssiseosseoyo?)
Keith: Today you shouldn’t have asked me that question if I washed up or not. Maybe tomorrow will be a better day. I’m just kidding.
Miseon: Oh my god! That’s why he stinks
Keith: It’s a joke, 농담어요 (nongdameoyo). I hope everyone believes me.
Miseon: Okay, you can also add objects in front.
Keith: Yeah, that’s right, you can add objects in the front. Let’s take some examples. I washed my hands.
Miseon: 손을 씻었어요. (soneul ssiseosseoyo.)
Keith: Right, if you noticed, the object comes in front, that’s hand washed. How about “I washed the cup?”
Miseon: 컵을 씻었어요. (keobeul ssiseosseoyo.)
Keith: Once again, the cup; the word is in front, the object. And the verb 씻다 (ssitda) when used alone can also mean “to wash oneself”, “to wash up”. Just like the dialogue for this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne), in the dialogue it was used like 씻었어? (ssiseosseo?)
Keith: “Did you wash up?”
Miseon: 네, 씻었어요 (ne, ssiseosseoyo).
Keith: “Yes, I washed up.”
Miseon: 진짜 씻었어? (jinjja ssiseosseo?)
Keith: “Did you really wash up?” Okay, on to our next focus.
Miseon: The next focus is how to say “to wash one’s hair”.
Keith: So you can’t say 머리를 씻다 (meorireul ssitda) in Korean, your head washed. Even though 씻다 (ssitda) means “to wash.”
Miseon: Why not? I want to use that. No, I’m kidding. So you have to say 머리를 감다 (meorireul gamda).
Keith: Yeah, so we are actually using a totally different verb over there, even though 씻다 (ssitda) means to wash, but for hair we are talking about...
Miseon: 머리를 감다 (meorireul gamda).
Keith: Okay, so let’s make a past tense sentence, so again to wash ones hair.
Miseon: 머리를 감다 (meorireul gamda)
Keith: And, let’s change that to the past tense, once again we add -았어, -었어, (-asseo, -eosseo,_) or -였어 (-yeosseo), depending, and how do we do that?
Miseon: 머리를 감았어 (meorireul gamasseo).
Keith: “I washed my hair”, and how do we say that more politely?
Miseon: 머리를 감았어요 (meorireul gamasseoyo).
Keith: All right, excellent job. Now we just have one more expression left.
Miseon: This is perhaps more important than washing your hair.
Keith: Okay what’s that? Never compare the importance of washing hair and washing other things, but what is more important than washing your hair?
Miseon: You said that you like sanitary people. And you want to be sanitary, like clean people, right?
Keith: Yeah.
Miseon: So to do so, brush your teeth.
Keith: It’s pretty important.
Miseon: Very important.
Keith: So how do you say “to brush one’s teeth”?
Miseon: 이를 닦다 (ireul dakda)
Keith: 이를 닦다 (ireul dakda)
Miseon: In 이를 닦다 , 닦다 (ireul dakda , dakda) literally means “to wipe”, and 이 means “teeth”.
Keith: So you’re wiping, polishing your teeth with a toothbrush and a tooth paste.
Miseon: 네 (ne), and as we’re working on the past tense you add -았어 (asseo) at the end of the verb stem.
Keith: Okay, So help us do it, how do you say: To brush one’s teeth again?
Miseon: 이를 닦다 (ireul dakda)
Keith: And we’re changing now to the past tense, I brushed my teeth.
Miseon: 이를 닦았어. (ireul dakkasseo.)
Keith: And what’s a little more politely?
Miseon: 이를 닦았어요. (ireul dakkasseoyo.)
Keith: Just add 요 (yo) at the end.
Miseon: 네. (ne.)

Outro

Keith: Okay, some of our listeners already know about the most powerful tool at KoreanClass101.com.
Miseon: Line by line audio.
Keith: The perfect tool for rapidly improving listening comprehension.
Miseon: By listening to lines of the conversation again and again.
Keith: Listen until every word and syllable becomes clear. Basically, we break down the dialogue into comprehensible bite size sentences
Miseon: You can try the line-by-line audio in the premium learning centre at koreanclass101.com.
Keith: All right, well, everyone thanks for listening. We hope you stay clean.
Miseon: Yes, stay clean clean clean. Bye everyone.
Keith: Okay, bye.

Grammar

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54 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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"Did you wash well when you were lille kids?" :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:25 AM
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Hi rio,


You're very welcome! Please let us know if you have any other inquiries.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

rio
Sunday at 03:50 AM
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Lyn선생님, 정말 고맙습니다! I didn't even think to put '도' in there - thank you for pointing that out 😄

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 03:12 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello rio,


Thank you for commenting! Let's take a look at what you wrote:


네! 어렸을 때 매일 몸을 씻고 머리를 감고 이를 닦았어요. 좋은 냄새

-->네! 어렸을 때 매일 몸을 씻고 머리를 감고 이도 닦았어요. 그래서 항상 좋은 냄새가 났어요.


'도' means 'also'.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

rio
Monday at 01:46 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

네! 어렸을 때 매일 몸을 씻고 머리를 감고 이를 닦았어요. 😇좋은 냄새 ❤️️haha

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 11:25 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Cookie,


Thanks for posting.

If the last syllable of the stem contains the vowels ㅗ or ㅏ, then 았 is added.

If the last syllable of the stem contains any vowel other than ㅗ or ㅏ, and is not a 하다 verb then 었 is added.

Any verb or adjective that ends in 하다, you use 였.


Hope this was of help.

Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Cookie
Saturday at 07:25 PM
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In what different situations do we use -았어, -었어, and -였어?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:03 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Goryo,


Thanks for posting helpful advice. Please let us know if you have any questions.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Goryo
Thursday at 08:50 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

A tip for my fellow students:


Be realistic with your expectations on how much to absorb in a day.


I wanted to type in Korean that I am scared of the advanced lessons, then realized /i have a 25% chance of getting it right. I recall the lesson about the speaker saying he or she was scared of going through with the bungee jumping. It could have been:

a. mugoweo

b. musoweo

c. mugosoweo

d. musogoweo

e. I give up


Hmmm, maybe from 0 to 20% chance of being correct then. At least I know that I need the bungee jumping conversation/lesson to find out.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:50 PM
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Hi Goryo,


Thanks for posting. Our advanced lessons are great, right? Have fun checking them out!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Goryo
Sunday at 10:54 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Lyn and Nathan,


I just read about that verb 씻기다, a causative verb. Looks like an advanced lesson. Looking forward to it.


Hope the cat has forgiven you, brah.


Goryo