Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Miseon: 안녕하세요 여러분 (annyeonghaseyo yeoreobun) KoreanClass101.com입니다 (imnida).
Keith: Hey, I am Keith, welcome to newbie series season 4, lesson 19; “The Best Way to Assure You Aren’t Left Out of Any Plans in Korea!” And I’m joined here by Miseon.
Miseon: 안녕하세요 여러분. (annyeonghaseyo yeoreobun.) Welcome back to koreanclass101.com
Keith: All right, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Miseon: In this lesson, we learn how to talk about plans.
Keith: Where does this conversation take place?
Miseon: It takes place on the phone.
Keith: And who’s this conversation between?
Miseon: The conversation is between a married couple.
Keith: And both the husband and wife are speaking polite language to each other.
Miseon: it's kind of weird in Korean way, but yes, it's 존댓말 이요. (jondaenmal iyo.)
Keith: Listeners, I have a question.
Miseon: A question?
Keith: Yup, I want to know when was the last time you commented.
Miseon: Yes, Great question.
Keith: Stop by koreanclass101.com, leave us a comment or just say hi. Are you ready to listen to this very polite couple?
Miseon: 그럼요 준비 됐어요 (geureomyo junbi dwaesseoyo)
DIALOGUE
부인 (buin): 여보세요. 여보, 오늘 밖에서 밥 먹을 거예요? (yeoboseyo. yeobo, oneul bakk-eseo bap meogeul geo-yeyo?)
남편 (nampyeon): 음... 아직 모르겠어요. (eum... ajik moreugesseoyo.)
부인 (buin): 음... 집에 일찍 올 거예요? (eum... jib-e iljjik ol geo-yeyo?)
남편 (nampyeon): 음... 아직 모르겠어요. 왜요? (eum... ajik moreugesseoyo. waeyo?)
부인 (buin): 오늘 회식 안 해요? (oneul hoesik an haeyo?)
남편 (nampyeon): 회식? 왜요? (hoesik? waeyo?)
부인 (buin): 아니에요… (anieyo…)
남편 (nampyeon): 왜요? 밖에 나갈 거예요? (waeyo? bakk-e nagal geo-yeyo?)
부인 (buin): 아니요... 밥 하기 싫어요… (aniyo... bap hagi sireoyo…)
Miseon: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
부인 (buin): 여보세요. 여보, 오늘 밖에서 밥 먹을 거예요? (yeoboseyo. yeobo, oneul bakk-eseo bap meogeul geo-yeyo?)
남편 (nampyeon): 음... 아직 모르겠어요. (eum... ajik moreugesseoyo.)
부인 (buin): 음... 집에 일찍 올 거예요? (eum... jib-e iljjik ol geo-yeyo?)
남편 (nampyeon): 음... 아직 모르겠어요. 왜요? (eum... ajik moreugesseoyo. waeyo?)
부인 (buin): 오늘 회식 안 해요? (oneul hoesik an haeyo?)
남편 (nampyeon): 회식? 왜요? (hoesik? waeyo?)
부인 (buin): 아니에요… (anieyo…)
남편 (nampyeon): 왜요? 밖에 나갈 거예요? (waeyo? bakk-e nagal geo-yeyo?)
부인 (buin): 아니요... 밥 하기 싫어요… (aniyo... bap hagi sireoyo…)
Miseon: 영어로 한번더. (yeongeoro hanbeondeo.)
Keith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
부인 (buin): 여보세요. 여보, 오늘 밖에서 밥 먹을 거예요? (yeoboseyo. yeobo, oneul bakk-eseo bap meogeul geo-yeyo?)
Keith: Hello. Honey, are you going to eat outside today?
남편 (nampyeon): 음... 아직 모르겠어요. (eum... ajik moreugesseoyo.)
Keith: Hmm...I don't know yet.
부인 (buin): 음... 집에 일찍 올 거예요? (eum... jib-e iljjik ol geo-yeyo?)
Keith: Hmm...Are you going to come home early?
남편 (nampyeon): 음... 아직 모르겠어요. 왜요? (eum... ajik moreugesseoyo. waeyo?)
Keith: Well, I don't know yet. Why?
부인 (buin): 오늘 회식 안 해요? (oneul hoesik an haeyo?)
Keith: There's no company dinner today?
남편 (nampyeon): 회식? 왜요? (hoesik? waeyo?)
Keith: Company dinner? Why?
부인 (buin): 아니에요… (anieyo…)
Keith: Nothing...
남편 (nampyeon): 왜요? 밖에 나갈 거예요? (waeyo? bakk-e nagal geo-yeyo?)
Keith: Why? Are you going to go out?
부인 (buin): 아니요... 밥 하기 싫어요… (aniyo... bap hagi sireoyo…)
Keith: No...I don't want to cook.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Miseon: Keith, if your future wife said this to you like I told you not to come home early because she didn’t want to cook, what do you do?
Keith: I wouldn't come home early. I would listen to my wife.
Miseon: All right that's so nice of you.
Keith: And try to order some 짜장면. (jjajangmyeon.)
Miseon: Right right, oh my god I am so craving 짜장면 (jjajangmyeon) right now.
Keith: Let’s get some later.
Miseon: Right.
Keith: Yeah, But nowadays if you don't want to cook there is a lot of things you can just order, such as 짜장면 (jjajangmyeon), right?
Miseon: 네 (ne), 맞아요. (majayo.) What’s your favourite food when you have to order some food in Korea?
Keith: There’s a lot of food that can be delivered to your place, but I think the most famous, we just talked about is 짜장면 (jjajangmyeon), which is black bean noodles. Korean style Chinese food. I like it.
Miseon: 네 (ne). And they’re usually like really quick, right?
Keith: Yeah.
Miseon: Quick delivery, right?
Keith: Definitely, definitely, and actually probably quicker than I can cook something like even if I want to cook some instant 라면 (ramyeon), it might be even faster.
Miseon: Yeah, exactly, yeah, you know you know that.
Keith: Yeah, I know. All right, well, let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson
Miseon: Okay, it’s time for vocab, that’s great.
VOCAB LIST
Keith: The first is...
Miseon: 오늘 (oneul) [natural native speed]
Keith: today
Miseon: 오늘 (oneul) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 오늘 (oneul) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 밖 (bak) [natural native speed]
Keith: outside
Miseon: 밖 (bak) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 밖 (bak) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 밥 (bap) [natural native speed]
Keith: meal, rice
Miseon: 밥 (bap) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 밥 (bap) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 먹다 (meokda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to eat
Miseon: 먹다 (meokda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 먹다 (meokda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 아직 (ajik) [natural native speed]
Keith: not yet, still
Miseon: 아직 (ajik) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 아직 (ajik) [natural native speed]
Keith: After that...
Miseon: 모르다 (moreuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to not know
Miseon: 모르다 (moreuda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 모르다 (moreuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 집 (jip) [natural native speed]
Keith: home
Miseon: 집 (jip) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 집 (jip) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 일찍 (iljjik) [natural native speed]
Keith: early
Miseon: 일찍 (iljjik) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 일찍 (iljjik) [natural native speed]
Keith: After that...
Miseon: 오다 (oda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to come
Miseon: 오다 (oda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 오다 (oda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 회식 (hoesik) [natural native speed]
Keith: company dinner
Miseon: 회식 (hoesik) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 회식 (hoesik) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 나가다 (nagada) [natural native speed]
Keith: to go out, to go outside
Miseon: 나가다 (nagada) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 나가다 (nagada) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 싫다 (silta) [natural native speed]
Keith: to hate, to not want
Miseon: 싫다 (silta) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 싫다 (silta) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right, well. We’re going to take a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne). The first word we’ll look at is 일찍 (iljjik).
Keith: Early.
Miseon: 일찍 (iljjik), 일찍 (iljjik).
Keith: You know, I don’t know why but when I hear the word 일찍 (iljjik), the first thing that I think of is getting up early. Miseon, do you usually get up early? How do you say “to get up early”?
Miseon: Actually I don’t really get up early, but in this case, it’s 일찍 일어나다. (iljjik ireonada.)
Keith: Okay, then how do you say late?
Miseon: 늦게 (neutge)
Keith: All right. Well, how about to get up late?
Miseon: 늦게 일어나다 (neutge ireonada)
Keith: All right. Well, a lot of people get up late after they have this the night before.
Miseon: 회식 (hoesik)
Keith: Company dinner.
Miseon: 회식, 회식. (hoesik, hoesik.)
Keith: All right, now 회식's (hoesik's) 회 (hoe) means “company” or “gathering”, and 식 (sik) means “to eat”, so you get together and eat with your colleagues. So that’s what 회식 (hoesik) is.
Miseon: Do you like Korean style 회식? (hoesik?)
Keith: Doesn’t everybody? It’s great. Isn’t it? All right, let’s move on. It’s a lot of fun for me.
Miseon: It’s actually expansion of working time.
Keith: Yeah, it’s extension.
Miseon: Yeah, sort of, right?
Keith: So kind of have to work.
Miseon: Right.
Keith: Butter up your boss. All right, let’s take a look at the focus of this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne).

Lesson focus

Keith: Miseon-ssi, What’s the focus for this lesson?
Miseon: The focus of this lesson is to learn how to talk about plans.
Keith: As in the example...
Miseon: 집에 일찍 올 거예요? (jibe iljjik ol geoyeyo?)
Keith: “Are you going to come home early?”
Miseon: Yeah, when you talk about what you’re going to do, you use the structure, -ㄹ/을 거야 (-r/eul geoya) or -ㄹ/을 거예요. (-r/eul geoyeyo.)
Keith: Right, this is a basic way to make a sentence in the future tense in Korean. It can be translated as, to be going to, or will.
Miseon: As you probably aware of it by now, -ㄹ/을 거예요 (-r/eul geoyeyo) is more polite than -ㄹ/을 거야. (-r/eul geoya.)
Keith: Okay, and how about we take a look at how to make some sentences?
Miseon: Okay, let’s take 오다 (oda) for example. You add -ㄹ 거예요 (-r geoyeyo) at the end of 오 (o), and it becomes 올 거예요. (ol geoyeyo.)
Keith: I’ll come. How about to go outside?
Miseon: 나가다 (nagada) becomes 나갈 거예요. (nagal geoyeyo.)
Keith: “I will go outside”. All right, so how was the future tense used in the dialogue for this lesson?
Miseon: 오늘 밖에서 밥 먹을 거예요? (oneul bakkeseo bap meogeul geoyeyo?)
Keith: "Are you going to eat outside today?"
Miseon: 집에 일찍 올 거예요? (jibe iljjik ol geoyeyo?)
Keith: "Are you going to come home early?"
Miseon: 밖에 나갈 거예요? (bakke nagal geoyeyo?)
Keith: "Are you going to go outside?" All right, great. How about we take a look at two more sample sentences before we go?
Miseon: All right.
Keith: how do you say, "What are you going to do today?"
Miseon: 오늘 뭐 할 거예요? (oneul mwo hal geoyeyo?)
Keith: And finally, “are you going to have a company dinner tomorrow?”
Miseon: 내일 회식 할 거예요? (naeil hoesik hal geoyeyo?) Hey Keith, 오늘 뭐 할 거예요? (oneul mwo hal geoyeyo?)
Keith: 오늘 일 할 거야 (oneul il hal geoya) I’m going to work.
Miseon: Uh, poor thing.
Keith: It’s life.

Outro

Miseon: Ready to test what you just have learnt?
Keith: Make this lesson’s vocabulary stick by using lesson specific flashcards in the learning centre.
Miseon: There is a reason everyone uses flash cards.
Keith: They work.
Miseon: They really do help memorization.
Keith: You can get the flash cards for this lesson at:
Miseon: KoreanClass101.com
Keith: All right, well, that’s just about does it, thanks for listening.
Miseon: 감사합니다 좋은 하루 되세요 (gamsahamnida joeun haru doeseyo)
Keith: Have a good day, Bye bye.

Grammar

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21 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What do you usaully eat when you don't want to cook? :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:06 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Uttam,


Thanks for posting. I referred you to the website to show you how verbs and adjectives are usually conjugated.

Don't go too deep into 'declarative' and 'declarative conditional', just know that both are used for future tense. The one thing that I can tell you, though, is that the declarative future conditional is a more stronger phrase and shows the intent of the speaker of wanting to do something (when it is a verb). Example:


하겠어 will do something

할 거야 going to do something


So the latter feels more like you are thinking about it but does not show the 'intent' of the speaker as the former phrase does.


Hope this helped somewhat.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Uttam
Sunday at 10:14 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Sorry... I have another question.... In the dongsa site, the verb e.g. is used as 'declarative', 'declarative conditional', 'inquisitive', 'imperative, 'propositive', 'connective if' and 'connective and'. Inquisitive is easy to understand as it is for a question (e.g. 먹었어? 먹었어요?) but the others may need some clarification.

Could you please provide an explanation of the terms with an example?

Thank you again.

Uttam
Sunday at 10:11 AM
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Hi Lyn,

I am trying out dongsa.net. It is quite useful as I said but, I have a basic question.

Politeness levels: In our lessons we refer to 존댓말 (formal) and 반말 (informal) usage. In some lessons we refer as standard and intimate politeness. In the dongsa site there are 4 levels of politeness: informal low (먹어), informal high (먹어요), formal low (먹는다) and formal high (먹습니다). How do I reconcile all this? For your info, I have tried to standardise in my head as casual, informal politeness, standard politeness and formal politeness. Could you please provide some guidance as to what's the best way forward?

Thank you.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 01:04 AM
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Hi Uttam,


Glad to be of help! One correction:

친짜-->진짜


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Uttam
Thursday at 08:16 AM
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친짜 좋아요.... dongsa.net!

감사합니다!!

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:15 AM
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Hi Uttam,


Thanks for posting. Try this website:


www.dongsa.net


It will be very helpful!


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Uttam
Saturday at 04:06 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

안녕하세요 선생님.

In order to comprehend the levels of politeness and the tense, I am trying to create a chart of a few verbs. E.g. to do: 하다 > 해요 > 했어요 > 할게요 (std politeness, present, past and future). Similarly I have for formal and intimate politeness.

I have a request.

Could you please provide me present, past and future for politeness levels formal, standard and intimate of the following verbs?

1. 생각하다

2. 싫다

3. 노래하다


감사합니다.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 07:07 PM
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안녕하세요 경호 임 (Rex),


The lesson-specific flashcards only mean that there are flashcards that you can add from the specific vocabulary of a particular lesson.


Sincerely,

레벤테 (Levente)

Team KoreanClass101.com

경호 임 (Rex)
Monday at 09:01 AM
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Hi

Where do I find these 'lesson specific flashcards'? I have making my own but the implication in the audio lesson is that they are already created somewhere.

I am really enjoying Korean101.

regards 경호 (Rex)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 05:25 AM
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Hi Pauline,


Thanks for posting. ~겠다 is used after adjectives or verbs to express will or intention. To make it formal add (스)ㅂ니다 after 겠.

A/V verb stem+~겠다

A/V verb stem+~겠어요

A/V verb stem+~겠(스)ㅂ니다


Hope this was of help!

Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com