Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Miseon: 여러분 안녕하세요 (yeoreobun annyeonghaseyo), KoreanClass101.com입니다. (imnida.)
Keith: Hey, I am Keith, welcome to newbie series season 4, lesson 17; “You’re Very Bad at Speaking Korean But, it’s Easy to Say You’re Good!” Hi, my name is Keith, and I’m joined here by Miseon.
Miseon: 안녕하세요 여러분 (annyeonghaseyo yeoreobun). Welcome back to koreanclass101.com.
Keith: All right, Miseon-ssi, what are we going to learn in this lesson?
Miseon: We are going to learn in this lesson, how to say that you’re good or bad at something.
Keith: All right, and where does this conversation take place?
Miseon: this conversation takes place during an interview and the interviewee wants to be an actor.
Keith: Wow, sounds familiar.
Miseon: Like me. Yeah.
Keith: All right, the conversation is between the interviewer and the interviewee.
Miseon: and therefor, the speakers are speaking polite language.
Keith: 존댓말 (jondaenmal)
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: Listeners, I have a question.
Miseon: A question?
Keith: Yeah, I want to know when was the last time you commented.
Miseon: Yes, great question.
Keith: Stop by koreanclass101.com, leave us a comment or just say hi.
All right, Miseon-ssi, let’s get ready to act.
Miseon: Yeah, I’m excited.
DIALOGUE
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 노래 잘 해요? (norae jal haeyo?
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 아니요. 노래 못 해요. (aniyo. norae mot haeyo.)
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 흠... 춤 잘 춰요? (heum... chum jal chwoyo?)
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 아니요. 춤 못 춰요. (aniyo. chum mot chwoyo.)
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 흠... 그럼 연기 잘 해요? (heum... geureom yeongi jal haeyo?)
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 아... 연기.... 못 해요. (a... yeongi... mot haeyo.)
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 네? 연기 못 해요? (ne? yeongi mot haeyo?)
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 네...하지만 술 잘 마셔요. 그리고 운전도 잘 해요. ( ne... hajiman sul jal masyeoyo. geurigo unjeon-do jal haeyo.)
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 네? 나가요! (ne? nagayo!)
Miseon: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 노래 잘 해요? (norae jal haeyo?
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 아니요. 노래 못 해요. (aniyo. norae mot haeyo.)
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 흠... 춤 잘 춰요? (heum... chum jal chwoyo?)
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 아니요. 춤 못 춰요. (aniyo. chum mot chwoyo.)
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 흠... 그럼 연기 잘 해요? (heum... geureom yeongi jal haeyo?)
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 아... 연기.... 못 해요. (a... yeongi... mot haeyo.)
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 네? 연기 못 해요? (ne? yeongi mot haeyo?)
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 네...하지만 술 잘 마셔요. 그리고 운전도 잘 해요. ( ne... hajiman sul jal masyeoyo. geurigo unjeon-do jal haeyo.)
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 네? 나가요! (ne? nagayo!)
Miseon: 영어로 한번더. (yeongeoro hanbeondeo.)
Keith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 노래 잘 해요? (norae jal haeyo?
Keith: Are you good at singing?
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 아니요. 노래 못 해요. (aniyo. norae mot haeyo.)
Keith: No, I can't sing.
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 흠... 춤 잘 춰요? (heum... chum jal chwoyo?)
Keith: Hmm... Are you good at dancing?
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 아니요. 춤 못 춰요. (aniyo. chum mot chwoyo.)
Keith: Huh? No. I can't dance.
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 흠... 그럼 연기 잘 해요? (heum... geureom yeongi jal haeyo?)
Keith: Hmm... Then are you good at acting?
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 아... 연기.... 못 해요. (a... yeongi... mot haeyo.)
Keith: Ah...acting...I'm not good at it.
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 네? 연기 못 해요? (ne? yeongi mot haeyo?)
Keith: What? You can't act?
배우지망생 (baeujimangsaeng): 네...하지만 술 잘 마셔요. 그리고 운전도 잘 해요. ( ne... hajiman sul jal masyeoyo. geurigo unjeon-do jal haeyo.)
Keith: No...but I drink well. And I can drive well.
면접자 (myeonjeopja): 네? 나가요! (ne? nagayo!)
Keith: What? Get out of here!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Miseon: That’s a funny conversation.
Keith: Yeah, this person is clearly in the wrong interview.
Miseon: I know. I don’t know what he’s thinking in his mind.
Keith: He wants to be an actor but he can’t act.
Miseon: Right, and drink well, drive well.
Keith: What drinking or driving has to do with acting. But … Miseon-ssi, you’re an actor, you like the word actor instead of actress for some reason. You’re an actress, so do you know how the interview or the auditioning process in Korea is like?
Miseon: Well, when I was in Korea, we didn’t have like a really formal auditioning process at that time. But nowadays you know, like music is booming and that specifically musical actually, you have to audition for it, otherwise.
Keith: So back in the day you didn’t …
Miseon: Back in the day no.
Keith: how would you get an acting job.
Miseon: Through the connection and ...
Keith: Just people like you know.
Miseon: Obviously, right right. But nowadays it’s more officially, you know, they process the audition, and then you know.
Keith: Well, there is … in Korea there’s tons of people that want to be actors and actresses.
Miseon: Right.
Keith: They’ve got to find someone, right? somehow. interviews
Miseon: Yes, yes.
Keith: All right, I think it’s time for the vocabulary.
Miseon: Okay.
VOCAB LIST
Keith: What’s the first word we have?
Miseon: 노래 (norae) [natural native speed]
Keith: song
Miseon: 노래 (norae) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 노래 (norae) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 잘 (jal) [natural native speed]
Keith: well
Miseon: 잘 (jal) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 잘 (jal) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 하다 (hada) [natural native speed]
Keith: to do
Miseon: 하다 (hada) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 하다 (hada) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 춤 (chum) [natural native speed]
Keith: dance
Miseon: 춤 (chum) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 춤 (chum) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 추다 (chuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to dance
Miseon: 추다 (chuda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 추다 (chuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 연기 (yeongi) [natural native speed]
Keith: acting
Miseon: 연기 (yeongi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 연기 (yeongi) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 술 (sul) [natural native speed]
Keith: alcohol
Miseon: 술 (sul) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 술 (sul) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 마시다 (masida) [natural native speed]
Keith: to drink
Miseon: 마시다 (masida) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 마시다 (masida) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 운전 (unjeon) [natural native speed]
Keith: driving
Miseon: 운전 (unjeon) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 운전 (unjeon) [natural native speed]
Keith: And finally.
Miseon: 나가다 (nagada) [natural native speed]
Keith: to go out
Miseon: 나가다 (nagada) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 나가다 (nagada) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right, now we’re going to take a closer look at usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne), the first word we’ll look at is 연기 (yeongi)
Keith: Acting.
Miseon: 연기(yeongi), 연기 (yeongi).
Keith: Okay, so 연기 (yeongi) is acting, and how do you say an actor?
Miseon: You can say 연기자 (yeongija), because 자 (ja) means person.
Keith: All right, can we have that one more time please?
Miseon: 연기자 (yeongija) or you can also say 배우 (baeu), that’s Chinese.
Keith: Right, and just like you said, 배우 (baeu) comes from Chinese and 연기자 (yeongija), that’s Korean.
Miseon: 네 (ne), 맞아요. (majayo.)
Keith: But they both are same thing, isn’t it?
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: All right, can we have the Chinese one again one more time?
Miseon: 네 (ne), 배우. (baeu.)
Keith: And just not really quickly, we say Chinese but it’s actually really part of Korean. It’s... it comes from Chinese but it’s in use in everyday Korean.
Miseon: Yeah, that’s true.
Keith: Are you 배우 (baeu), Miseon? I think you are.
Miseon: Of course.
Keith: Do you prefer to call yourself 배우 (baeu) or a 연기자? (yeongija?)
Miseon: Well, I prefer actually 배우 (baeu) because I don’t know why 배우 (baeu) feels better to me, but, you know, it’s like when you say like to learn in Korean, it’s 배우다 (baeuda), right? So I feel like that actually associate me all the time like 배우 (baeu) has to be learned, you know in your whole lifetime, so …
Keith: Okay, so learn and actor, so like a personal preference for you.
Miseon: Right, right.
Keith: All right, what’s the next word we’re going to take a look at?
Miseon: Next word is 운전 (unjeon)
Keith: Driving.
Miseon: 운전, 운전. (unjeon, unjeon.)
Keith: All right, and how do we say that in verb form? How do we say to drive?
Miseon: It’s simple, you just add -하다 (-hada) at the end and it becomes 운전하다. (unjeonhada.)
Keith: All right. Miseon, you’re good at driving? Are you a good driver?
Miseon: Oh my god, don’t ask me. I failed one time.
Keith: Well, if you’re good or you’re bad, that’s Okay. Because we are going to go over how to say that you’re good or bad at something in Korean in our focus for this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne), that’s a fantastic idea. I’m not good at driving.

Lesson focus

Keith: Miseon-ssi, again what’s the focus for this lesson?
Miseon: Yeah, in this lesson the focus is to learn how to say that you’re good or bad at something.
Keith: As in the example:
Miseon: 노래 못 해요 (norae mot haeyo)
Keith: I can’t sing. So, I’m just going to ask you once more, are you good at driving, Miseon?
Miseon: 운전 못 해요. (unjeon mot haeyo.)
Keith: I can’t drive, I’m not good at driving. Okay, so let’s check it out in more detail. How do you say that you’re good or bad at something?
Miseon: 네 (ne), to say that, you can use the word 잘 (ne) or 못 (mot).
Keith: Right, 잘 (jal) literally means “well”, or even “skilfully”.
Miseon: 네 (ne), and 못 (mot) literally means “can’t” or “poorly”. You add these words in front of the main verb of the sentence.
Keith: Okay, so let’s break it down. For example, how do you say “I sing”? Very simple sentence.
Miseon: 노래 해요. (norae haeyo.)
Keith: All right, and this is partly true for me. “I can’t sing”. How do we say that?
Miseon: 노래 못 해요 (norae mot haeyo).
Keith: Okay, there as you can see you just add 못 (mot) and it means you can’t do it.
Miseon: 네 (ne), 맞아요. (majayo.) And if you add 잘 (jal) it means you’re good at it.
Keith: All right. So I want to be good at singing. How would I say, I’m good at singing?
Miseon: 노래 잘 해요. (norae jal haeyo.)
Keith: And again as you can see you just put 잘 (jal) in there, and it means, you can do it well.
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: All right, so how was it used in the dialogue for this lesson?
Miseon: 춤 잘 춰요? (chum jal chwoyo?)
Keith: "Are you good at dancing?"
Miseon: 춤 못 춰요. (chum mot chwoyo.)
Keith: "I can't dance."
Miseon: 그럼 연기 잘 해요? (geureom yeongi jal haeyo?)
Keith: "Then can you dance well?"
Miseon: 연기 못 해요? (yeongi mot haeyo?)
Keith: "You can't act?"
Miseon: 하지만 술 잘 마셔요. 그리고 운전도 잘 해요. (hajiman sul jal masyeoyo. geurigo unjeondo jal haeyo.)
Keith: "But I drink well, And I can drive well, too." All right, now before we wrap this up, let’s look at some more sample sentences.
Miseon: 네 (ne). Okay, please give me the English again.
Keith: All right, will give you the English, you give me the Korean. “I can’t cook.”
Miseon: 요리 못 해요. (yori mot haeyo.)
Keith: And, “I’m good at English.”
Miseon: 영어 잘 해요. (yeongeo jal haeyo.) I just want to ask you Keith, 뭐 잘 해요? (mwo jal haeyo?)
Keith: Man, this is a hard question, because I’m not good at anything.
Miseon: What? What?
Keith: Well, I could say 배구 잘 해요 (baegu jal haeyo), “I’m good at volleyball”.
Miseon: Oh, great.
Keith: Well, I used to be. That was a long time ago.
Miseon: But, still.
Keith: How about yourself? 뭐 잘 해요? (mwo jal haeyo?)
Miseon: 한국어 잘 해요. (hangugeo jal haeyo.)
Keith: I’m good at Korean. That’s not fair.

Outro

Keith: All right, well, how about you our listeners, why don’t you stop by and let us know what you’re good at, what you’re not good at?
Miseon: 뭐 잘 해요? (mwo jal haeyo?) or 뭐 못 해요? (mwo mot haeyo?) Ready to test what you just have learnt?
Keith: Make this lesson’s vocabulary stick by using lesson specific flashcards in the learning centre.
Miseon: There is a reason everyone uses flash cards.
Keith: They work.
Miseon: They really do help memorization.
Keith: You can get the flash cards for this lesson at:
Miseon: KoreanClass101.com
Keith: Okay, well, that’s just about does it, thanks for listening everyone.
Miseon: 안녕히 가세요 여러분! (annyeonghi gaseyo yeoreobun!)

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27 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Can you tell us what you're good at? :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:57 AM
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Hi Uttam,


Thanks for posting. Let's take a look at what you wrote:



저는 잘 영어 말해요. I can speak English well.

-->저는 영어를 잘 해요. (어 in 영어 means language, so no need to say 말)


나는 빨리 잘 배어해요. I am a fast learner.

-->저는 빨리 배워요.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

맞아요? 감사합니다.

Uttam
Sunday at 02:04 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I missed the word 영어 below.

I can speak English well - 저는 잘 영어 말해요.

맞아요?

Uttam
Friday at 09:34 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

안녕하세요 선생님.


Here are a couple of things I am good at (잘 해요):

저는 잘 말해요. I can speak English well.

나는 빨리 잘 배어해요. I am a fast learner.


맞아요? 감사합니다.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 06:13 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Giorgio,


Thanks for posting.


Regarding your question on 연기/친구, both words have a slight nasal sound (chingu/yeongi).

And sometimes particles are omitted in colloquial Korean(in this case, the object marking particle eul/reul was omitted), but sometimes people will add the particle (so it is important to know particles, to figure out what was omitted with the assumption that the listener knows what particle was omitted).


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Giorgio
Monday at 11:08 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Two things about the interview:


1. The applicant sounded like a lady but Miseon and Keith referred to her as "he."


2. Drinking and driving skills were important for the roles in "The Fast and the Furious" movies.

Giorgio
Monday at 10:22 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I have two yeon-gi questions:


1. How come in the sample sentence "geu baeu-neun yeongi-reul jal mothaeyo" we are using reul after yeongi when all other phrases with yeongi didn't use it?


2. When yeongi is pronounced, the n and g sounds are distinct but with chingu, it's almost like ching-gu. Are there Pronunciation rules for ~ng~?


Thanks.

KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 10:05 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi 캐캐,


Thanks for posting. Usually, 연기자 refers to both male and female actors, same goes for 배우. If you wanted to say actress you add 여-->여배우, when you want to say actor, usually native Koreans will say 배우 or add 남--:남자배우.


Hope this was of help!


Sincerely,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

캐캐
Wednesday at 12:04 PM
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안녕하세요!


I have a question about the words 배우 and 연기자. In English we have 'actor' and 'actress'. Are the korean words gender neutral or does it specifically mean a male actor?


감사합니다!


캐캐

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 10:19 AM
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Hello Denisse,


Thank you so much for leaving us comments! :) Love your questions!

So here comes the explanation, yay!

First of all, [연기] and [춤] are nouns here, and [연기(를) 하다] and [춤을 추다] are fixed usages. We can see similar occasions in English as well. We wouldn't say "eat medicine", rather we say "take medicine"


Second, [못 (mot)] is an adverb and it immediately precedes verbs. However, [춤] and [연기] are not verbs but are nouns meaning "dance/dancing" and "act/performance", so they are separated from paring verbs and are placed before adverbs. So verbs like [추다] or [하다] are followed by [잘] or [못].


How would you say, "I can't eat Kimchi"?

[못 김치(를) 먹어요.] or [김치(를) 못 먹어요.]


You can tell that the second one sounds more natural, right? [못] must be followed by a verb which is [먹다] in this case.

So [춤] and [연기] are in the same vein with [김치]. :)


Hope it helped!


Best,

Rebecca

Team KoreanClass101.com

Denisse
Thursday at 12:20 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I have another question 😁❤️️❤️️

"그 배우는 연기를 잘 못해요."

What kind of verbal construction is in 연기를? That comes from the verb acting right? Then wat happened with 춤추다? The same thing? You add a 을 with 춤 right? 춤을 못 춰요? Hhhhmmm...

Then... isn't 연기하다 a 하다 verb? Wouldn't be "그 배우는 잘 못 연기해요"?

I think I saw somewhere... something like that type of sentence change the forme verb... like some type of modifier?

Os a modifier what you're using in 춤을 못 춰요 and in 그 배우는 연기를 잘 못해요? Is if it... are there any lessons to learn those here? Again please ❤️️❤️ "그 배우는 잘 못 연기해요" can be ok? And if it cannot be ok, then why is not ok? 😳😳😳😳😳😳😳

I'll be really thankful if you can answer this and my previous question, please

Thank you before hand 👍❤️️ K-Class101최고입니다. n.n