Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Miseon: 안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo), KoreanClass101.com입니다. (imnida.)
Keith: Hey, I am Keith, welcome to newbie series season 4, lesson 12; Counting People in Korean – “How Many People Want Ice Cream?”
Miseon: Hello everyone, I’m Miseon, and welcome to koreanclass101.com.
Keith: With us you will learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Miseon: We also provide you with culture insights.
Keith: And tips you won’t find in a text book.
All right, So, what are we going to learn how to say in this lesson?
Miseon: I want to have five ice creams. In this lesson we’ll learn how to count people in Korean.
Keith: Okay, and this conversation takes place.
Miseon: In a classroom.
Keith: The conversation is between:
Miseon: 선생님 (seonsaengnim) and 학생. (haksaeng.)
Keith: The teacher and the students. And of course it’s pretty obvious they’re in a classroom. So what kind of language are they going to be using?
Miseon: 존댓말 이요. (jondaenmal iyo.)
Keith: Nothing is more importantly. It’s the teacher and the students, that’s what’s important.
Miseon: Yeah.
Keith: Now before you listen to the conversation.
Miseon: We want to ask.
Keith: Do you read the lesson notes while you listen?
Miseon: Seeing the Korean definitely helps.
Keith: if you have tried it.
Miseon: What do you think of it?
Keith: You can leave us feedback in the comments section of this lesson. All right. So, let’s listen into the conversation.
Miseon: 네 (ne). 들어보세요! (deureoboseyo!)
DIALOGUE
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 여러분. 간식을 가져왔어요. (yeoreobun. gansik-eul gajyeowasseoyo.)
학생 (haksaeng): 뭐뭐 있어요? (mwomwo isseoyo?)
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 빵하고, 아이스크림 있어요. (ppang-hago, aiseukeurim isseoyo.)
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 빵 먹을 사람? 한 명, 두 명, 세 명, 네 명, 다섯 명, 여섯 명... 오케이. 여섯 명. (ppang meogeul saram? han myeong, du myeong, se myeong, daseot myeong, yeoseot myeong... okei. yeoseot myeong.)
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 그리고, 아이스크림 먹을 사람? 한 명, 두 명, 세 명. 오케이. 세 명! 나머지는 선생님이 다 먹을 거예요. (geurigo, aiseukeurim meogeul saram? han myeong, du myeong, se myeong. okei. se myeong! nameoji-neun seonsaengnim-i da meogeul geo-yeyo.)
Miseon: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 여러분. 간식을 가져왔어요. (yeoreobun. gansik-eul gajyeowasseoyo.)
학생 (haksaeng): 뭐뭐 있어요? (mwomwo isseoyo?)
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 빵하고, 아이스크림 있어요. (ppang-hago, aiseukeurim isseoyo.)
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 빵 먹을 사람? 한 명, 두 명, 세 명, 네 명, 다섯 명, 여섯 명... 오케이. 여섯 명. (ppang meogeul saram? han myeong, du myeong, se myeong, daseot myeong, yeoseot myeong... okei. yeoseot myeong.)
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 그리고, 아이스크림 먹을 사람? 한 명, 두 명, 세 명. 오케이. 세 명! 나머지는 선생님이 다 먹을 거예요. (geurigo, aiseukeurim meogeul saram? han myeong, du myeong, se myeong. okei. se myeong! nameoji-neun seonsaengnim-i da meogeul geo-yeyo.)
Miseon: 영어로 한번더. (yeongeoro hanbeondeo.)
Keith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 여러분. 간식을 가져왔어요. (yeoreobun. gansik-eul gajyeowasseoyo.)
Keith: Everyone, I brought you some snacks.
학생 (haksaeng): 뭐뭐 있어요? (mwomwo isseoyo?)
Keith: What do you have?
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 빵하고, 아이스크림 있어요. (ppang-hago, aiseukeurim isseoyo.)
Keith: We have bread and ice cream.
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 빵 먹을 사람? 한 명, 두 명, 세 명, 네 명, 다섯 명, 여섯 명... 오케이. 여섯 명. (ppang meogeul saram? han myeong, du myeong, se myeong, daseot myeong, yeoseot myeong... okei. yeoseot myeong.)
Keith: Who wants to eat bread? One, two, three, four, five, six...okay. Six people.
선생님 (seonsaengnim): 그리고, 아이스크림 먹을 사람? 한 명, 두 명, 세 명. 오케이. 세 명! 나머지는 선생님이 다 먹을 거예요. (geurigo, aiseukeurim meogeul saram? han myeong, du myeong, se myeong. okei. se myeong! nameoji-neun seonsaengnim-i da meogeul geo-yeyo.)
Keith: And who wants to eat ice cream? One, two, three. Okay. Three people. I'll eat all the rest of it.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Miseon: Keith, you’ve grown up in America, do you also think bread is just a snack?
Keith: No, actually bread to me is not a snack. It’s actually food, you know you eat it at dinner, dinner rules and, you know, of course I grow up in a Korean home, but I grow up in America’s also. To me bread it’s not a snack, it is food, you go to dinner you eat bread.
Miseon: Okay, my case bread is a snack. Because I have to eat rice, even after eating bread. I don’t know why, because I feel my stomach is empty after bread.
Keith: So you have to eat rice.
Miseon: Yeah, no matter what I have bread, I have to eat rice.
Keith: Yeah, actually I think I know where you’re getting that. So in Korea bread is considered more of a snack that it is food.
Miseon: Right, that’s true.
Keith: Because rice is what’s food and bread is just you know, have it in between meals something really quick to eat.
Miseon: Yeah, that’s true. So, especially like the old people think that bread is just snack, like 간식 (gansik).
Keith: Snack, right. So most people in the older generations in Korea, they think that bread is a snack. What about the younger generation though?
Miseon: Right, so I’m the old generation then. That’s what are you saying right?
Keith: No, I didn’t say that.
Miseon: Oh, Keith, you are saying that I’m old generation.
Keith: Well, Actually I think even the younger generation too they consider bread a snack as well.
Miseon: No, I don’t like you. Thank you so much. Okay, more and more people just have sandwiches or hamburgers, but still parents always tell their kids you’re never going to get enough energy if you just eat bread, you should eat rice and rice side dishes.
Keith: Yeah, 반찬 (banchan), which is kind of true because Korean people they never eat rice on its own, always with 반찬 (banchan).
Miseon: 잘, 반찬 너무 좋아요. (jal, banchan neomu joayo.)
Keith: All right, so let’s take a look at the vocab for this lesson.
Miseon: 잘, 들어보세요. (jal, deureoboseyo.)
VOCAB LIST
Keith: First word we have is...
Miseon: 간식 (gansik) [natural native speed]
Keith: snack
Miseon: 간식 (gansik) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 간식 (gansik) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next we have...
Miseon: 가져오다 (gajyeooda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to bring
Miseon: 가져오다 (gajyeooda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 가져오다 (gajyeooda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next we have...
Miseon: 빵 (ppang) [natural native speed]
Keith: bread
Miseon: 빵 (ppang) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 빵 (ppang) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 아이스크림 (aiseukeurim) [natural native speed]
Keith: ice cream
Miseon: 아이스크림 (aiseukeurim) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 아이스크림 (aiseukeurim) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 먹다 (meokda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to eat
Miseon: 먹다 (meokda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 먹다 (meokda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 명 (myeong) [natural native speed]
Keith: counter for people (non-honorific)
Miseon: 명 (myeong) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 명 (myeong) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 나머지 (nameoji) [natural native speed]
Keith: the rest (of the whole)
Miseon: 나머지 (nameoji) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 나머지 (nameoji) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 선생님 (seonsaengnim) [natural native speed]
Keith: teacher
Miseon: 선생님 (seonsaengnim) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 선생님 (seonsaengnim) [natural native speed]
Keith: And finally.
Miseon: 다 (da) [natural native speed]
Keith: all, everything
Miseon: 다 (da) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 다 (da) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: Okay, so let’s have a closer look for the usage for some of the words and phrases for this lesson.
Miseon: The first word we’ll look at is 간식 (gansik)
Keith: Snack.
Miseon: 간식, 간식. (gansik, gansik.)
Keith: So 간식 means snack, but the origin of the word is kind of interesting, isn’t that?
Miseon: 간식's (gansik's) 간 (gan) means “between” and 식 (sik) means “eating” or “food”, so 간식 (gansik) means food that you eat between meals.
Keith: Thus snack. So, what’s your favourite 간식 (gansik), Miseon?
Miseon: My favourite 간식 (gansik), 귀여워 (gwiyeowo) chocolate.
Keith: Chocolate, just chocolate.
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: Oh, mine is kind of similar, mine is Choco pie.
Miseon: Ah, 초코파이 저도 좋아해요. (chokopai jeodo joahaeyo.)
Keith: And for those of you wondering those are in English, Moon pies.
Miseon: Okay.
Keith: All right, Miseon-ssi, what’s the next word?
Miseon: 나머지 (nameoji).
Keith: Rest, remainder, the other ones.
Miseon: 나머지 (nameoji), 나머지 (nameoji).
Keith: So, how do you use this word together with other words?
Miseon: 나머지 (nameoji) is the rest, so if you want to use this word with other words you generally put 나머지 (nameoji) before other nouns.
Keith: For example:
Miseon: 나머지 사람들. (nameoji saramdeul.)
Keith: The rest of the people.
Miseon: 나머지 시간. (nameoji sigan.)
Keith: The rest of the time. All right, good now, how about for the rest of this lesson, let’s take a look at the focus for this lesson.
Miseon: Sure, let’s go.

Lesson focus

Keith: All right, so Miseon, what’s the focus for this lesson?
Miseon: 네 (ne), the focus of this lesson is how to count people in Korean.
Keith: Yeah, in Korean there are a lot of counters for different objects.
Miseon: 네 (ne), for counting people, the word 명 (myeong) is generally used.
Keith: Right, but in Korean there are two different number systems.
Miseon: 네 (ne). Native Korean numbers and Sino Korean numbers. And usually when counting people, native Korean numbers like 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯 (hana, dul, set, net, daseot) are used.
Keith: Usually not always?
Miseon: Not always. When the number gets bigger or in formal occasions, Sino-Korean numbers like 일 이 삼 사 오… (il i sam sa o…) are used as well.
Keith: Okay, so let’s slow down a bit and count together, how about we start with one person.
Miseon: 한 명 (han myeong)
Keith: Tow people.
Miseon: 두 명 (du myeong)
Keith: Three people.
Miseon: 세 명 (se myeong)
Keith: And can you continue on please?
Miseon: 네 명, 다섯 명, 여섯 명, 일곱 명, 여덟 명, 아홉 명, 열 명, 열한 명, 열두 명, 열세 명, 열네 명, 열다섯 명, 열여섯 명, 열일곱 명, 열여덟 명, 열아홉 명, 스무 명! (ne myeong, daseot myeong, yeoseot myeong, ilgop myeong, yeodeol myeong, ahop myeong, yeol myeong, yeolhan myeong, yeoldu myeong, yeolse myeong, yeolle myeong, yeoldaseot myeong, yeoryeoseot myeong, yeorilgop myeong, yeoryeodeol myeong, yeorahop myeong, seumu myeong!)
Keith: You did it! Awesome, great job! Miseon-ssi, thanks for taking one for the team.
Miseon: 감사니다 (gamsanida).
Keith: Really tired, you’re out of breath. But that was up to 20 people.
Miseon: But sometimes you can also use 사람 (saram).
Keith: Instead of 명 (myeong) you mean?
Miseon: 네 (ne). Like--
Keith: Okay, so for example:
Miseon: Like 한 사람, 두 사람, 세 사람, 네 사람 (han saram, du saram, se saram, ne saram), etc...
Keith: Okay, so it’s really up to the person, but generally we use 명 (myeong).
Miseon: 네 (ne). Generally 명 (myeong). Right, But, I’m afraid there’s one more thing to know.
Keith: Oh no, it sounds scary, but don’t worry. Our listeners are very good students.
Miseon: I’m sure, so here you go. When you want to be honorific, you can use the word 분 (bun).
Keith: So, instead of the word 명 (myeong) use the word 분 (bun).
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: Such as:
Miseon: 한 분, 두 분, 세 분, 네 분 (han bun, du bun, se bun, ne bun), etc...

Outro

Keith: Okay, Now don’t forget to stop by KoreanClass101.com and pick up the lesson notes.
Miseon: It has the conversation transcript.
Keith: Vocabs., sample sentences, and grammar explanation.
Miseon: And a culture insights section.
Keith: Seeing the Korean.
Miseon: Really helps you remember faster.
Keith: But don’t take our word for it. Please have a look for yourself.
Miseon: And let us know what you think.
Keith: All right, so thanks again for being here with us, Miseon, thank you for lending us your talents, you’ve so many talents, and thank you we’ll see you next time. Bye bye.
Miseon: 감사니다 (gamsanida) to you as well. 안녕히 계세요 여러분! (annyeonghi gyeseyo yeoreobun!)

Grammar

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34 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What's your favorite snack? :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:07 AM
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Hi Gustavo,


Thanks for posting. Korean has informal and formal expressions, and formal expressions are also referred to as 'honorifics' (they 'honor' the other person, aka they use polite speech. So expressions that end with 'yo' or 'seumnida/imnida', etc., would be considered honorific or polite.

Hope this answered your question.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Gustavo
Wednesday at 03:33 AM
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Hello,


What is this "honorific" thing that Miseon said about?

Is it a more polite version or what?

I've seen about this a couple of times but I never found a place that explained what this "honorific" means (like in this lesson and in the verb conjugation chart, specially the conjugations made me very confused about it, since I didn't found any explanation anywhere yet)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:01 AM
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Hi Giorgio,


Thank you for commenting. The 'da' form is a very informal one and can be used when one is talking to oneself or casually. If you want it to be more formal you conjugate, and make the form informal-formal (~yo), or formal (imnida/seumnida).

Hope this was of help.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Giorgio
Sunday at 11:57 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

This lesson has been very generous with "sub-lessons" too.

빵 먹을 사람. = A person who eats bread.


Just substitute ppang with any other food, and you're able to communicate that such a person eats that kind of food.


Bulgogi mogeul saram etc.


Nice material, Innovative Language.

Giorgio
Sunday at 10:26 AM
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Sejina, I read your response to Lillia about and or with using rang/irang/hago/wa and picked up much. Hopefully I'll retain them.


I noticed all your sample sentences ended in ~da or ~다. What situations don't require conjugations?


I hear or see people on TV shows or movies exclaim, 'Waahh! Yeppeuda!" but in the lessons there's ayo/asseoyo and

eoyo/eosseoyo. Wouldn't it be awesome if no conjugations were needed ?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 02:43 AM
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Hi Marisa,


Thanks for posting. '뭐 뭐' and '뭐' both mean 'what', but if you use it twice, it would be used when the speaker is a bit more excited or anxious to know what's going on. Otherwise, there is no difference.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Marisa
Sunday at 01:01 PM
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Hi there! I was wondering what the difference between say "뭐뭐" and just "뭐" is? Do they both just mean "what"?


Thank you!

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 12:08 AM
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Hi Lilia,


Thanks for your comment.


하고, 와/과, (이)랑 can be used interchangeably to mean “with”.

'와' is attached to words ending in vowels and '과' is attached to words ending in consonants.

e.g. 나는 언니와 점심을 먹었다 (I had lunch with my sister)

우리는 선생님과 여행을 간다 (We are going to go travel with a teacher)


'랑' is attached to words ending in vowels '이랑' is attached to words ending in consonants.

e.g. 나는 친구랑 영화를 봤다 (I watched a movie with my friend)

너는 남동생이랑 비슷하다 (You look similar with your brother)


'하고' can be used to words ending in a vowel or consonant.

e.g. 엄마하고 저녁을 먹는다(I eat dinner with my mom)


However, '그리고' means 'and'.

e.g. 사과 그리고 바나나가 있다 (There are apples and bananas)


I hope it helps,

Thanks!


Sejina

Team KoreanClass101.com


Lilia
Thursday at 10:31 AM
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So far, I have seen four ways to say "and"

-하고

-와/과

-(이)랑

-그리고

Is there a difference between these or are they interchangeable?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 10:01 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

:razz:Hi, Kissja5302. I understood your question, so don't worry about it : )


When Koreans want to emphasize the meaning 'ALL' or 'EVERYTHING', they read the word '다(da)' with strong and long accent. That's why it sounds like 'Ta', not 'da'. Since there is no adverb '타(ta)', people understand that it means 'all'.


So, it is okay if you read the word like 'ta' if you want to emphasize the meaning.


Thank you.