Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Miseon: 안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo), KoreanClass101.com입니다 (imnida).
Keith: Hey, I am Keith, welcome to newbie series season 4, lesson number 11; “What Can You do at the Korean Post Office”
Miseon: Hello everyone, I’m Miseon, and welcome to KoreanClass101.com.
Keith: With us, you will learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Miseon: We also provide you with culture insights.
Keith: And tips you won’t find in a text book.
All right, So, what are we going to learn how to say in this lesson? And of course we are going to learn in Korean.
Miseon: Of course. In this lesson you will learn basic expressions used in a post office.
Keith: Okay, and this conversation, let me guess, does it take place in a post office?
Miseon: of course, you just said that. In a post office.
Keith: All right. So, this conversation is between who?
Miseon: Jeongsu and the staff at the post office.
Keith: And, I’m going to take another guess. Since it’s a customer worker relationship it’s going to be polite language?
Miseon: 네 (ne), 맞아요 (majayo). You’re good.
Keith: I went to school. I’m pretty smart.
Miseon: 네 (ne), of course.
Keith: And they are speaking 존댓말 (jondaenmal).
Miseon: 네 (ne), 존댓말 이요 (jondaenmal iyo).
Keith: Listeners, I have a question.
Miseon: A question?
Keith: Yeah, I want to know when was the last time you commented.
Miseon: Yes, great question.
Keith: Stop by koreanclass101.com, leave us a comment or just say hi.
Miseon: Okay, you heard Keith.
Keith: Okay, let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
직원 (jigwon): 어디에 보낼 거예요? (eodi-e bonael geo-yeyo?)
정수 (Jeongsu): 미국이요. (miguk-iyo.)
직원 (jigwon): 안에 뭐예요? (an-e mwo-yeyo?)
정수 (Jeongsu): 안에요? 책이요. 얼마예요? (an-eyo? chaek-iyo. eolma-yeyo?)
직원 (jigwon): 3만원이에요. (sammanwon-ieyo.)
정수 (Jeongsu): 3만원이요? 며칠 걸려요? (sammanwon-iyo? myeochil geollyeoyo?)
직원 (jigwon): 5일 정도 걸립니다. (o-il jeongdo geollimnida.)
정수 (Jeongsu): 네. 감사합니다. (ne. gamsahamnida.)
Miseon: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
직원 (jigwon): 어디에 보낼 거예요? (eodi-e bonael geo-yeyo?)
정수 (Jeongsu): 미국이요. (miguk-iyo.)
직원 (jigwon): 안에 뭐예요? (an-e mwo-yeyo?)
정수 (Jeongsu): 안에요? 책이요. 얼마예요? (an-eyo? chaek-iyo. eolma-yeyo?)
직원 (jigwon): 3만원이에요. (sammanwon-ieyo.)
정수 (Jeongsu): 3만원이요? 며칠 걸려요? (sammanwon-iyo? myeochil geollyeoyo?)
직원 (jigwon): 5일 정도 걸립니다. (o-il jeongdo geollimnida.)
정수 (Jeongsu): 네. 감사합니다. (ne. gamsahamnida.)
Miseon: 영어로 한번더. (yeongeoro hanbeondeo.)
Keith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
직원 (jigwon): 어디에 보낼 거예요? (eodi-e bonael geo-yeyo?)
Keith: Where are you going to send it to?
정수 (Jeongsu): 미국이요. (miguk-iyo.)
Keith: America.
직원 (jigwon): 안에 뭐예요? (an-e mwo-yeyo?)
Keith: What is inside?
정수 (Jeongsu): 안에요? 책이요. 얼마예요? (an-eyo? chaek-iyo. eolma-yeyo?)
Keith: Inside? Books. How much will it cost?
직원 (jigwon): 3만원이에요. (sammanwon-ieyo.)
Keith: Thirty thousand won.
정수 (Jeongsu): 3만원이요? 며칠 걸려요? (sammanwon-iyo? myeochil geollyeoyo?)
Keith: Thirty thousand won? How many days will it take?
직원 (jigwon): 5일 정도 걸립니다. (o-il jeongdo geollimnida.)
Keith: It will take about five days.
정수 (Jeongsu): 네. 감사합니다. (ne. gamsahamnida.)
Keith: Okay. Thank you.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Keith: Miseon-ssi, do you use the post office often?
Miseon: 아니요. (aniyo.)
Keith: Yeah, I think recently a lot of people, they just kind of, stopped going to post office. Everything is Email these days, you know?
Miseon: 네 (ne), 네 (ne).
Keith: But actually what I did do in Korea was … You know I lived there for about a year. I had to send all my stuff back to my mum’s house in America, and I’d to pack it up in a box, so I packed it up really nice and then I sent it over, I did it by boat. Boat is the cheapest way to do it of course, right? And then you know, may be like two months later I was at my mum’s house in America and I got my package back. It was all beat up, it was like it was tossed around, so may be the boat is not the best option, if you have valuable stuff. But of course I’m very poor, so nothing is very valuable, so it was ok.
Miseon: You’re so poor. I’m sorry.
Keith: So, if you ever in Korea, if you’re living there for a while, you have send some stuff back and forth from where you’re from, the cheapest way to do it is of course by boat. But if you have valuable things, try to take it in the plane with your or I would suggest the plane.
Miseon: Yeah, that’s true, that’s true. You know, speaking of this, one thing I remember is that; it’s kind of like funny, two months ago I used a post office for my friend’s birthday gift.
Keith: Okay.
Miseon: Actually I bought in a Dunkin Donuts coffee because my friend’s really loved it, and then just asking me like, I really want to have Dunkin Donuts, so I bought like 10 packs. And, then you know, I just send it. And it was kind of like, 너무 비싸서요. (neomu bissaseoyo.)
Keith: Yeah, Actually I does get kind of pricy.
Miseon: Yeah, yeah. I think it costed more than I bought Dunkin Donuts.
Keith: For the coffee.
Miseon: Yeah, I was like, Okay.
Keith: Yeah, I remember when I was sending my stuff, actually I had a lot of stuff, I’d really big boxes, and it cost up to around 삼십 만원 (samsip manwon), around 300,000₩.
Miseon: Right, that’s expensive, yeah.
Keith: So, it does get kind of pricy, but … Also another tip that I want to give to listeners is if you don’t have boxes just go to the post office. You can buy boxes there too.
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: All right, so let’s take a look at the vocabulary of this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne).
VOCAB LIST
Miseon: 어디 (eodi) [natural native speed]
Keith: where
Miseon: 어디 (eodi) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 어디 (eodi) [natural native speed]
Keith: What’s after that?
Miseon: 보내다 (bonaeda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to send
Miseon: 보내다 (bonaeda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 보내다 (bonaeda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 미국 (miguk) [natural native speed]
Keith: the U.S.A., America
Miseon: 미국 (miguk) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 미국 (miguk) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 안 (an) [natural native speed]
Keith: inside
Miseon: 안 (an) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 안 (an) [natural native speed]
Keith: After that.
Miseon: 책 (chaek) [natural native speed]
Keith: book
Miseon: 책 (chaek) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 책 (chaek) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 얼마 (eolma) [natural native speed]
Keith: how long, how much, how many
Miseon: 얼마 (eolma) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 얼마 (eolma) [natural native speed]
Keith: What’s after that?
Miseon: 걸리다 (geollida) [natural native speed]
Keith: to take (time)
Miseon: 걸리다 (geollida) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 걸리다 (geollida) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 정도 (jeongdo) [natural native speed]
Keith: about, approximately
Miseon: 정도 (jeongdo) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 정도 (jeongdo) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 며칠 (myeochil) [natural native speed]
Keith: a few days, what date, how many days
Miseon: 며칠 (myeochil) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 며칠 (myeochil) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right, so let’s take a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne). The first word we’ll look at is 보내다. (bonaeda.)
Keith: To send.
Miseon: 보내다 (bonaeda), 보내다. (bonaeda.)
Keith: And this word 보내다 (bonaeda) has two meanings, one of them is to send.
Miseon: Another meaning is to spend time.
Keith: Ok, but here it means to send as in sending a letter, we are at a post office, there. We’re going to send a letter, a postcard, or even an Email.
Miseon: 네 (ne). You can also send a 문자 메세지. (munja meseji.)
Keith: Right, that’s a text message on the phone.
Miseon: 문자 메세지를 보내다. (munja mesejireul bonaeda.)
Keith: To send a text message, to send a SMS.
Miseon: And the next word we are looking at is 정도 (jeongdo).
Keith: About, approximately.
Miseon: 정도 (jeongdo). 정도 (jeongdo).
Keith: All right, how do you use this word?
Miseon: In English when you say about or approximately, you can put it before a number, but in Korean we say 정도 (jeongdo) after a number or amount.
Keith: Right, so in Korean it comes after. For example:
Miseon: For example, 3일 정도 (il jeongdo).
Keith: “About three days”. But if you notice the word 정도 (jeongdo) came afterwards.
Miseon: 두 사람 정도. (du saram jeongdo.)
Keith: And again it comes afterwards, that one means “about two people”.
Okay, now it’s about time to a look at the focus for this lesson.
Miseon: Sure.

Lesson focus

Keith: All right, so what’ the focus for this lesson?
Miseon: 네 (ne). The focus of this lesson is to learn the basic expressions used in the post office.
Keith: When you go into a post office in Korea things are quite similar to other countries I assume.
Miseon: 네 (ne). But chances are you have to speak some Korean to make sure your letter or your parcel is being sent to the right place using the right service.
Keith: Right, so using Korean is the difference.
Well, let’s cover some basic phrases that you might need in a post office.
Miseon: Okay, let’s look at some of the most common questions that the customer and the staff might exchange in the post office.
Keith: Okay, so the first phrase the agent at the post office might ask you is this question.
Miseon: 어디에 보낼 거예요? (eodie bonael geoyeyo?)
Keith: Where’re you going to send it?
Miseon: 어디에 보낼 거예요? (eodie bonael geoyeyo?)
Keith: And what’s the question after that?
Miseon: 안에 뭐예요? (ane mwoyeyo?)
Keith: What’s inside?
Miseon: 안에 뭐예요? (ane mwoyeyo?)
Keith: And they ask you this not because they actually want to know, but because they have to write how much the content is worth.
Miseon: 네 (ne). And next you can ask them 얼마예요? (eolmayeyo?)
Keith: How much is it?
Miseon: 얼마예요? (eolmayeyo?)
Keith: And if you want to know how many days it’s going to take before your letter or parcel arrives.
Miseon: 며칠 걸려요? (myeochil geollyeoyo?)
Keith: How many days does it take?
Miseon: 며칠 걸려요? (myeochil geollyeoyo?) Or you can also ask 얼마나 걸려요? (eolmana geollyeoyo?)
Keith: How long does it take?
Miseon: 얼마나 걸려요? (eolmana geollyeoyo?)
Keith: Then you’re going to take an answer about how many days it’s going to take.
Miseon: 네 (ne). And if you’re sending something domestically in Korea, the agent at the post office might also ask you which type of service you’d like.
Keith: Yeah, there’s mainly three types of mail services in Korea.
Miseon: 일반 우편. (ilban upyeon.)
Keith: That’s regular mail.
Miseon: 일반 우편. (ilban upyeon.) Another one, 등기 우편. (deunggi upyeon.)
Keith: That’s registered mail.
Miseon: And the other, 빠른 우편. (ppareun upyeon.)
Keith: And that one’s express mail.
Miseon: 네 (ne). You can tell the agent which service you want and ask 얼마예요? (eolmayeyo?) for each to check the fees.
Keith: But if you’re just sending a letter or a postcard, you can just use 일반 우편. (ilban upyeon.)
Miseon: 일반 (ilban), regular mail regularly only takes few days these days.

Outro

Keith: Now don’t forget to stop buy koreanclass101.com and pick up the lesson notes.
Miseon: It has the conversation transcript.
Keith: Vocabs, sample sentences and grammar explanation.
Miseon: And a culture insights section.
Keith: Seeing the Korean.
Miseon: really helps you remember faster.
Keith: But don’t take our word for it. Please have a look for yourself.
Miseon: And let us know what you think.
Keith: All right, so that’s going to do it. Happy sending of letters, and parcels, and gifts and everything else. Bye bye.
Miseon: Write a letter write now. Okay? 안녕히 가세요. (annyeonghi gaseyo.)
Keith: Bye bye.
Miseon: Bye.

Grammar

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15 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Do you use a post office often? :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 02:03 AM
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Hi Gustavo,


Thanks for posting. 보내다 has two meanings, one is 'to send' (items), the other would be to 'spend' (time). It can be tricky, but if you remember it this way, it will be easier.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Gustavo
Wednesday at 03:03 AM
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Hey There,


I was checking the vocab section before listening the audio and I realized that in the vocab section it's written:

보내다 - To Spend

And in the Lesson Transcript:

보내다 - To Send


I believe it's just a typo error in the vocab section, cuz otherwise the dialogue wouldn't make much sense (I've seen only the first line of the dialogue so far, stopped at it cuz it got me tricked), but it got me confused, so just to make sure, 보내다 is the verb To Send, right?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 10:43 PM
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Hi Giorgio,


Thanks for posting--that is exactly how you use this phrase! 😄


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Giorgio
Thursday at 01:45 PM
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Lyn,


I learned later to take it to mean "I got it" or " Duly noted." so that I won't think he/she asked about something he/she already knew about, haha.


So, in short, my reaction to your response is...알았어요.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:25 AM
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Hi Giorgio,


Thanks for posting. Usually, when people answer 알았어요/알겠습니다 after they have been told something, it means 'I understand', rather than 'I know'. So it's not a rude phrase! 😄


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Giorgio
Thursday at 09:34 AM
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I noticed in Korean conversation, when someone is told of an information that he or she probably did not know about, this person responds with "Arasseoyo" and that made me think, "Come on, man. You really knew that? Yet you asked about it."


Seemed rude or presumptuous. How could you have known? Then it was pointed out that it's better to see arraeseoyo to mean "I got it" which is past tense also.

Koreanclass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:35 PM
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"Hi ,


안녕하세요. I'm Madison from KoreanClass101.com


Thank you for the comment.


Thank you for your question. We're here to help you.


알지만 and 알아요 both mean I understand and I know~. However, the difference would be 알지만 is when it's continuous. So when you want to say, I understand but~ instead of 'I understand.(period)'. 알아요 would be I understand(period).


If you have any further questions, please feel free to let us know.


Thank you,

감사합니다.


Madison / KoreanClass101.com"

채ㅣㅊ퍄ㅗㅁㅎ;ㅣㅇ
Sunday at 03:54 PM
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알지만 = I know, but _______

알아요 = I know.

Evie
Sunday at 03:51 PM
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Hello I am a newbie and would like to first say Thank you for your hard work. Secondly I was wondering what is the difference between 알지만 and 알아요. Thank you very much

Colin
Thursday at 06:59 AM
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Why do I get the impression that you are the same guy as the languagecast hyunwoo...