Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Miseon: 안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo), KoreanClass101.com입니다 (imnida).
Keith: Hey, And I am Keith, welcome to newbie series season 4, lesson 10; Showing Emphasis - “The New House in Korea is Really Nice!” Hello and welcome back to KoreanClass101.com, the fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Korean. I’m joined in the studio by...
Miseon: Hello everyone, Miseon입니여. (imniyeo.)
Keith: All right. Miseon-ssi what are we going to learn how to say in Korean, in this lesson?
Miseon: 네 (ne), in this lesson we’ll learn how to emphasis an adjective using the word [*] and also learn some expressions about moving.
Keith: And this conversation takes place:
Miseon: In a café.
Keith: The conversation is between:
Miseon: Yeongmi and Suyeong.
Keith: They’re friends, therefore:
Miseon: So, they’re speaking intimate language, 반말 이요. (banmal iyo.)
Keith: Now if you’re listening on an IPod.
Miseon: Or and ITouch or IPhone.
Keith: Click the centre button of the IPod, or tab the screen on an ITouch or IPhone to see the notes for this lesson while you listen.
Miseon: Read along while you listen.
Keith: This technique will help you remember faster. Okay, let’s listen to the conversation.
Miseon: 잘 들어보세요. (jal deureoboseyo.)
DIALOGUE
영미 (yeongmi): 나 이사했어. (na isahaesseo.)
수영 (suyeong): 정말? 집들이 할 거야? (jeongmal? jipdeuri hal geo-ya?)
영미 (yeongmi): 응! 집들이 할 거야. (eung! jipdeuri hal geo-ya.)
수영 (suyeong): 새 집 어때? 좋아? (sae jip eottae? joa?)
영미 (yeongmi): 응! 너무 좋아! 부엌도 너무 넓고, 방도 너무 예쁘고, 전망도 너무 좋아. (eung! neomu joa! bueok-do neomu neolgo, bang-do neomu yeppeugo, jeonmang-do neomu joa.)
수영 (suyeong): 우와... 얼마야? (uwa... eolma-ya?)
영미 (yeongmi): 어... 응... 너무 비싸… (eo... eung... neomu bissa…)
Miseon: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
영미 (yeongmi): 나 이사했어. (na isahaesseo.)
수영 (suyeong): 정말? 집들이 할 거야? (jeongmal? jipdeuri hal geo-ya?)
영미 (yeongmi): 응! 집들이 할 거야. (eung! jipdeuri hal geo-ya.)
수영 (suyeong): 새 집 어때? 좋아? (sae jip eottae? joa?)
영미 (yeongmi): 응! 너무 좋아! 부엌도 너무 넓고, 방도 너무 예쁘고, 전망도 너무 좋아. (eung! neomu joa! bueok-do neomu neolgo, bang-do neomu yeppeugo, jeonmang-do neomu joa.)
수영 (suyeong): 우와... 얼마야? (uwa... eolma-ya?)
영미 (yeongmi): 어... 응... 너무 비싸… (eo... eung... neomu bissa…)
Miseon: 영어로 한번더. (yeongeoro hanbeondeo.)
Keith: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
영미 (yeongmi): 나 이사했어. (na isahaesseo.)
Keith: I moved.
수영 (suyeong): 정말? 집들이 할 거야? (jeongmal? jipdeuri hal geo-ya?)
Keith: Really? Are you going to have a housewarming party?
영미 (yeongmi): 응! 집들이 할 거야. (eung! jipdeuri hal geo-ya.)
Keith: Yes! I'm going to have a housewarming party.
수영 (suyeong): 새 집 어때? 좋아? (sae jip eottae? joa?)
Keith: How's the new house? Is it good?
영미 (yeongmi): 응! 너무 좋아! 부엌도 너무 넓고, 방도 너무 예쁘고, 전망도 너무 좋아. (eung! neomu joa! bueok-do neomu neolgo, bang-do neomu yeppeugo, jeonmang-do neomu joa.)
Keith: Yes! It's really good! The kitchen is really big, the rooms are really pretty, and the view is really nice.
수영 (suyeong): 우와... 얼마야? (uwa... eolma-ya?)
Keith: Wow...how much did it cost?
영미 (yeongmi): 어... 응... 너무 비싸… (eo... eung... neomu bissa…)
Keith: Oh...well...it's too expensive.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Keith: All right, Miseon-ssi.
Miseon: 네 (ne).
Keith: What do you usually bring when you go to a housewarming party?
Miseon: Well, in Korea they usually bring like, candles, and detergents, and bathroom tissues and something like that. Yeah, that …
Keith: Well, the bathroom tissues and the detergents; I can understand. You are helping out with the house. But, why the candles?
Miseon: Candle … when you lit the candles actually, then it becomes bright. So, they’re actually a blessing, You know.
Keith: Kind of a blessing for the house.
Miseon: it’s kind of like, yeah, symbolize the blessing of that space.
Keith: Oh wow, Okay.
Miseon: Yeah.
Keith: Well, one thing that I know not to bring or not to give, is knives. Because I asked my mum for a knife when I was moving to college, and going to new apartment. So, mum, give me a knife, I need to cook or something, all right? She was like, no, and she was really like no, I’am not giving you a knife, and I was like, why, what happened. She said that in Korea this’s just not a gift that you give to someone. You don’t give anyone a knife because it symbolises you know, bad things like killing, death or all the negative stuff. So she said, buy your own knife.
Miseon: I mean, it does make sense but I never heard that in my whole life, actually.
Keith: Maybe it’s different from where my mum is from, may be, but she said it was a Korean thing. May be my mum is lying I don’t know. It’s a fair thing.
Miseon: You know one thing I remember [that] my friend’s best friend actually is a cook.
Keith: Okay.
Miseon: So you know, when she have a housewarming party actually. We as the people actual friends, you know, pay a little bit of money and then bought a knife for her.
Keith: Really. How did she react?
Miseon: She was so happy.
Keith: May be it’s like an old Korean thing to not give knives.
Miseon: Yeah, maybe.
Keith: Maybe.
Miseon: But nowadays it doesn’t matter, right?
Keith: Just give whatever you want.
Miseon: You know, right. And what they need.
Keith: Candles are always a nice gift to symbolize a happy home.
Miseon: Yeah, that’s true.
Keith: All right, so let’s have a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne).
VOCAB LIST
Keith: The first word we have is:
Miseon: 이사하다 (isahada) [natural native speed]
Keith: to move, to move to a new house
Miseon: 이사하다 (isahada) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 이사하다 (isahada) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 정말 (jeongmal) [natural native speed]
Keith: really, for real
Miseon: 정말 (jeongmal) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 정말 (jeongmal) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 집들이 (jipdeuri) [natural native speed]
Keith: housewarming party
Miseon: 집들이 (jipdeuri) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 집들이 (jipdeuri) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 새 (sae) [natural native speed]
Keith: new
Miseon: 새 (sae) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 새 (sae) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 집 (jip) [natural native speed]
Keith: house, home
Miseon: 집 (jip) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 집 (jip) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 부엌 (bueok) [natural native speed]
Keith: kitchen
Miseon: 부엌 (bueok) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 부엌 (bueok) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 넓다 (neolda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to be wide, to be spacious
Miseon: 넓다 (neolda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 넓다 (neolda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 방 (bang) [natural native speed]
Keith: room
Miseon: 방 (bang) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 방 (bang) [natural native speed]
Keith: After that.
Miseon: 예쁘다 (yeppeuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: to be pretty
Miseon: 예쁘다 (yeppeuda) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 예쁘다 (yeppeuda) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 전망 (jeonmang) [natural native speed]
Keith: view, landscape
Miseon: 전망 (jeonmang) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 전망 (jeonmang) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 비싸다 (bissada) [natural native speed]
Keith: to be expensive
Miseon: 비싸다 (bissada) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 비싸다 (bissada) [natural native speed]
Keith: Next.
Miseon: 너무 (neomu) [natural native speed]
Keith: very, very much so
Miseon: 너무 (neomu) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Miseon: 너무 (neomu) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right, so let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne). The first word we look at is 이사하다 (isahada).
Keith: To move, to move into a new house.
Miseon: 이사하다 (isahada), 이사하다 (isahada).
Keith: Okay, now 이사하다 (isahada) is the general word for moving. But in Korean, there are two more ways to describe whether you are moving out or you’re moving in.
Miseon: 네 (ne). So, if you’re moving out from this house and going away to different place, you use the verb to go “to go”, 가다 (gada), and say 이사 가다. (isa gada.)
Keith: And what’s the opposite if you’re moving in?
Miseon: If you’re moving into a house from somewhere else, you use “to come” 오다 (oda), and say 이사 오다. (isa oda.)
Keith: So that’s 이사 가다 (isa gada) and 이사 오다. (isa oda.) And the general verb to move is:
Miseon: 이사하다. (isahada.)
Keith: Right, so we’re just changing 하다 (hada) at the end to 가다 (gada) or 오다 (oda).
Miseon: 네 (ne), 맞아요 (majayo). And you know one interesting thing about this verb, is the first two letters 이사 (isa), they sound like numbers. Right?
Keith: Right, 이 (i) and 사 (sa).
Miseon: 네 (ne). Did everybody guess what number that is?
Keith: Oh, I did, I did. I know what they are.
Miseon: Oh, not you, not you.
Keith: I’m going to say it anyway. Two and four.
Miseon: 네 (ne), 맞아요 (majayo). 이사 (isa).
Keith: 이사 (isa), two four.
Miseon: So, a lot of moving agencies have this number repeated in their phone number. Like, 555-이사이사 (isaisa).
Keith: That’s 555-2424 이사이사 (isaisa), and I also see 2482 , 이사팔이 (isapari), 2482 이사 빨리 (isa ppalli). 빨리 (ppalli) “eight two”, “moving quickly”.
Miseon: That’s funny. Right? but one’s pretty common too, right?
Keith: Yeah, so, now it’s almost weird if a moving agency doesn’t have 이사 (isa) “two four” in their phone number.
Miseon: 네 (ne), I think so too.
Keith: Okay, so what’s the next word we are taking a look at?
Miseon: 집들이 (jipdeuri)
Keith: Housewarming party.
Miseon: 집들이, 집들이. (jipdeuri, jipdeuri.)
Keith: All right, so a housewarming party is 집들이 (jipdeuri) and it comes from two words, correct?
Miseon: 네 (ne). 집 (jip) and 들다 (deulda) or 들어가다 (deureogada)
Keith: All right, that’s house and enter.
Miseon: 집들이. (jipdeuri.)
Keith: And when you give or when you throw a housewarming party, what’s the verb that we use?
Miseon: 하다 (hada). 집들이하다. (jipdeurihada.)
Keith: To give a housewarming party or to throw a housewarming party. All right, great job, so now let’s take a look at focus for this lesson.
Miseon: 네 (ne).

Lesson focus

Keith: Miseon-ssi, What’s the focus of this lesson?
Miseon: The focus of this lesson is how to emphasis and adjective using the word 너무 (neomu), and also learn some expressions about moving.
Keith: As in the example:
Miseon: 새 집 너무 좋아! (sae jip neomu joa!)
Keith: The new house is really good.
Miseon: 네 (ne). When you want to say something is very good, very expensive, very tasty and etc. etc. you can use the expression 너무 (neomu).
Keith: All right, well the word 너무 (neomu) literally means “too”, or “excessively”. But actually in modern Korean, 너무 (neomu) is very commonly used to mean very, or really.
Miseon: 네 (ne), there are other Korean words that you can find in the dictionary translations for very, but 너무 (neomu) is the word that’s most commonly used.
Keith: And let me take a guest that’s especially by young women, isn’t that right?
Miseon: 네 (ne), and you can determine whether 너무 (neomu) means “very” or “excessively” through the context.
Keith: Okay, so how do you use that in a sentence?
Miseon: Just put the word 너무 (neomu) in front of the adjective or adverb, that you want to emphasize.
Keith: That’s it?
Miseon: 네 (ne). That’s it. So for example, 좋아요 (joayo) is "It's good.", so if you want to say "it's really good" you can say 너무 좋아요. (neomu joayo.)
Keith: How about if you want to say something is too expensive?
Miseon: It’s the same, just adding 너무 (neomu) in front of 비싸요 (bissayo). So 너무 비싸요 (neomu bissayo).
Keith: Great, can you give us some more sample sentences?
Miseon: 여기 너무 좋아요! (yeogi neomu joayo!)
Keith: "I really like this place."
Miseon: 오늘 너무 더워요. (oneul neomu deowoyo.)
Keith: "It's too hot today."
Miseon: 너무 맛있어요. (neomu masisseoyo.)
Keith: "It's really delicious." Okay, so how was it used in the dialogue for this lesson?
Miseon: 너무 좋아! (neomu joa!)
Keith: "It's really good!"
Miseon: 부엌도 너무 넓고, 방도 너무 예쁘고, 전망도 너무 좋아. (bueokdo neomu neolgo, bangdo neomu yeppeugo, jeonmangdo neomu joa.)
Keith: "The kitchen's really big, the room is really pretty and the view is really nice. too."
Miseon: 너무 비싸… (neomu bissa…)
Keith: "It's too expensive."

Outro

Miseon: Okay, before we go, we got an Email asking; what is the sample feed?
Keith: Well, the short answer is: 10 free lessons with all the accompanying materials.
Miseon: The pdfs, conversation only tracks, review tracks, right?
Keith: Yup, everything. It’s a sample of our premium feed. A powerful web 2.0 technology, which allows you to get all of our content through ITunes, with just a click of a button.
Miseon: To test out the sample feed.
Keith: Visit koreanclass101.com, and on the lessons page, there is a “Subscribe to new basic or premium feeds today” graphic. Click on that, scroll down.
Miseon: And click sample feed, allow ITunes to open. And that’s all. 10 free lessons to ITunes, is that easy.
Keith: All right, well, that’s just about does it for this lesson. Thanks for listening. Bye bye.
Miseon: 네 (ne), 감 사 합니다 여러분. (gam sa hamnida yeoreobun.) 안녕히 계세요. (annyeonghi gyeseyo.)

Grammar

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21 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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What are some things to do when you're really bored and alone? :)

Goryo
Sunday at 11:40 PM
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7/26/20


Troublesome quartet 더-도-또-다시.


Why are they troublesome to me, and maybe for you too, fellow students, and perhaps even native speakers?


더 Deo means "more." In the exercises, they always say, "Hanbeon deo. One more time." Makes me think of "again."


도 Do means "also" but because of context, it can mean "again" as shown in the "It is raining again today/Oneuldo biga naeryeoyo" example.


Then there's good ole 또 Tto meaning "again." For one, the pronunciation. How do I make the listener know I am gunning for double T sound, take a deep breathe and hit them teeth with forceful air? What if I end up spraying, not saying?


Then for good measure, there's 다시 Dashi, which also means "again."


So, basically, when do I use what, since they all seem to signify repetition?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 04:18 AM
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Hi Pauline,


Thank you for commenting.

~고 is a suffix which means "and then", and usually connects two clauses.

Examples:


이쁘고 착하네.

넓고 깨끗하고 싸고 좋다.


Hope this was of help!

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Pauline
Friday at 02:57 AM
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hello


can you pls explain why the ending of adjectives are changed to 고 eg. 넓고, 예쁘고


thanks


pauline

KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 09:27 AM
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Hi 링,


Thanks for posting. ~도 means 'also/and'.

So this sentence would mean: "Yes, I really like it! The kitchen is also spacious, the room is also pretty, and the view is also great".


Hope this was of help!

Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com


Wednesday at 08:45 PM
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Why did she put 도 3 times in this sentence

"응! 너무 좋아! 부엌도 너무 넓고, 방도 너무 예쁘고, 전망도 너무 좋아."

Also what does it mean here then?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 08:26 PM
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Hi Ian, Colin,


Thanks for commenting. Men use '너무' in conversation, it is not considered a feminine phrase. :smile:

And yes, the I.O.I. song was pretty catchy and popular. :smile:


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Colin
Friday at 11:18 PM
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Ian - Im not sure if it's considered effeminate. Nothing wrong with a guy saying 너무 or 되게

Ian
Friday at 11:13 PM
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Can men say 너무 too? Is there a male version of the word for very? I love the I.O.I song by the way. :smile:

Koreanclass101.com Verified
Monday at 12:56 PM
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Hey Koreanclassers!:)



Jg - that would be an amazing way to spend for the weekend!:D


Colin - definite thanks to you! We have reported an error and should be fixed soon ;)


Sammy - yes! But maybe adding 서, such as 부엌에서 요리해요! ;)




Thank you


Madison

Team Koreanclass101.com

Sammy-Joe
Thursday at 11:38 PM
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Hi


I've got a question about one of the sample sentences.


부엌에서 요리를 하고 있어요. I am cooking in the kitchen.


If I were to say: 저는 부엌에 요리 해요.

Would that mean the same?


Sammy