Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Minkyong: 안녕하세요. (Annyeonghaseyo.) KoreanClass101.com의 지민경입니다 (ui jimingyeongimnida).
Keith: Hey and I am Keith. Learn How to Get More of What You Want in Korea. So Minkyong, what are we taking a look at in this lesson? And it’s a good one today, isn’t it?
Minkyong: Yeah. In this lesson, you will learn how to say “more” in Korean, 더 (deo).
Keith: And this conversation takes place at home. Who is the conversation between?
Minkyong: The conversation is between two sisters.
Keith: And because they are sisters, of course
Minkyong: They will be speaking in 반말 (banmal).
Keith: Informal Korean.
Keith: Okay. How about we take a listen to the conversation?
Minkyong: 네, 들어 봅시다. (ne, deureo bopsida.)
DIALOGUE
미아 (mia): 아... 머리 아파. (meori apa.)
지훈 (jihun): 진짜? 이 약 먹어. (jinjja? i yak meogeo.)
미아 (mia): 고마워. ( gomawo.)
지훈 (jihun): 어때? (eottae?)
미아 (mia): 아... 더 아파. (a... deo apa.)
지훈 (jihun): 더? 음... 약 더 먹어. (deo? eum... yak deo meogeo.)
미아 (mia): 아... 더 아파... 이 약 뭐야? (a... deo apa... i yak mwo-ya?)
지훈 (jihun): 소화제. (sohwaje.)
Seol: 한번 더 천천히 (hanbeon deo cheoncheonhi).
Keith: One more time, slowly.
미아 (mia): 아... 머리 아파. (meori apa.)
지훈 (jihun): 진짜? 이 약 먹어. (jinjja? i yak meogeo.)
미아 (mia): 고마워. ( gomawo.)
지훈 (jihun): 어때? (eottae?)
미아 (mia): 아... 더 아파. (a... deo apa.)
지훈 (jihun): 더? 음... 약 더 먹어. (deo? eum... yak deo meogeo.)
미아 (mia): 아... 더 아파... 이 약 뭐야? (a... deo apa... i yak mwo-ya?)
지훈 (jihun): 소화제. (sohwaje.)
Seol: 영어로 한 번 더 (yeongeoro han beon deo).
Keith: One more time, with the English.
미아 (mia): 아... 머리 아파. (meori apa.)
Keith: I have a headache.
지훈 (jihun): 진짜? 이 약 먹어. (jinjja? i yak meogeo.)
Keith: Really? Take this medicine.
미아 (mia): 고마워. ( gomawo.)
Keith: Thanks.
지훈 (jihun): 어때? (eottae?)
Keith: How are you feeling?
미아 (mia): 아... 더 아파. (a... deo apa.)
Keith: Oh...it's getting worse.
지훈 (jihun): 더? 음... 약 더 먹어. (deo? eum... yak deo meogeo.)
Keith: Worse? Hmm...take more medicine.
미아 (mia): 아... 더 아파... 이 약 뭐야? (a... deo apa... i yak mwo-ya?)
Keith: Oh...I feel worse...what's this medicine?
지훈 (jihun): 소화제. (sohwaje.)
Keith: Digestive…
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Minkyong: You should really check what you are taking before you actually take any medicine.
Keith: Well, I don’t think any indigestion medicine would be so much harm.
Minkyong: But you never know. Taking indigestion for any headache can’t be so good. You might be left with a headache and a stomachache.
Keith: Okay well instead of indigestion medicine, what’s a traditional Korean solution for headaches or stomachaches?
Minkyong: The most popular one is called 게보린 (geborin).
Keith: 게보린 (geborin). And is that a brand name for medicine?
Minkyong: Yeah it’s a brand name like Tylenol and Advil.
Keith: Okay, so 게보린 (geborin) is the Tylenol of Korea.
Minkyong: That’s right.
Keith: And they have everything from headaches to stomachaches to leg aches, eye aches, no?
Minkyong: Yeah probably. I think you can take it for everything.
Keith: Well, but if some of our listeners are in Korea and they are sick, they are hurt, oh my head hurts, what can they say to the pharmacist, hey I want some Tylenol. If they said Tylenol, would the pharmacist understand?
Minkyong: Yes. Tylenol is pretty common in Korea too. So if you want a Tylenol, you could just ask for 타이레놀 주세요 (tairenol juseyo).
Keith: Or if you want some – I don’t know if it’s traditional Korean medicine but Korean style modern medicine.
Minkyong: Yes.
Keith: You can ask for
Minkyong: 게보린 주세요. (geborin juseyo.)
Keith: Okay. How about we take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson?
VOCAB LIST
Keith: The first word we are going to take a look at is
Minkyong: 머리 (meori) [natural native speed]
Keith: head
Minkyong: 머리 (meori) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 머리 (meori) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 아파 (apa) [natural native speed]
Keith: It hurts. I'm sick. (intimate)
Minkyong: 아파 (apa) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 아파 (apa) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 진짜 (jinjja) [natural native speed]
Keith: really
Minkyong: 진짜 (jinjja) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 진짜 (jinjja) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 먹어 (meogeo) [natural native speed]
Keith: I eat. Eat. (intimate)
Minkyong: 먹어 (meogeo) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 먹어 (meogeo) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 고마워 (gomawo). [natural native speed]
Keith: Thanks. (intimate)
Minkyong: 고마워 (gomawo). [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 고마워 (gomawo). [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 어때? (eottae) [natural native speed]
Keith: How is it? / How about...? (intimate)
Minkyong: 어때? (eottae) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 어때? (eottae) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 소화제 (sohwaje) [natural native speed]
Keith: digestive medicine
Minkyong: 소화제 (sohwaje) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 소화제 (sohwaje) [natural native speed]
: Next:
Minkyong: 약 (yak) [natural native speed]
Keith: medicine, drug
Minkyong: 약 (yak) [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Minkyong: 약 (yak) [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right. So let’s really dig deep into these words and find out how to use some of these words in context. So what’s the first word we are going to take a look at?
Minkyong: 머리 (meori).
Keith: Head and how do we say I have a headache, my head hurts.
Minkyong: In Korean, we say, literally, my head hurts. So we say 머리 아파 (meori apa).
Keith: Okay and what’s that last word?
Minkyong: 아파 (apa).
Keith: Hurt and how do we say that more politely?
Minkyong: 아파요 (apayo).
Keith: Right. We just add on that 요 at the end. Okay so how do you say you are very sick? I am very, very sick.
Minkyong: 많이 아파요 (mani apayo).
Keith: Okay and what’s that first word?
Minkyong: 많이 (mani).
Keith: And that’s literally “a lot” or “many”; and after that, once again we have
Minkyong: 아파요 (apayo).
Keith: Hurt, a lot hurt and that’s to say, I am very sick. How about when you are hurting, when I am hurt, not sick.
Minkyong: It’s the same, 아파요 (apayo).
Keith: Right. So we can use 아파요 (apayo) for both hurting and sick. Let’s say I bump my leg into my sofa which happens pretty often to me actually, my toe. My toe gets stumped. So instead of oh, my foot is hurt, how would I say it’s hurt?
Minkyong: 아파요 (apayo).
Keith: Okay, and how about if I am actually sick like I am throwing up ahh…
Minkyong: 아파요 (apayo).
Keith: Right. We use both of them for the same thing. Okay so what’s our next word?
Minkyong: 약 (yak).
Keith: Medicine or drug. And what kind of 약 (yak) came out in this dialogue, what kind of medicine?
Minkyong: 소화제 (sohwaje).
Keith: And that’s digestive medicine. Okay, how do we say, take some medicine?
Minkyong: 약 먹어 (yak meogeo) or 약 먹어요 (yak meogeoyo).
Keith: So if you want to say, take some digestion medicine, what can we say?
Minkyong: 소화제 먹어. (sohwaje meogeo.)
Keith: Right. So instead of saying, take medicine, we are saying, eat medicine in Korean and what’s that word to eat again?
Minkyong: 먹어 (meogeo).
Keith: Right. So when we say take medicine, we are saying “eat medicine.”
Minkyong: 약 먹어 (yak meogeo).
Keith: And to be polite, just once again add on that 요 at the end.
Minkyong: 약 먹어요 (yak meogeoyo).
Keith: Okay, how about we take a look at the focus for this lesson?
Minkyong: 네, 넘어가요 (ne, neomeogayo).

Lesson focus

Minkyong: the focus of this lesson is how to say "more", 더 (deo)
Keith: And 더 (deo) is used in the same way as the English word "more" in a sentence. It can be used as a noun, an adjective, or an adverb, and it comes before the word that it modifies. for example, how do we say “it’s expensive”?
Minkyong: 비싸요 (bissayo).
Keith: So how do we say “it’s more expensive”?
Minkyong: 더 비싸요. (deo bissayo)
Keith: Right. So here, the word order is the same as it is in Korean, “more” and then “expensive.” Okay, can we have another sample sentence?
Minkyong: 더 먹어 (deo meogeo).
Keith: That’s literally “more eat.” There, it’s not the same, hah! The word order.
Minkyong: Oh! 진짜네요 (jinjjaneyo).
Keith: Right, but in English, it comes afterwards, eat more but in Korean, it always comes before the adjective or the verb. So pretty easy to remember. All you’ve got to do is put it in front of what you are modifying and then there you go. So how about another sample sentence? How do you say, “do you have more of this?”
Minkyong: 이거 더 있어? (igeo deo isseo?)
Keith: And how did it come out in this dialogue?
Minkyong: 더 아파 (deo apa).
Keith: It hurts more but once again that more 더 (deo) is coming before
Minkyong: 아파 (apa).
Keith: So it hurts more
Minkyong: 더 아파 (deo apa).
Keith: How did it come out in this dialogue?
Minkyong: 더? 음… 약 더 먹어. (deo? eum... yak deo meogeo.)
Keith: “More? hmm.. take more medicine.” And once again, that’s literally “eat more medicine.” In Korean, we say eat medicine instead of take medicine. Okay, before we wrap up, can you give us some more examples?
Minkyong: 더 예뻐요. (deo yeppeoyo.)
Keith: “It’s prettier,” but literally, “it’s more pretty.”
Minkyong: Or, KoreanClass101 더 듣고 싶어요 (deo deutgo sipeoyo).
Keith: I want to listen to KoreanClass101.com more! And ain’t that a fact?

Outro

Keith: Okay! so that just about does it for this lesson. Thanks for listening.
Minkyong: 안녕히 계세요. (annyeonghi gyeseyo.)
Keith: Bye-bye.

Grammar

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34 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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In what situation would you use the word 더 (deo)? Can you give us some examples? :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:47 AM
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Hi rio,


Thank you for posting, glad to hear it!


Cheres,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

rio
Saturday at 11:14 PM
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Lyn씨,


도와줘서 감사합니다. 이제 이해가요!


😇❤️️

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:35 PM
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Hello Rio,


Thank you for posting. Yes, ~야 하나요? it is an inquisitive conjugation, literally translated as 'have to do ~verb?'.

Example:


먹어야 하나요? (Do I) have to eat this?

가야 하나요? (Do I) have to go?


Hope this was of help.

Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Rio
Sunday at 02:42 AM
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안녕하세요 K101팀. 질문 있어요.


I noticed in the sentence examples under the word 약 the following sentence --> 이 약을 매일 먹어야 하나요?


As a beginner, it's the first time I have seen this conjugation form of 하다. May I ask, is 하나요 only used as an inquisitive present conjugation?


도와줘서 감사합니다 😇❤️️

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 02:21 PM
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Hi Gregoire,


Thanks for posting. Could you let us know which sentence you used so we can provide you with an accurate answer?


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Gregoire
Sunday at 11:33 AM
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Batchim rules can make a novice batty but still great to know. These Filipino ears picked up the unmistakable NG sound, haha. Trivia: Filipino dialects also use the NG sound as the start of a syllable (Ngano "why?"; Ngunit "but").


I used "keunyeo"in a sentence with my Korean coworker and she gave me feedback that although I correctly used the word, it can be mistaken for something else, though my pronunciation was correct.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 05:27 PM
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Hi Gregoire,


Thanks for posting.

The sentence is:


(나는) 그녀가 보고 싶어. So 'she' here is the subject of the sentence.

But yes, you can also write it as 그녀를 보고 싶어. But you'll notice that native Koreans usually use the former sentence more than the latter.

As to your second question, if they were directly attached like this, 약먹어 would have been romanized as yangmeogeo due to batchim rules (if followed by a nasal consonant it would end up as an 'ng' sound). However there is spacing (약 먹어)so the romanization is yak meogeo, but when spoken very quickly you WILL hear people saying it with an 'ng' sound.


Hope this was of help.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Gregoire
Tuesday at 11:53 AM
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The last time I listened to the conversation, I noticed that 약 먹어 sounded like "yang meogeo" instead of "yak meogeo." Is there a pronunciation rule with "k" sounding like "ng"? Thanks.

Gregoire
Tuesday at 06:00 AM
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"This is a conversation between two sisters..."


After listening to the conversation the sixth time, it dawned on me that the other sister is a dude. Hehee.

Gregoire
Tuesday at 05:39 AM
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6/8/20


그녀가 더 보고 싶어.


Geunyeo-ga deo bogo sipeo.


"I miss her more."


^^^^Seems to me "her" is a direct object and should have "reul" after "geunyeo." I miss...who? Her. I miss her.


그녀를 더 보고 싶어.


Geunyeo-reul deo bogo sipeo.


"I miss her more."