Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Eric: Should We Visit this Korean Tourist Attraction? Eric here.
Suhyun: 안녕하세요. (Annyeonghaseyo.) I'm Suhyun.
Eric: In this lesson, you’ll learn about Korean counters.This conversation takes place on the bus.
Suhyun: It's between Sujin and Minho.
Eric: The speakers are acquaintances, so they’ll be using honorific Korean. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

수진: 민호 씨, 종묘 보러 같이 갈까요?
민호: 종묘요? 몇 시부터 열어요?
수진: 9시부터 6시까지 열어요.
민호: 어떻게 가야 돼요?
수진: 종로3가에서 만날까요? 거기서 금방 가요. 아, 참! 입장료는 1,000원이에요.
민호: 그러면 입장료는 제가 낼게요. 수진 씨는 밥을 사주세요.
수진: 네, 좋아요. 그럼 내일 만나요!
Eric: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
수진: 민호 씨, 종묘 보러 같이 갈까요?
민호: 종묘요? 몇 시부터 열어요?
수진: 9시부터 6시까지 열어요.
민호: 어떻게 가야 돼요?
수진: 종로3가에서 만날까요? 거기서 금방 가요. 아, 참! 입장료는 1,000원이에요.
민호: 그러면 입장료는 제가 낼게요. 수진 씨는 밥을 사주세요.
수진: 네, 좋아요. 그럼 내일 만나요!
Eric: Now, listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Sujin: Minho, would you like to see Jongmyo shrine together?
Minho: Jongmyo? What time does it open?
Sujin: It's open from 9 until 6.
Minho: How can we get there?
Sujin: Shall we meet at Jongro sam ga? From there, we can go there in no time. The entrance fee is 1000 won, by the way.
Minho: Then I'll pay the entrance fee. You pay for our meals.
Sujin: Okay. Then, I'll see you tomorrow!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Eric: Suhyun, I've heard that Jongmyo Palace is a great place for tourists to check out.
Suhyun: That’s right. In Korean, we call it 종묘. If you’re interested in Korean history and culture, especially Korean architecture, you’ll almost certainly love Jongmyo.
Eric: It was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1995, right?
Suhyun: That’s right. It has also been recognized by the Korean government as a national treasure, or in Korean 국보.
Eric: Jongmyo houses 83 spirit tablets of the ancient kings and queens, enshrined either in the Main Hall or the Hall of Eternal Peace. It’s certainly worth a visit! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Eric: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Suhyun: 종묘 [natural native speed]
Eric: Jongmyo
Suhyun: 종묘 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 종묘 [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Suhyun: 보다 [natural native speed]
Eric: to see, to look at, to watch
Suhyun: 보다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 보다 [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Suhyun: 종로3가 [natural native speed]
Eric: Jongro sam-ga
Suhyun: 종로3가 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 종로3가 [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Suhyun: 입장 [natural native speed]
Eric: entrance, admission
Suhyun: 입장 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 입장 [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Suhyun: 입장료 [natural native speed]
Eric: entrance fee
Suhyun: 입장료 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 입장료 [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Suhyun: 밥을 사주다 [natural native speed]
Eric: to buy a meal (for someone)
Suhyun: 밥을 사주다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 밥을 사주다 [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Suhyun: 금방 [natural native speed]
Eric: soon, shortly
Suhyun: 금방 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 금방 [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Suhyun: 만나다 [natural native speed]
Eric: to meet
Suhyun: 만나다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 만나다 [natural native speed]
Eric: Next we have..
Suhyun: 아참 [natural native speed]
Eric: oh that's right, by the way
Suhyun: 아참 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 아참 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Eric: Let's take a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Suhyun: 밥을 사주다
Eric: which means “to buy a meal for someone.”
Suhyun: 밥을 사주다 contains the noun 밥, which can mean “rice”, or more generally “food”, and the verb 사주다 which means “to buy something for someone”. Here the verb 사다 (sada) by itself means simply “to buy”, but when the verb 주다 (juda) is attached, the meaning changes slightly to imply the action is performed for another individual’s benefit, as in 사주다 “to buy something for the other.”
Eric: You can use this word when you want to treat someone to dinner, for example. In Korea, it’s common for the oldest person in a group to treat their juniors, so you’ll hear this expression quite often.
Suhyun: You can also use 밥을 사주다 to request that someone buy a meal for you.
Eric: For example you can say…
Suhyun: 밥을 사주세요!
Eric: “Please buy me a meal.” Suhyun, can you give us another example using this word?
Suhyun: Sure. For example, you can say.. 어제도 밥을 사줬잖아요!
Eric: ..which means “I bought your meal yesterday too!” Okay, what's the next word?
Suhyun: 금방
Eric: which means “soon” or “shortly”. This word can be used only in regards to events that are going to happen on the same day. If you’re talking about events that are going to happen in the near future, but not on the same day, you need to use the adverb...
Suhyun: 조만간
Eric: Suhyun, could you give us some sample sentences?
Suhyun: Sure. 걱정하지 마요. 금방 갈게요
Eric: “Don't worry. I'll go soon.”
Suhyun: 감기가 금방 나을 거예요.
Eric: “I'll get over my cold soon.” Okay, what's the next word?
Suhyun: 아, 참!
Eric: which means “oh that's right!”. You won’t find this word in a dictionary because it’s a very colloquial saying. So you should only use it in informal situations.
Suhyun: Right. For example, when an individual thinks of something they had meant to say, or when a thought occurs that wasn't originally present.
Eric: Can you give us an example using this word?
Suhyun: Sure. For example, you can say.. 아, 참! 혹 시 어제 축구경기를 보셨어요?
Eric: .. which means “Ah that's right! Did you see yesterday’s soccer match?” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Eric: In this lesson we’ll learn about Korean counters. There aren’t many words in English that are used as “counters”, but in Korean counter words are often used to describe more accurately what you are counting. Remember though, that with counters, you should always use the native Korean numbers.
Suhyun: That’s right.
Eric: Before we talk more about counters, let’s review the native Korean numbers from one to ten. Suhyun will give you the Korean, then I will give you the English.
Suhyun: First, 하나
Eric: one
Suhyun: 둘
Eric: two
Suhyun: 셋
Eric: three
Suhyun: 넷
Eric: four
Suhyun: 다섯
Eric: five
Suhyun: 여섯
Eric: six
Suhyun: 일곱
Eric: seven
Suhyun: 여덟
Eric: eight
Suhyun: 아홉
Eric: nine
Suhyun: 열
Eric: “ten.” By the way, don’t forget that the numbers 1 to 4 change their forms when they are followed by a counter.
Suhyun: Right. 하나, meaning “one” will become 한.
Eric: “two”...
Suhyun: 둘
Eric: will become
Suhyun: 두.
Eric: “three”
Suhyun: 셋
Eric: will become
Suhyun: 세
Eric: and “four”
Suhyun: 넷
Eric: will become
Suhyun: 네
Eric: When counting anything in Korean, you need to use pure Korean numbers, plus a counter word. Depending on the situation, you’ll have to use a different counter. For example, for counting people you should use the counter word…
Suhyun: 명
Eric: Following our pattern, “two students” in Korean is?
Suhyun: 학생 두 명. 학생 means “students”, 두 means “two” and 명 is a counter number for people.
Eric: So, breaking this down a bit, “two” in Korean is..
Suhyun: 둘
Eric: But when it’s used with a counter, it changes its form to...
Suhyun: 두. So it becomes 학생 두 명. not 학생 둘 명.
Eric: But Suhyun, what should you do if you don't know the proper counter to use?
Suhyun: If you’re talking about inanimate objects, you can use the counter word 개 (gae)
Eric: This is a general counter, which we can loosely translate as “piece” or “unit.” You can use it to count anything inanimate. For example, “one item” would be…
Suhyun: 한 개
Eric: and “two items” is..
Suhyun: 두 개
Eric: And what about “five items”?
Suhyun: That would be 다섯 개
Eric: We have a list of common counters in the lesson notes, so be sure check them out for more information.
Suhyun: We also have a video series named “Korean Counters” where you can learn more about counters in Korean.

Outro

Eric: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Suhyun: 안녕히 계세요. (Annyeonghi gyeseyo.)

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