Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome back to KoreanClass101.com. This is Lower Beginner Season 1 Lesson 14 - Ordering Food at a Korean Restaurant. Michael here.
Suhyun: 안녕하세요. I'm Suhyun.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn several honorific Korean expressions that you can use when you’re ordering food in a Korean restaurant.
Suhyun: The conversation is between Sujin and a waiter.
Michael: The speakers are not familiar with each other; so they’ll be using honorific Korean. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

수진: 저기요. 여기 불고기 이 인분 주세요.
웨이터: 네 알겠습니다.
수진: 그리고 소주 두 병 주세요.
웨이터: 소주는 어떤 것으로 드릴까요?
수진: 센 것으로 주세요.
웨이터: 네 알겠습니다.
수진: 카드로 계산해도 돼요?
웨이터: 네, 돼요.
Michael: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
수진: 저기요. 여기 불고기 이 인분 주세요.
웨이터: 네 알겠습니다.
수진: 그리고 소주 두 병 주세요.
웨이터: 소주는 어떤 것으로 드릴까요?
수진: 센 것으로 주세요.
웨이터: 네 알겠습니다.
수진: 카드로 계산해도 돼요?
웨이터: 네, 돼요.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Sujin: Excuse me. Bulgogi for two people over here, please.
Waiter: Okay.
Sujin: Also two bottles of soju please.
Waiter: Which type of soju can I get you?
Sujin: The strong type, please.
Waiter: Okay.
Sujin: Can I pay with my credit card?
Waiter: Yes you can.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: It sounds like Korean people always order alcohol when they order food, like in the dialogue.
Suhyun: That’s true, especially when we eat out for dinner.
Michael: Personally, I like having tea with my meals, especially the Five-Flavor Tea.
Suhyun: You mean, 오미자차, right?
Michael: That’s right. First, I like the name. It literally says “the tea with five flavors.” I haven’t counted up to five, but it tastes different for each sip!
Suhyun: That’s true. Actually I like to drink the 오미자차 on hot summer days because it tastes stronger than other teas, and I feel more refreshed when I drink it.
Michael: Definitely! So Suhyun, why don’t we have Bulgogi with this tea instead?
Suhyun: Well.. I’m not sure if it’s going to make a good match, but we can go to one of the traditional Korean cafes instead and have some traditional snacks.
Michael: That sounds good too. Listeners, make sure you try both! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Suhyun: 인분 [natural native speed]
Michael: portion per a person
Suhyun: 인분 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 인분 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 소주 [natural native speed]
Michael: Soju, Korean distilled beverage
Suhyun: 소주 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 소주 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 어떤 [natural native speed]
Michael: what kind of
Suhyun: 어떤 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 어떤 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 세다 [natural native speed]
Michael: to be strong
Suhyun: 세다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 세다 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 카드 [natural native speed]
Michael: card, credit card
Suhyun: 카드 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 카드 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 계산 [natural native speed]
Michael: calculation, sum, pay
Suhyun: 계산 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 계산 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 저기요 [natural native speed]
Michael: excuse me
Suhyun: 저기요[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 저기요 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 여기 [natural native speed]
Michael: here, this place
Suhyun: 여기[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 여기 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...
Suhyun: 카드
Michael: Meaning "card” or “credit card". This word basically originated from the English word “card”.
Suhyun: You can use the word 카드 (kadeu) to refer to credit cards, bank cards, or methods of paying.
Michael: If you want to say that you will pay with your credit card, you can add the particle...
Suhyun: 로
Michael: ...which means “by” or “with” and say..
Suhyun: 계산할게요
Michael: meaning “I’ll pay.” So if you want to pay a taxi fee using a credit card, you can say..
Suhyun: 카드로 계산할게요
Michael: meaning "I'll pay with my credit card”. You can find the same word in a question like
Suhyun: 카드로 결제하시겠어요?
Michael: Which means "Would you like to pay with your card?" Okay, what's the next word?
Suhyun: 인분
Michael: meaning "portion per a person". You will hear this word a lot in a restaurant.
Suhyun: That’s right. For example, with the word 일 meaning “one”, you will hear 일인분
Michael: “The portion per one person.”
Suhyun: Or for “two” you will hear 이인분
Michael: The portion per two persons.”
Suhyun: 인 (in) means “person” and 분 (bun) means “per”, so 인분 (inbun) literally means “per a person”.
Michael: All you need to do is just add the number of portions you want to receive. For example.
Suhyun: 일인분주세요
Michael: “Please give me one portion of...”
Suhyun: 불고기 3 인분 주세요
Michael: "Please give me three servings of bulgogi. "
Suhyun: 삼 is the number for “three” so 삼 인분 means “the portion for three people.”
Michael: Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn several honorific Korean expressions that you can use when you’re ordering food in a Korean restaurant.
Suhyun: If you know these expressions, you can have a fluent conversation with local people at least twice or three times a day!
Michael: And when you order things in Korean, you will sometimes get more food because Korean people like foreigners who try to speak Korean, so that’s a bonus!
Suhyun: The first expression is the most important one. If you want to get someone’s attention, you can raise your hand and say 저기요.
Michael: You can use this phrase, for example, to call for a waiter in a restaurant or at any other place where you need some assistance, like a shop or a hotel.
Suhyun: Right. It’s simple. Just raise your hand, make eye-contact with the staff, and say 저기요.
Michael: After you’ve called over the waiter, you will want to order some food.
Suhyun: If you already know the name of the food, you can simply say 주세요. which means “please give.”
Michael: But don’t worry if you don’t know the name. Simply point to the food name or picture on the menu and say..
Suhyun: 이거 주세요
Michael: “Please give me this”.
Suhyun: 이거 (igeo) means "this", and 주세요 (juseyo) literally means “give”. But here we can translate it as "please." 이거 주세요
Michael: Literally, the phrase means "this, give," but we can interpret it as "this, please." Suhyun, what if I want to ask for water?
Suhyun: That’s very simple. Just replace 이거 (igeo) meaning "this" with 물 (mul) meaning “water”. Then you can say 주세요. 물 주세요
Michael: “Water, please”. Or literally “Please give me water.” How would you say “Please, give me juice?”
Suhyun: “juice” in Korean is 주스 (juseu). So, you can put the word 주스 then say 주세요. 주스 주세요
Michael: “Juice, please”. If the staff understood what you said, you will only have one more expression left to say.
Suhyun: Which is.. 계산할게요. 계산 (gyesan) means "calculating” but it’s used to mean “paying”. Then it has the verb 할게요 (halgeyo) which means "I'll do." So 계산할게요 (gyesanhalgeyo) literally means "I'll pay."
Michael: So.. after you have a meal, you can call over the waiter by saying..
Suhyun: 저기요..
Michael: meaning “Excuse me!” and then say..
Suhyun: ..계산할게요
Michael:.. which means “Check, please” or “I'll pay”. And here’s one more extra. Basically Koreans don't share the bill, so if you are with your Korean friend , that person will want to pay for you. In this case you will hear the phrase….
Suhyun: 제가 살게요
Michael: Which means “I’ll treat you.”
Suhyun: 제가 (jega) means "I", and 살게요 (salgeyo) is a casual way to say "will buy". So all togehter 제가 살게요 means “I’ll treat you” or literally “I will buy.”

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Listeners, please be sure to check the lesson notes for more examples and explanations. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Suhyun: 안녕히 계세요.

3 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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What's your favorite Korean drink?

KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 2:02 pm
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Hi Ian,


Thanks for posting. It tastes great cold, especially in the summer! Hope you will be able to try it one day.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Ian
Friday at 8:49 am
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This five flavoured tea sounds very interesting. :sunglasses: