Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Finding Your Way Around a Korean Hotel. Michael here.
Suhyun: 안녕하세요. (Annyeonghaseyo.) I'm Suhyun.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to give directions using honorific Korean. The conversation takes place at a hotel reception desk.
Suhyun: It's between Minho and a hotel clerk.
Michael: The speakers are not familiar with each other; so they’ll be using honorific Korean. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

민호: 저기요, 방까지 어떻게 가면 돼요?
직원: 네, 엘리베이터로 4층까지 올라가세요.
민호: 네, 그 다음은요?
직원: 엘리베이터에서 내려서 오른쪽으로 쭉 가시면 202호가 있습니다.
민호: 오른쪽으로 가면 돼요?
직원: 네, 쭉 가시면 202호가 있습니다.
Michael: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
민호: 저기요, 방까지 어떻게 가면 돼요?
직원: 네, 엘리베이터로 4층까지 올라가세요.
민호: 네, 그 다음은요?
직원: 엘리베이터에서 내려서 오른쪽으로 쭉 가시면 202호가 있습니다.
민호: 오른쪽으로 가면 돼요?
직원: 네, 쭉 가시면 202호가 있습니다.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Minho: Excuse me? How do we get to our room?
Clerk: Yes, go up to the 4th floor using the elevator please.
Minho: Yes, and then after that?
Clerk: After you get off the elevator, if you take a right and go straight, room number 202 will be there.
Minho: Take a right?
Clerk: Yes, go straight and room number 202 is there.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Suhyun: Michael, do you know what address systems Korea uses?
Michael: Actually, I think it’s pretty confusing for foreigners because they have to remember two systems. That’s right, listeners - there are two address systems in Korea!
Suhyun: Yes, and the old system is still used even though we’ve also started using the new system.
Michael: The old system is called the East Asian system. This system uses the name of a neighborhood in the address.
Suhyun: For example, the old system had the address as the city name, ward name, the neighborhood’s name and four digits indicating the area where the building is located.
Michael: So even though two buildings were on the same road, they had a different address if they were in different neighborhoods. Also, the way to give the numbers was not standardized, so it was not easy to find a building using the old address.
Suhyun: That’s true. It was quite common to find a building numbered 44 next to one numbered 21. So that’s why Korea started using a new road name address system that is like the address system in the U.S. or Canada.
Michael: Right. It uses nearby street names and house numbers only after the city and ward names. And the numbers are added to each house in order, so it’s easier for everyone.
Suhyun: If you’re new to South Korea, ask people to give you the address under the new address system. It should be much easier to find places.
Michael: That’s a good tip! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Suhyun: 방 [natural native speed]
Michael: a room
Suhyun: 방 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 방 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 층 [natural native speed]
Michael: story, floor
Suhyun: 층 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 층 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 쭉 [natural native speed]
Michael: straight, directly
Suhyun: 쭉 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 쭉 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 오른쪽 [natural native speed]
Michael: right, right side
Suhyun: 오른쪽 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 오른쪽 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 올라가다 [natural native speed]
Michael: to go up, to climb
Suhyun: 올라가다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 올라가다 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 호 [natural native speed]
Michael: a counter for a room number
Suhyun: 호 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 호 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 다음 [natural native speed]
Michael: next, next time
Suhyun: 다음 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 다음 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 엘리베이터 [natural native speed]
Michael: elevator
Suhyun: 엘리베이터[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 엘리베이터 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 저기요 [natural native speed]
Michael: excuse me
Suhyun: 저기요[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 저기요 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Suhyun: 저기요
Michael: meaning "Excuse me." or “Pardon me”. You can use this phrase in various situations, but mostly when you want to get attention at a restaurant.
Suhyun: But note that you can’t use this expression for asking forgiveness, as you would say “Excuse me” in English, when you bump into a stranger on the street.
Michael: It’s mostly used when someone wants to call a waiter.
Suhyun: Right. For example, if you need one more bottle of Soju, you can raise your hand and say 저기요, 소주 한 병 주세요.
Michael: ...which means "Excuse me, one bottle of soju, please." Okay, what's the next word?
Suhyun: 쭉 가다
Michael: meaning "go straight".
Suhyun: 쭉 is an adjective meaning “straight" or "directly" and 가다 is a verb meaning "to go". So it means “go straight” 쭉 가다.
Michael: You can use this phrase to explain directions to someone. For example, you can say to a taxi driver...
Suhyun: 쭉 가 주세요
Michael: ...when you want to say “Please go straight”.
Suhyun: Here, we used the extra word 주세요 which literally means “Please give” as you ask someone to do you a favor.
Michael: Or you can give someone else directions by saying...
Suhyun: 쭉 가세요
Michael: meaning “Go straight, please.” Suhyun, how can we use this phrase in a sentence?
Suhyun: For example, when you give directions to someone else, you can say 여기서 쭉 가세요.
Michael: Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson you will learn how to give directions using honorific Korean. You always need to use honorific verbs when you’re talking to a stranger, including taxi drivers. So make sure to remember these expressions to make your Korean sound polite. Okay, what’s the first expression?
Suhyun: 오른쪽으로 가세요
Michael: It means “turn right please”. Suhyun, can you break down this phrase?
Suhyun: Sure. First it has the word 오른쪽 (oreunjjok) meaning "right," or "right side.". Then it has the particle 으로 (euro) which can be translated as the preposition "to" and the verb 가세요 (gaseyo) which means “to go”. All together, it’s 오른쪽으로 가세요.
Michael: “Please turn right” or literally "right, to, go, please." What about “turn left please”?
Suhyun: It’s very simple. Just replace 오른쪽 (oreunjjok) meaning "right", with 왼쪽 (oenjjok). 왼쪽 means “left" or "left side". Everything else stays the same.
Michael: So altogether, it will be...?
Suhyun: 왼쪽으로 가세요
Michael: “Please turn left.” What if the destination is on your left and you want to say “It’s on the left”?
Suhyun: You can say 왼쪽에 있어요. The phrase starts with the word 왼쪽 (eonjjok) meaning "left" and is followed by the location marking particle 에 which means like “at” or “on”. Finally, it has the verb 있어요 meaning “there is.”
Michael: So altogether we have...
Suhyun: 왼쪽에 있어요.
Michael: “It’s on the left” or literally “Left, on, there is.” What about “It’s on the right”?
Suhyun: To say “it’s on the right” just replace 왼쪽 with 오른쪽 and say 오른쪽에 있어요.
Michael: “Its on the right.” Suhyun, can you give us a few sample sentences with the phrases we've learned in this lesson?
Suhyun: Sure! 쭉 가시면 오른쪽에 은행이 있어요.
Michael: This means "If you go straight there is a bank on the right."
Suhyun: 쭉 가다 is the phrase that we learned in the previous section. It means “go straight” and with the particle 면 meaning “if”, you can mean “If you go straight.” 쭉 가면
Michael: Then we have the phrase meaning “it’s on the right.”
Suhyun: 오른쪽에 있어요. When you make the phrase more specific, you can add the name of the destination with the subject-marking particle 이 or 가, and put it right before the word 있어요 meaning “there is.”
Michael: So for “The bank is on the right”, you can say..
Suhyun: 오른쪽에
Michael: “on the right”
Suhyun: 은행이
Michael: “The bank” and the subject-marking particle.
Suhyun: 있어요.
Michael: “there is.”
Suhyun: 오른쪽에 은행이 있어요.
Michael: “There is a bank on the right.” In the lesson notes, there are more useful phrases to give directions in honorific Korean, and also how to use a phrase like
Suhyun: 내려주세요
Michael: meaning “Please stop here.” or literally “Please get me off here.” So be sure to check out the lesson notes, listeners!

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Suhyun: 안녕히 계세요. (Annyeonghi gyeseyo.)

9 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Do you know why there is no 4th floor in Korean hospitals?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:39 PM
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Hello DIYOTAMA MAZUMDER / 디요터마 마줌다르,


Yes, you are right! 4 has the same sound as 'death' (the Sino Korean word/Chinese word).


Enjoy your study and feel free to let us know if you have any inquiries!


Kind regards,

Hyeon Yeong Seo

Team KoreanClass101.com

DIYOTAMA MAZUMDER / 디요터마 마줌다르
Wednesday at 03:18 PM
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can we say 왼쪽에 가세요 in place of 왼쪽으로 가세요 ?

And is this sentence correct ? I have tried one

왼쪽에 가고 쭉에 갈 거예요 . [ I am going left and I will go straight }

DIYOTAMA MAZUMDER / 디요터마 마줌다르
Wednesday at 01:22 PM
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Teacher I have heard that the number '4' is very much unlucky according to Koreans . Because it sounds like the word ' death ' in the Sino Korean number system . And I have heard that they write the 4th floor as 'F' if I am not wrong . Am I right teacher ?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 11:10 PM
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Hi Robert, rio,


Thank you for posting! Like Rio said, 4 has the same sound as 'death' (the Sino Korean word/Chinese word), which is why in older buildings, there is no official 'fourth' floor (they skip it).


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

rio
Wednesday at 12:44 AM
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4자 기피 때문인 것 같아요 🤔The number 4 is related to death and so most Asian countries avoid this number!

robert groulx
Monday at 01:12 AM
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thank you for the lesson


there is 4th floor 6. 4층까지 엘리베이터로 가세요. (sacheungkkaji elibeiteoro gaseyo.) "Please go up to the 4th floor by an elevator.")


. It was quite common to find a building numbered 44 next to one numbered 21. So that’s why Korea started using a new road name address system that is like the address system in the U.S. or Canada.


robert

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 07:22 AM
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Hi Hanan,


Thanks for the emoticon!

Please let us know if you have any inquiries.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

hanan
Friday at 10:06 PM
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👍good