Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: What Do You Do on the Weekends in Korea? Michael Here.
Suhyun: 안녕하세요. (Annyeonghaseyo.) I'm Suhyun.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about what you are going to do in future. The conversation takes place on the subway.
Suhyun: It's between Sujin and Minho.
Michael: The speakers will be using honorific Korean. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
Suhyun, please read Sujin’s lines.
수진: 민호 씨, 주말에 뭐 해요?
민호: 주말에 등산할 거예요.
수진: 누구랑 등산할 거예요?
민호: 남동생하고 등산할 거에요.
수진: 그래요? 어디서 등산해요?
민호: 설악산에 갈 거예요. 평소에 설악산에서 등산을 많이 해요.
수진: 재미있겠어요.
Michael: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
수진: 민호 씨, 주말에 뭐 해요?
민호: 주말에 등산할 거예요.
수진: 누구랑 등산할 거예요?
민호: 남동생하고 등산할 거예요.
수진: 그래요? 어디서 등산해요?
민호: 설악산에 갈 거예요. 평소에 설악산에서 등산을 많이 해요.
수진: 재미있겠어요.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Sujin: Minho, what do you do on weekends?
Minho: I go hiking on weekends.
Sujin: Who do you go hiking with?
Minho: I will go hiking with my little brother.
Sujin: Really? Where do you go hiking?
Minho: We're going to Seorak Mountain. We hike at Seorak Mountain a lot.
Sujin: That sounds like fun.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: So they’re talking about mountain climbing! Suhyun, isn’t that the most popular activity in South Korea?
Suhyun: It is! In Korean, we call it 등산 and it's very popular among both young and old people.
Michael: I guess it's because of the beauty of the Korean mountains in autumn. My friend who lives in Korea told me that they saw lots of Koreans dressed in special mountain climbing clothes in subways or trains almost every weekend.
Suhyun: Well, I can guarantee they were heading to the mountains for a day of hiking and drinking 막걸리, a traditional Korean alcoholic drink made out of rice.
Michael: That sounds like fun. Seoul in particular is surrounded by mountains, so it’s easy to go to a mountain nearby with your friends and enjoy some hiking.
Suhyun: And the view of Seoul from the top of the mountain is great.
Michael: If you get the chance, listeners, check it out! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is...
Suhyun: 주말 [natural native speed]
Michael: weekend
Suhyun: 주말[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 주말 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 등산하다 [natural native speed]
Michael: hiking, mountain climbing
Suhyun: 등산하다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 등산하다 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 남동생 [natural native speed]
Michael: younger brother
Suhyun: 남동생[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 남동생 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 많다 [natural native speed]
Michael: to be many, to be much
Suhyun: 많다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 많다 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 어디 [natural native speed]
Michael: where
Suhyun: 어디[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 어디 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 산 [natural native speed]
Michael: mountain
Suhyun: 산[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 산 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 그렇다 [natural native speed]
Michael: to be so
Suhyun: 그렇다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 그렇다 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 하고 [natural native speed]
Michael: with
Suhyun: 하고[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 하고 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 평소 [natural native speed]
Michael: usual
Suhyun: 평소[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 평소 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first expression is..
Suhyun: 주말에 뭐 해요?
Michael: meaning "What will you do on the weekend?" or “Weekend on what do?” Suhyun, can you break this down?
Suhyun: Sure thing! We have the noun 주말 meaning “weekend” , the time marking particle 에 and the phrase 뭐 해요, which means “what to do?”
Michael: I think people use the last one a lot.
Suhyun: That’s right. 뭐 해요 or 뭐 해? is the common way to say “What are you doing?”
Michael: But it can be used to ask a question about the future, right?
Suhyun: That’s right. If you say 주말에 or “this weekend”, this already refers to something in the future, so you don’t need to say 뭐 해요 in the future tense.
Michael: So how can you say.. “What will you do this Sunday?”
Suhyun: You can replace 주말 meaning “weekend” with the word 일요일 meaning “Sunday” and say.. 일요일에 뭐 해요?
Michael: “What will you do this Sunday? Okay, what's the next word?
Suhyun: 하고
Michael: meaning "with” or “together". This word has exactly the same usage as the English “with”, just make sure you pay attention to the word order, as it is different from English.
Suhyun: Right. 하고 follows the object or subject.
Michael: For example.
Suhyun: 나하고
Michael: “with me”. Literally we have “me, with”. Can you give us an example using this word?
Suhyun: Sure. For example, you can say.. 저하고 같이 가는 사람들이 몇 명 있어요?
Michael: .. which means "How many people are going with me?" Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson, you will learn how to talk about what you are going to do in the future. This is also the basic way of forming the future tense in Korean. It's really very simple. All you need to do is use the structure ...
Suhyun: Verb-stem plus 을 거예요, when a verb-stem ends in a consonant.
Michael: Using this, how can you say “I will eat?”
Suhyun: 먹 is the verb-stem of the verb 먹다 meaning “to eat” and its verb-stem ends in a consonant. So you can say 먹, then add 을 거예요. 먹을 거예요.
Michael: “I will eat.” What if a verb-stem ends in a vowel?
Suhyun: Let’s use the verb 가다. meaning “to go.” 가 is the verb-stem, and it ends in a vowel. So first add the batchim or the last consonant ㄹ.
Michael: It will add an extra “L” sound.
Suhyun: Right. So 가 becomes 갈. Then simply add 거예요. 갈 거예요.
Michael: Which means “I will go.”
Suhyun: 갈 거예요, and 먹을 거예요 are for formal situations as they end with 요. If it’s for a casual situation, you can say 을 거야.
Michael: So “I will eat” in a casual situation will be..?
Suhyun: 먹을 거야. And “I’ll go” becomes 갈 거야.
Michael: Okay. Let's quiz the listeners with another verb.
Suhyun: Sure thing! We have the verb 나가다 meaning “to leave.”
Michael: Using this verb, listeners, can you say “I will leave” in a formal situation? Okay, you have three seconds.
(Pause)
Michael: Did you get it? The answer is..
Suhyun: 나갈 거예요. The verb-stem 나가 ends in a vowel, so you can add the batchim ㄹ and say 거예요. 나갈 거예요.
Michael: “I will leave.” Great! I think that’s pretty easy! Let's give some sample sentences.
Suhyun: Sure. 오늘 밖에서 밥 먹을 거예요?
Michael: "Are you going to eat outside today?
Suhyun: And next we have.. 오늘 뭐 할 거예요?
Michael: "What are you going to do today?"
Suhyun: 하다 is the verb meaning “to do” and its verb-stem ends in a vowel.
Michael: Listeners, for more example and explanations please check the PDF lesson notes.

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Suhyun: 안녕히 계세요. (Annyeonghi gyeseyo.)

26 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

What are you going to do this weekend?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 03:52 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello Liviu,


-ㄹ/을게요 can be used to indicate a persons intention or plan. Comparing to -ㄹ/을 거예요, -ㄹ/을게요 is more like a 'commitment‘ than just a 'plan' or 'will'.


오늘 숙제를 할 거예요. I will do my homework today. (plan)

오늘 숙제를 할게요. I will do my homework today. (commitment. promise)


Kind regards,

Hyeon Yeong Seo

Team KoreanClass101.com

Liviu
Thursday at 06:36 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi guys,


What is the difference between conjugation with ㄹ/을 거예요 and ㄹ/을게요?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 04:22 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello DIYOTAMA MAZUMDER / 디요터마 마줌다르


저는 이 주말에 한국어를 많이 공부할 거예요 .

-> 저는 이번 주말에 한국어를 많이 공부할 거예요.


Thanks for posting. Keep up the good work!


Kind regards,

Hyeon Yeong Seo

Team KoreanClass101.com

DIYOTAMA MAZUMDER / 디요터마 마줌다르
Monday at 02:15 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

저는 이 주말에 한국어를 많이 공부할 거예요 .

This weekend I am going to study Korean a lot .😄😄

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:06 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Farah,


Thank you for posting, great job! Keep up the good work!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Farah
Wednesday at 10:38 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

이번 주말에 한국어 공부를 할 거예요~ 😄

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 07:06 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi 5,


Thanks for posting. The phrases 랑/하고 mean 'and/with', whereas 함께 means 'together'.

Hope this helped!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

5
Tuesday at 04:34 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello,

I would like to ask the difference between 랑/하거 and 함께.

Thank you so much.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 11:30 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jessica,


Thanks for posting. Let's take a look at what you wrote:


주말에 저는 밖에 달릴 거예요. ---> 밖에서


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Jessica / 제시카
Friday at 05:52 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

안녕하세요,


Practice Sentence:


주말에 저는 밖에 달릴 거예요.


감사합니다,

제시카