Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Michael: Hi everyone, and welcome to KoreanClass101.com This is Lower Beginner, Season 1 Lesson 1 - Talking About the Korean Weather. Michael Here.
Suhyun: 안녕하세요. I'm Suhyun.
Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about weather conditions in Korean. The conversation takes place in a coffee shop.
Suhyun: It's between Sujin and Minho.
Michael: The speakers are acquaintances, so they’ll be using honorific Korean. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

수진: 민호 씨, 오늘 날씨가 어때요?
민호: 오늘은 날씨가 더워요.
수진: 날씨가 많이 더워요?
민호: 아니요. 많이 안 더워요.
수진: 내일 날씨는요?
민호: 내일 날씨는 추워요. 그리고 비가 와요.
Michael: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
수진: 민호 씨, 오늘 날씨가 어때요?
민호: 오늘은 날씨가 더워요.
수진: 날씨가 많이 더워요?
민호: 아니요. 많이 안 더워요.
수진: 내일 날씨는요?
민호: 내일 날씨는 추워요. 그리고 비가 와요.
Michael: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Sujin: Minho, how's the weather today?
Minho: It's hot today.
Sujin: Is the weather really hot?
Minho: No, the weather isn't that hot.
Sujin: What about tomorrow's weather?
Minho: Tomorrow's weather will be cold. But it will rain.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Michael: Suhyun, I've heard that there are three special days that mark the beginning, middle, and end of summer. What are they called?
Suhyun: Well, we have 초복 (chobok), 중복(jungbok) and 말복(malbok). They literally mean “the beginning of the summer, “the middle of the summer” and “the end of the summer” respectively.
Michael: And they are following the lunar calendar, right?
Suhyun: That’s right. That’s why the dates change every year. They usually take place between June and July in the lunar calendar, or July to August in the solar calendar.
Michael: Listeners, Korean people believe that the best way to fight against the summer heat is to have hot, nutritious soup, so you’ll see long lines in front of restaurants that sell chicken soup on these three holidays.
Suhyun: That’s right. And since we believe hot foods are so beneficial, we make the dishes even hotter by adding spicy ingredients, as in 삼계탕 or, “chicken soup with ginseng.”
Michael: Eating hot soup in the hot summer with hot spices...that sounds interesting!
VOCAB LIST
Michael: Okay! Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Suhyun: 씨 [natural native speed]
Michael: Mr. Ms. Mrs.
Suhyun: 씨[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 씨 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 오늘 [natural native speed]
Michael: today
Suhyun: 오늘[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 오늘 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 날씨 [natural native speed]
Michael: weather
Suhyun: 날씨[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 날씨 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 덥다 [natural native speed]
Michael: to be hot
Suhyun: 덥다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 덥다 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 많이 [natural native speed]
Michael: a lot
Suhyun: 많이[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 많이 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 내일 [natural native speed]
Michael: tomorrow
Suhyun: 내일[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 내일 [natural native speed]
Michael: Next we have..
Suhyun: 춥다 [natural native speed]
Michael: to be cold
Suhyun: 춥다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 춥다 [natural native speed]
Michael: And last..
Suhyun: 비가 오다 [natural native speed]
Michael: to rain, to be raining
Suhyun: 비가 오다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Suhyun: 비가 오다 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Michael: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Suhyun: 오늘
Michael: meaning "today”.
Suhyun: This word can be used alone, as in 오늘은 일요일이다.
Michael: “Today is Sunday.”
Suhyun: ...or with other nouns indicating times, such as 아침 and 저녁, which mean “morning” and “evening”.
Michael: Using these, you can say “this morning” and “this evening” in Korean, right?
Suhyun: That’s right. 오늘 아침 literally means “today morning” and you can use it to mean “this morning”.
Michael: And what is “this evening” in Korean?
Suhyun: It’s 오늘 저녁. 오늘 is the word that means “today” and 저녁 means “evening”, so altogether it means “this evening”.
Michael: Talking about days, in Korean, there are individual words to describe “two days ago” or “two days after today.” Can you explain them, Suhyun?
Suhyun: Sure! In addition to 어제 meaning “yesterday” and 내일 meaning “tomorrow”, there are words like 그저께
Michael: meaning “two days ago”.
Suhyun: 그끄저께
Michael: meaning “three days ago”.
Suhyun: 모레
Michael: meaning “the day after tomorrow”.
Suhyun: And.. finally 글피
Michael: “two days after tomorrow”. Listeners, These are commonly used in Korean, so be sure to remember them well. And what’s the next word?
Suhyun: Next, we have 씨.
Michael: This is the honorific suffix that means something like "Mr. Ms. Mrs." This honorific suffix is one the most commonly used among people of relatively equal speech level.
Suhyun: That’s right. Koreans usually add this suffix after someone’s first name or full name. What’s your full name, Michael?
Michael: Michael Porter. Michael is my first name, and Porter is my family name.
Suhyun: Okay, so Korean people would call you 마이클 씨, using your first name, and then the suffix 씨. Unlike English, you don’t use someone’s family name to address the other person politely.
Michael: I see. So people will never call me like Porter then the suffix.
Suhyun: That’s right. But if they want to be more polite, they will call you by your full name with the suffix. In Korean that would be 마이클 포터씨.
Michael: Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Michael: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to describe the weather in Korean. The weather and the temperature are always safe topics for making small talk, aren't they!
Suhyun: Definitely!
Michael: Okay, so let’s take a look at how to ask about the weather in Korean first.
Suhyun: A common phrase for asking about weather in Korean is 오늘 날씨가 어때요? (oneul nalssiga eottaeyo?)
Michael: This literally means “Today’s weather is how?” or “How’s today’s weather?”.
Suhyun: Let’s break it down. First, we have 오늘 날씨, which means “today’s weather”.
Michael: Although it literally means “today weather” you can assume that there’s a possessive pronoun
Suhyun: 의
Michael: ... hidden between the two words.
Suhyun: So 오늘의 날씨 and 오늘 날씨 mean the same thing - “today’s weather”.
Michael: And next?
Suhyun: Next we have the subject-marking particle 가, then we have the verb 어때요, which is like “how is”, as in a question.
Michael: So the full phrase is..?
Suhyun: 오늘 날씨가 어때요?
Michael: which means “How is today’s weather?”. Okay, if the weather is sunny today, how can you answer the question in Korean?
Suhyun: It’s simple - 오늘 날씨는 맑아요. 오늘 날씨is the word meaning “today’s weather”, 는 is the topic marking particle.
Michael: You need to use the topic particle as you’re talking about a topic that someone already mentioned.
Suhyun: Then we have the adjective 맑아요 meaning “sunny.”
Michael: So altogether, it’s..?
Suhyun: 오늘 날씨는 맑아요.
Michael: Which means “It’s sunny.” or literally “Today’s weather is sunny.”
Suhyun: Or you can simply say 오늘은 맑아요 without saying the noun 날씨 which means “weather.”
Michael: How would you say “it’s raining”?
Suhyun: You can replace 맑아요 meaning “sunny” with the phrase 비가 와요 which means “it’s raining.” or literally “Rain is coming”- 오늘은 비가 와요.
Michael: “It’s raining today.” or literally “Today, rain is coming.”
Suhyun: Here, we used the phrase 비가 와요 instead of just one word. In the phrase, it has the verb 와요 meaning “to come”. In that case, you cannot say 오늘 날씨는 비가 와요, using the word 날씨 meaning “weather.”
Michael: I see. Does the same rule apply to “it’s snowing”?
Suhyun: It does. 눈이 와요 is the phrase meaning “snowing” in Korean. It literally means “snow is coming” with the verb 와요 which means “to come”. Therefore, you can only say 오늘은 눈이 와요 to mean “Today it’s snowing.”
Michael: What if you want to talk about tomorrow?
Suhyun: You can replace the word 오늘 meaning “today” with the noun 내일 meaning “tomorrow”. 내일은 눈이 와요.
Michael: Which means “It’s snowing tomorrow.” Listeners, make sure to check the PDF lesson notes to learn more expressions for describing the weather in Korean.

Outro

Michael: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Suhyun: 안녕히 계세요.

23 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
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What's the weather today? Tell us in Korean.

KoreanClass101.com
Thursday at 8:42 pm
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Hi Cindy,


LOL all's well that ends well--if the phrase stuck in your brain, then it is one more phrase learned! ?

Please let us know if you have any other questions!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Cindy
Thursday at 1:55 am
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Thank you for the clarification, Lyn! It is a bit confusing, but good to know it wasn't an outright error :wink: I think this will stick in my brain...

KoreanClass101.com
Wednesday at 11:18 pm
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Hi Cindy,


Thank you for posting, sorry for the confusion! The dictionary form for 'raining' would be '비가 오다', '비가 온다' means 'it is (currently) raining'.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Cindy
Sunday at 5:40 pm
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In the materials for this lesson, sometimes the dictionary form of the verb used with "to be raining" is oda (오다) and other times onda (온다). Are these the same or is the use of the one or the other incorrect?C

KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 2:18 am
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안녕하세요 Dana,


Great to have you here!


Please stay tuned, as we'll have new lessons for you every week! And if you have any questions, feel free to ask us.:wink:


Cristiane

Team KoreanClass101.com

Dana
Thursday at 10:26 pm
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I learned much faster when I started reading and reviewing here in Koreanclass101!!! Thank you!

KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 4:42 pm
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Hello Ian,


Thank you for posting.

We're glad to hear that you liked our previous series as well. :thumbsup:


Let us know if you have any question.

Cheers,

Lena

Team KoreanClass101.com

Ian
Sunday at 11:36 pm
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I like this series but miss the casual banter found in your older series with Keith, Tim and Hyunwoo. It was very funny and broke up the learning process nicely. :smile:

KoreanClass101.com
Saturday at 8:42 am
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Hi Andy,


Thanks for the positive feedback! :thumbs:

Please let us know if you have any other inquiries.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Andy
Friday at 3:10 am
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:thumbsup: