Dialogue

Vocabulary

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๐Ÿ˜„ ๐Ÿ˜ž ๐Ÿ˜ณ ๐Ÿ˜ ๐Ÿ˜’ ๐Ÿ˜Ž ๐Ÿ˜  ๐Ÿ˜† ๐Ÿ˜… ๐Ÿ˜œ ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜‡ ๐Ÿ˜ด ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ˜ˆ โค๏ธ๏ธ ๐Ÿ‘

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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How would you describe the difference between "Namjaneun yeojareul saranghanda" and "Namjaneun yeojareul saranghaGOITTA". Because most of the time, I notice the video says "itta" for the verb endings, with a few exceptions here and there...

Mikhail Gorbachev
Monday at 04:39 AM
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I meant ๋‹น์‹ .

Mikhail Gorbachev
Monday at 04:37 AM
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It says


honey, darling (between a

married couple)


for ๊ฐ•์‹  in the PDF notes. Shouldn't it be "you"?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:50 PM
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You are on the right track, Heeya!


-itta certainly emphasizes on the action rather than something abstract like love as you have mentioned.


Not to make you confuse you though, you could also say ๊ทธ ์‚ฌ๋žŒ์„ ์‚ฌ๋ž‘ํ•ฉ๋‹ˆ๋‹ค which means 'I love that person' or even ์‚ฌ๋ž‘ํ•ด '(I) love you' as you may have heard of from some tv shows!


But I would say it is very much where the speaker puts the focus on and for the case of "to like, to love", the word itself may also have ongoing context so that you don't need to put extra emphasis through other particles like -itta.


Sorry for such wordy answer but hope you catch bit of context here and also you will naturally pick that up as you learn more and more as I could already see you are on the last episode!;)



Thank you


Madison

Team KoreanClass101.com

Heeya
Tuesday at 05:48 PM
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Thanks for the explanation Madison! It is a bit confusing but I could see how it would sound strange to use "hagoitta" with the sentence "A man loves a woman" because it's more abstract and it is indefinite versus, when someone is say, eating,because the eating action will come to an end so it sounds OK to use "mukoitta" as the ongoing tense...am I understanding this correctly? : - )

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 04:38 PM
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Hi Heeya,



Good point! The biggest difference in between is if it is ongoing or neutral.


-hada basically means to do (something) - in this case to love, while

-hagoitta is is/are + doing (something) - am in love, are in love or so.


It may not make exactly sense if compared to English, but -itta basically emphasizes the ongoing status.


So if you like something or someone in general (e.g. i love this poet) then you could use -hada. On the other hand, if you would like to say especially something present (e.g. I am in love with pilates) then you could certainly use -itta.


Does that make sense to you?:)





Thank you


Madison

Team KoreanClass101.com