Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Gyeong-eun: 안녕하세요, 최경은입니다!
Hyunwoo: Hyunwoo here. Do You Understand What You Shouldn’t Do in Korean? So 경은 씨, in this lesson, what are we going to learn?
Gyeong-eun: In this lesson, we are going to learn how to say “someone shouldn’t do (something)”.
Hyunwoo: This conversation takes place
Gyeong-eun: in the army.
Hyunwoo: Army!
Gyeong-eun: Yeah!
Hyunwoo: And the conversation is between
Gyeong-eun: two soldiers.
Hyunwoo: One is higher in ranking than the other, so they are using 반말 and 존댓말 respectively to each other.
Gyeong-eun: 네!
Hyunwoo: Okay, now, let’s listen to the conversation!
Gyeong-eun: 네, 들어 봐요.
DIALOGUE
이등병: 안녕하십니까. 유명렬입니다.
상병: 오. 이등병! 이리 와 봐.
이등병: 이병 유명렬.
상병: 오... 잘하는데? 유명렬?
이등병: 이병 유명렬.
상병: 니가 앞으로 하면 안 되는 일들이다.
이등병: 이병 유명렬.
상병: 이름 그만 말해. 시끄러워. 넌 앞으로 혼자 돌아다니면 안 돼.
이등병: 네. 알겠습니다.
상병: 그리고 낮에 낮잠 자면 안 돼.
이등병: 네. 알겠습니다.
상병: 그리고 집에 전화하면 안 돼.
이등병: 네. 알겠습니다.
상병: 그리고 밤에 자면 안 돼.
이등병: 네. 알겠... 네? 그럼 언제...
상병: 그리고 말대꾸 하면 안 돼!!!
Gyeong-eun: 영어로 한 번 더 (yeongeoro han beon deo).
Hyunwoo: One more time, with the English.
이등병: 안녕하십니까. 유명렬입니다.
Hyunwoo: Good afternoon, sir. My name is Yu Myeong Lyeol.
상병: 오. 이등병! 이리 와 봐.
Hyunwoo: Oh, Private Yu, come over here.
이등병: 이병 유명렬.
Hyunwoo: Yes, sir. Private Yu Myeong Lyeong.
상병: 오... 잘하는데? 유명렬?
Hyunwoo: Oh...you're good at that. Private Yu?
이등병: 이병 유명렬.
Hyunwoo: Yes, sir. Private Yu Myeong Lyeong.
상병: 니가 앞으로 하면 안 되는 일들이다.
Hyunwoo: You shouldn't do these things from now on.
이등병: 이병 유명렬.
Hyunwoo: Yes, sir. Private Yu Myeong Lyeong.
상병: 이름 그만 말해. 시끄러워. 넌 앞으로 혼자 돌아다니면 안 돼.
Hyunwoo: Stop saying your name. You're being noisy. You shouldn't wander about all alone from now on.
이등병: 네. 알겠습니다.
Hyunwoo: Yes, sir. Understood.
상병: 그리고 낮에 낮잠 자면 안 돼.
Hyunwoo: And you shouldn't take naps during the day.
이등병: 네. 알겠습니다.
Hyunwoo: Yes, sir. Understood.
상병: 그리고 집에 전화하면 안 돼.
Hyunwoo: And you shouldn't call home.
이등병: 네. 알겠습니다.
Hyunwoo: Yes, sir. Understood.
상병: 그리고 밤에 자면 안 돼.
Hyunwoo: And you shouldn't sleep at night.
이등병: 네. 알겠... 네? 그럼 언제...
Hyunwoo: Yes, sir...huh? Then when can I sleep?
상병: 그리고 말대꾸 하면 안 돼!!!
Hyunwoo: And you shouldn't talk back!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Hyunwoo: So 경은, you have a younger brother as far as I know, right? 남동생 있죠?
Gyeong-eun: 네, 맞아요.
Hyunwoo: And you have some male friends, 남자 친구들, who already did their military service, too, right?
Gyeong-eun: 네, 맞아요.
Hyunwoo: So what's the military service in Korean?
Gyeong-eun: 군복무.
Hyunwoo: And the military or the army is
Gyeong-eun: 군대.
Hyunwoo: And I bet you've heard a lot of stories about their experiences in 군대
Gyeong-eun: 네. 맞아요 정말 많이 들었어요. Even when I didn't really want to.
Hyunwoo: And they always talk about some weird, malignant superior soldier that liked to tease and bother them.
Gyeong-eun: Exactly! Just like in this dialogue.
Hyunwoo: Well, but it's actually mostly true. I've had people like them in my unit too.
Gyeong-eun: Oh really? Is it because they are actually bad people? Or...
Hyunwoo: Not necessarily. 꼭 그런 건 아니에요. I think it's the environment that makes people .. not so nice sometimes.
Gyeong-eun: So... were YOU also this kind of bad superior to your junior soldiers?
Hyunwoo: Of course not! Look at me! 당연히 아니죠! Can you imagine me being not nice to people? 상상이 되세요?
Gyeong-eun: Very easily. 쉽게 상상이 되는데요?
Hyunwoo: I don't hear you very well. Let's go on to the vocab now.
Gyeong-eun: Okay.
VOCAB LIST
Hyunwoo: So what’s the first word?
Gyeong-eun: 이등병 [natural native speed]
Hyunwoo: private (soldier)
Gyeong-eun: 이등병 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gyeong-eun: 이등병 [natural native speed]
그 다음에는 : Next:
Gyeong-eun: 이리 [natural native speed]
Hyunwoo: here, over here
Gyeong-eun: 이리 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gyeong-eun: 이리 [natural native speed]
그 다음에는 : Next:
Gyeong-eun: 앞으로 [natural native speed]
Hyunwoo: from now on
Gyeong-eun: 앞으로 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gyeong-eun: 앞으로 [natural native speed]
And next : Next:
Gyeong-eun: 이름 [natural native speed]
Hyunwoo: name
Gyeong-eun: 이름 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gyeong-eun: 이름 [natural native speed]
그 다음 단어는 : Next:
Gyeong-eun: 그만 [natural native speed]
Hyunwoo: stop, no more
Gyeong-eun: 그만 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gyeong-eun: 그만 [natural native speed]
그 다음에는 : Next:
Gyeong-eun: 시끄럽다 [natural native speed]
Hyunwoo: to be noisy, to be loud
Gyeong-eun: 시끄럽다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gyeong-eun: 시끄럽다 [natural native speed]
그 다음에는 : Next:
Gyeong-eun: 돌아다니다 [natural native speed]
Hyunwoo: to go about, to walk around
Gyeong-eun: 돌아다니다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gyeong-eun: 돌아다니다 [natural native speed]
And next : Next:
Gyeong-eun: 낮잠 [natural native speed]
Hyunwoo: nap
Gyeong-eun: 낮잠 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gyeong-eun: 낮잠 [natural native speed]
Lastly: Next:
Gyeong-eun: 말대꾸하다 [natural native speed]
Hyunwoo: to talk back
Gyeong-eun: 말대꾸하다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Gyeong-eun: 말대꾸하다 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Hyunwoo: Okay, now let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. So the first word we are going to look at is,
Gyeong-eun: 앞으로
Hyunwoo: “from now on”
Gyeong-eun: (slow) 앞으로 / (normal) 앞으로
Hyunwoo: what is 앞?
Gyeong-eun: 앞 is “front, before”
Hyunwoo: Yeah, so 앞으로 means "toward the front" or "straight ahead".
Gyeong-eun: 네 맞아요. But when you are talking about time, it means "from now on"
Hyunwoo: I remember this scene in a movie, where a couple who broke up and then started seeing each other again say to each other... let's not meet from now on, but of course they are saying that in Korean, 우리 앞으로 만나지 말자. But actually they are joking, and the guy says, 우리 뒤로 만나자.
Gyeong-eun: Haha.
Hyunwoo: Do you remember which movie that was from?
Gyeong-eun: No.
Hyunwoo: I don’t remember which movie it was from but…
Gyeong-eun: What a lame joke.
Hyunwoo: It isn’t… it isn’t a lame joke, it isn’t. It’s actually really interesting, but um…앞으로, “from now on”, 앞으로 만나지 말자 means “let’s not meet”, but…
Gyeong-eun: That’s very sad.
Hyunwoo: Yeah, but when you hear “우리 뒤로 만나자", you instantly know it’s a joke. But anyway, what’s the next expression?
Gyeong-eun: 말대꾸하다
Hyunwoo: “to talk back to someone”
Gyeong-eun: (slow) 말대꾸하다 / (normal) 말대꾸하다
Hyunwoo: Let's break it down. what does 말 mean?
Gyeong-eun: It means “language/ word”,
Hyunwoo: and 대꾸하다?
Gyeong-eun: “to respond, or to show reaction to someone's remarks”.
Hyunwoo: But not in the most polite way, right?
Gyeong-eun: Yeah, so if you put them together, it's 말대꾸하다
Hyunwoo: “to talk back to someone”. And it's not just literally answering someone, but it means talking back while showing disagreement.
Gyeong-eun: 네, 맞아요.
Hyunwoo: Okay! Now let’s move on to the grammar point!

Lesson focus

Hyunwoo: What's the grammar point of this lesson?
Gyeong-eun: The grammar point of this lesson is how to say "should not" or "must not" in Korean, using -(으)면 안 되다.
Hyunwoo: As in the example?
Gyeong-eun: 혼자 가면 안 돼요.
Hyunwoo: "You should not go there alone."
Gyeong-eun: When you want to say that one should not do something or must not do something, you can use the structure, -(으)면 안 되다
Hyunwoo: The part 안 되다 literally means "to not become", but this phrase also has the meaning of "to be unable to do something" and "to be not supposed to do or happen."
Gyeong-eun: In everyday life, when it is used with the verb ending -(으)면, which indicates a condition, it almost always means "should not" or "must not."
Hyunwoo: Yeah, so how do you form a sentence with this structure?
Gyeong-eun: Verb stem + -(으)면 안 되다
Hyunwoo: For example?
Gyeong-eun: to go is 가다, so it becomes 가면 안 되다
Hyunwoo: “should not go”
Gyeong-eun: 가면 안 돼요.
Hyunwoo: "You should not go." Okay, let's look at how it was used in the dialogue for this lesson.
Gyeong-eun: 니가 앞으로 하면 안 되는 일들이다.
Hyunwoo: "You shouldn’t do these things from now on."
Gyeong-eun: 넌 앞으로 혼자 돌아다니면 안 돼.
Hyunwoo: "You shouldn't wander about all alone from now on."
Gyeong-eun: 그리고 낮에 낮잠 자면 안 돼.
Hyunwoo: "And you shouldn't take naps during the day."
Gyeong-eun: 그리고 집에 전화하면 안 돼.
Hyunwoo: "And you shouldn't call home."
Gyeong-eun: 그리고 밤에 자면 안 돼.
Hyunwoo: "And you shouldn't sleep at night."
Gyeong-eun: 그리고 말대꾸 하면 안 돼!!!
Hyunwoo: "And you shouldn't talk back!" Okay, now before we finish let's look at three more examples. How do you say "You can't drink alcohol here."?
Gyeong-eun: 여기에서 술 마시면 안 돼요.
Hyunwoo: "Can't I sell this?" "Am I not supposed to sell this?"
Gyeong-eun: 이거 팔면 안 돼요?
Hyunwoo: And how about, "You shouldn't/can't go alone."
Gyeong-eun: 혼자 가면 안 돼요!

Outro

Hyunwoo: Okay, great! 경은 씨, 오늘도 수고하셨어요!
Gyeong-eun: 네, 근데 현우 씨!
Hyunwoo: 네!
Gyeong-eun: 퇴근하면 안 돼요!
Hyunwoo: Me? I shouldn't go home? Haha, right after this recording, I’m gonna go home.
Gyeong-eun: 안 돼요.
Hyunwoo: 안 돼요? 왜 안 돼요? 집에 가서 일하면 안 돼요?
Gyeong-eun: 안 돼요!
Hyunwoo: 하하! 경은 씨, 내일부터 안 오면 안 돼요?
Gyeong-eun: 아, 감사합니다!
Hyunwoo: 어… 안 오면 안 돼요! 하하! Okay, that just about does it for today, so we’ll see you soon!
Gyeong-eun: 네, 안녕히 계세요.
Hyunwoo: 안녕히 계세요!

Grammar

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21 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 06:30 PM
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여러분, " -(으)면 안 되다" 로 예문을 만들어 보세요. :)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 02:33 AM
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안녕하세요 robert groulx,


You are very welcome. 😇

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

레벤테 (Levente)

Team KoreanClass101.com

robert groulx
Sunday at 12:28 AM
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thank you for the lesson


my favorite is 이등병: 네. 알겠습니다.


robert

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 11:22 PM
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Hello 하니,


Thanks for always working so hard! Let's take a look at what you wrote (just be mindful of the spacing):


몸이 아플 때는 회사 나 오면 안 돼요.

-->몸이 아플 때는 회사에 나오면 안 돼요.


Keep up the good work!

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

하니
Monday at 10:01 PM
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몸이 아플 때는 회사 나 오면 안 돼요.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 10:16 PM
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Hi Fiona,


Thank you for posting.


It seems the lesson notes pdf is working fine with this lesson.


Could you check if you have a free lifetime account? Those who have the free lifetime account can access only up to lesson 3 for free. If you have a basic or premium membership, please let us know which error message you see on the screen. It’d be great if you could send us an email at contactus@KoreanClass101.com so that we can take a look at the issue closely.


Thank you,

Cristiane

Team KoreanClass101.com

Fiona Jiji
Saturday at 03:16 PM
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안녕하세요. When I download it as PDF, it says it is corrupted. Yesterday I downloaded 20 PDF files and only 10 of them worked. Why is it like that? Thank you so much.

Koreanclass101.com Verified
Saturday at 03:59 AM
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Hello Colin,



Thank you for your follow-up and you might like to read over on what I have mentioned as in "ANSWER".


Whoever higher ranks call you to do something, then you go by yes, sir.


The reason why we put on 네, 알겠습니다 is most general and we cannot hold all occasions into one pdf file.


Some translations you may find may not seem direct as Korean and English are different and our way of expression may not exactly have something equivalent in another language.


Also for the "CALL or REFER", that is when you get to speak up on it instead of "ANSWER" what they ask you to do.


So when you receive, you go by "yes, sir".


However, when you give, you go by EXACT title.


My grand father was a general, my father was a captain, and my brother served as a stranger.


I think you could trust on my comment but if you rather trust the comments from your friend or whoever to be, you are more than welcome to do! :)





Thank you


Madison

Team Koreanclass101.com

Colin
Friday at 03:32 AM
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"In Korea, whoever is higher-ranked to you, you use ’sir’ to answer."


Okay, but the translation of "네. 알겠습니다" was "Yes, sir. I understand" or something to the likes of that. However, the Korean translation doesn't seem to have any equivalent of the word "Sir" in it. it just says "네".


"If you get to call someone or refer, then you have to go by exact title that they have!:)"


This confuses me a little because this directly contradicts the preceding statement. If you refer to or call for someone by their EXACT title, as you say, then wouldn't it be "corporal, sergeant, warrant, master warrant, chief warrant etc. or for officers, lieutenant, major, colonel, etc. (these officers in normal circumstances would be called sir/madam in any subsequent exchanges)?


It's confusing, because a corporal is unbecoming of the respect of a "sir", and it's the first I've heard of it despite those I know who've served in ROKA .

Koreanclass101.com Verified
Friday at 03:12 AM
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Hello Colin,



Thank you for your note and we appreciate your opinion.


This is what is slightly different from whatsoever force, army or navy that you country is having.


In Korea, whoever is higher-ranked to you, you use 'sir' to answer.


If you get to call someone or refer, then you have to go by exact title that they have!:)


Hope it answers your curiosity!;)




Thank you


Madison

Team Koreanclass101.com

Colin
Thursday at 03:44 AM
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Actually, in English, a Private would never call a corporal a "Sir/Madam", as it is translated in the PDF notes. Only commissioned officers would be called "Sir/Madam". The only non-commissioned, regular ranked members that are called "Sir" or "Madam" are warrant officers and above. A private would simply called a corporal "corporal" and a sergeant "sergeant". I'm pretty sure this would be the same in Korean as well, and a private would be scolded by superiors for improperly address other NCMs as sirs and madams.