Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

안녕하세요 여러분. Koreanclass101.com 하나하나 한글시리즈의 에이미입니다. Hi everybody! I’m Amy and welcome to Hana Hana Hangul on KoreanClass101.com - The fastest, easiest, and most fun way to learn Hangul, the Korean alphabet.
In the last lesson, we looked at double consonants in the bat-chim position. In this lesson, we’re going to return to vowels.
Yes, you already know all the vowels. But this time, we’re going to talk about combining vowels to make more complex sounds.
We will look at four combinations today, all of which have the vowel ㅣ in them.
Remember the first two characters you learned back in lesson one? We’ll combine them first. ㅏ plus ㅣ makes ㅐ.
Listen closely to this pronunciation
[alternating male/female pronunciation]
Here’s an important word that uses this vowel. 내일. It means tomorrow.
Here is a short sentence that we made back in lesson 5. 휴가 가요. Do you remember the meaning? It’s “I’m going on vacation.”
Let’s add “tomorrow” to this sentence.
내일 휴가 가요. “I am going to travel tomorrow.”
The next vowels we will combine are ㅓ and ㅣ. They make the sound... ㅔ.
[alternating male/female pronunciation]
What’s the difference between this sound and the last one? Nothing! While these two vowels had distinct sounds in the past, these days they’re pronounced basically the same. You can’t interchange them, but at least you don’t have to remember another vowel sound.
Try to read this word. 세 살. It means “three years old.”
Here’s that word in a sample sentence: 아이가 세 살이에요. The baby is three years old.
The next double vowel is a sound that is almost as easy to remember as the last one. Take ㅐ and add a small stroke and we get ㅒ.
[alternating male/female pronunciation]
Remember, a second small stroke gives it a Y sound.
얘기 means “talk” or “conversation”
얘기했어요 means “I have a conversation.”
The last vowel today is an easy one, too. ㅕ and ㅣ make ㅖ.
[alternating male/female pronunciation]
These two characters also have the same sound, but remember that they can’t be used interchangeably.
예약 means “reservation”
호텔 예약을 하다 means “I made a reservation for the hotel”
Okay! Four vowels, two sounds. Not too bad, right? In this lesson we introduced double vowels. In the next lesson, we’ll finish them up. See you on the next Hana Hana Hangul! 여러분 다음에 만나요!

31 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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Do you know what's the most popular double consonant in Korean?

Prudence
Friday at 06:26 PM
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How should i know when to use ㅒorㅖ, ㅐorㅔsince they sound the same?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 09:51 AM
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Hi Devi,


Thank you for posting. Pronunciation rules exist to make pronunciation easier--batchim rules exist for this very reason. It is not just in Korean however, for example, in English, why is 'k' there in 'know' but not pronounced? Why do you pronounce 'know' as 'no' but not write it as such? Why do you use 'y' instead of 'I' in really when it is pronounced as realli? Just like these, some rules you need to accept as it was implemented to make it easier for users (although I know, it can get difficult).


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Devi
Saturday at 11:23 AM
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I imagined it to be different between reading and writing hangul. I guess all you've explained in these lessons are the way we read korean hangul, but what about writing them? When do we use particular character over the others, which when we read it, got replaced by other sound? Thank you

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 05:19 AM
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Hi Lina,


Thanks for posting, we're glad our lesson was of help!


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Park Lina
Thursday at 03:00 AM
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I very much enjoyed studying Korean

I was having trouble remembering how to pronounce these letters

Now much easier than I thought

Thank you I have benefited a lot

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 12:35 AM
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Hi sanara,


Thanks for commenting. I'm sorry that you are having trouble remembering things. One of the best methods is to review as much as possible until you feel that you've gotten it down, and another may be to continuously read the words out loud until you get the pronunciation down.


Hope this helps somewhat.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

sanara sahanmie desilva
Wednesday at 06:32 PM
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although I try really hard at remembering those sounds and rules and everything.. i still can't remember them and read words...when i read a word it takes a long time to process...what can I do??? please help>>😭😭😭😭

KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 02:53 AM
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Hi Mart,


Thanks for posting.

''내일(tomorrow) 휴가(vacation/holiday) 가요(go)'' translates to '(The speaker) is going on holiday'.

If you want to say that tomorrow is a holiday, you would write:

내일은 휴일입니다. (This is a Sino Korean word with the meaning breaking down to휴=rest 일=day).=Tomorrow is a holiday.


가요 is an informal formal way to say 'going'. So it cannot be translated to 'Tomorrow is a holiday'.

Hope this was of help!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Mart
Saturday at 10:43 PM
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Dear Lyn,


When i translate the sentence ''내일 휴가 가요'' it gives the translation: ''tomorrow is a holiday''

You say it is ''i'm going on a holiday''. How can i ever know, also for future sentences, when it is a correct korean sentece when everyone says it means something different?

Thanks a lot

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 11:04 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Sahara,


Thank you for commenting. If you would like to get the basics of Hangul reading/writing down first, the lesson series you are working on right now (Hana Hana Hangul) will help, please review it many times until you get the vowels and consonants down. Here is another lesson series that may be of help:


https://www.koreanclass101.com/2007/10/02/video-1-how-to-read-and-write-hangul/

(the first two lessons are free!)


What you may also want to do is print out a chart of vowels/consonants, and tape it to your refrigerator so that you can access it many times a day. Many native Koreans will have a chart on the wall for their children so that they can look at it everyday and remember the vowels and consonants.

Also, to increase your vocabulary, you may want to take a look at the 'core 100' word list. Writing the words down on flashcards and carrying them with you may be one way to increase your vocabulary. ?


Hope this was of help.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com