Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Safe & Secure. We respect your privacy
Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Safe & Secure. We respect your privacy
Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky:
Hi everyone, and welcome back to KoreanClass101.com. This is Business Korean for Beginners, Season 1 Lesson 11 - Greeting Your Boss on the First Day of the Korean New Year. Becky here.
Kyejin:
Hello, I'm Kyejin. 안녕하세요. 김계진입니다.
Becky:
In this lesson, you’ll learn how to greet someone when you see them at the beginning of the new year. The conversation takes place in an office.
Kyejin:
It's between Linda and her boss, Mr. Park.
Becky:
The speakers are in a boss-subordinate relationship, so the subordinate will be using formal South Korean, and the boss will not. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

Linda:
과장님. 설 연휴는 잘 보내셨어요?
Park:
차가 많이 막혀서 혼났어. 린다 씨는?
Linda:
저는 이번 설은 서울에 있었어요. 신정 때 고향에 다녀왔어요.
Park:
그렇구나. 새해 복 많이 받아.
Linda:
네. 과장님도 새해 복 많이 받으세요.
Becky:
Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Linda:
과장님. 설 연휴는 잘 보내셨어요?
Park:
차가 많이 막혀서 혼났어. 린다 씨는?
Linda:
저는 이번 설은 서울에 있었어요. 신정 때 고향에 다녀왔어요.
Park:
그렇구나. 새해 복 많이 받아.
Linda:
네. 과장님도 새해 복 많이 받으세요.
Becky:
Now listen to the conversation with the English translation.
Linda:
Mr. Park, how was your new year holiday?
Park:
I had a hard time because of the heavy traffic jams. What about you, Linda?
Linda:
I stayed in Seoul for the lunar new year. I went to my hometown during the solar calendar new year holiday.
Park:
I see. Happy new year!
Linda:
Thank you. Happy new year to you too, Mr. Park.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky:
Kyejin, I think some of our listeners are confused about the differences between the two New Year holidays.
Kyejin:
You mean, 구정 and 신정, right?
Becky:
Exactly. Which one do Korean people consider more important?
Kyejin:
I would say.. 구정 which is the New Year holiday based on the lunar calendar. It’s considered more traditional than the other one, 신정, which is based on the solar calendar.
Becky:
So usually family get-togethers take place during the traditional new year holiday, right?
Kyejin:
That’s true, but lately it seems fewer and fewer people are visiting their hometown during 구정, because of the heavy traffic jams from Seoul to other cities. Instead, more and more people are visiting their family on 신정, the New Year holiday on the solar calendar, or other weekends.
Becky:
I see. I heard that sometimes, parents visit their sons’ or daughters’ houses instead.
Kyejin:
That’s right. We call the trend 역귀성 which means “Reversed homecoming.” As it takes too much time to go from Seoul to other cities, the parents take a trip to Seoul instead.
Becky:
That sounds interesting. Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Becky:
Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Kyejin:
설 [natural native speed]
Becky:
New Year's Day (shortened form of 설날)
Kyejin:
설 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin:
설 [natural native speed]
Next:
Kyejin:
연휴 [natural native speed]
Becky:
consecutive holidays
Kyejin:
연휴 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin:
연휴 [natural native speed]
Next:
Kyejin:
보내다 [natural native speed]
Becky:
to spend
Kyejin:
보내다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin:
보내다 [natural native speed]
Next:
Kyejin:
막히다 [natural native speed]
Becky:
to be clogged, to be blocked with traffic
Kyejin:
막히다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin:
막히다 [natural native speed]
Next:
Kyejin:
혼나다 [natural native speed]
Becky:
to be scolded, to have a hard time (an idiom)
Kyejin:
혼나다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin:
혼나다 [natural native speed]
Next:
Kyejin:
신정 [natural native speed]
Becky:
New Year's Day on the the solar calendar
Kyejin:
신정 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin:
신정 [natural native speed]
Next:
Kyejin:
고향 [natural native speed]
Becky:
hometown
Kyejin:
고향 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin:
고향 [natural native speed]
Lastly:
Kyejin:
다녀오다 [natural native speed]
Becky:
to visit, to go to and come back from
Kyejin:
다녀오다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin:
다녀오다 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky:
Let's have a closer look at some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Kyejin:
혼났어.
Becky:
which means “I was in trouble” but it literally means “I was scolded.”
Kyejin:
Usually you can use this verb to mean “I was scolded.” as in 유리창을 깨서 혼났어.
Becky:
“I was scolded because I broke the window.”
Kyejin:
However, you can use this verb idiomatically to mean “I was in big trouble.” or “I had a hard time.”
Becky:
In the dialogue, Mr.Park used the verb to mean “I had a hard time because of the heavy traffic jams.”
Kyejin:
That’s right. He said 차가 많이 막혀서 혼났어. Here, 차가 많이 막히다 means “to have a heavy traffic jam” or literally “cars are blocked a lot.”
Becky:
In a business situation, this idiomatic expression is used quite often, right?
Kyejin:
That’s right. For example.. 일이 너무 많아서 혼났어.
Becky:
“I had a hard time because I had too much work to do.”
Kyejin:
Or.. 긴장해서 혼났어요.
Becky:
“I had a hard time because I was nervous.” Sometimes, this expression can be used to be humble.
Kyejin:
That’s right. Even if you gave a great presentation, you can say 긴장해서 혼났어요..
Becky:
“I had a hard time because I was nervous.”
Kyejin:
... when someone asks you how the presentation was.
Becky:
Okay, what’s the next word?
Kyejin:
고향
Becky:
“hometown.” I've heard this word before when someone asked me where I’m from.
Kyejin:
Right. Sometimes Korean people ask 고향이 어디에요? to mean “where are you from?”
Becky:
It literally means “Where is your hometown?”
Kyejin:
You can answer the question with the name of the city or country where you were born.
Becky:
For me, Cincinnati.
Kyejin:
Okay, then if someone asks you.. 고향이 어디에요?
Becky:
“Where is your hometown?”
Kyejin:
You can answer by saying.. 신시내티입니다.
Becky:
“It’s Cincinnati” or “My hometown is Cincinnati.” What if I spent most of my time in a different city?
Kyejin:
In that case, say the name of the city where you were born, and add extra lines. For example.. 고향은 신시내티인데, 뉴욕에서 자랐습니다.
Becky:
“My hometown is Cincinnati, but I grew up in New York.” Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Becky:
In this lesson, you’ll learn some useful expressions for the first working day after the New Year's holiday.
Kyejin:
In Korea, you’ll have two new year holidays a year, so these expressions can be more useful than in other languages.
Becky:
What’s the first expression, Kyejin?
Kyejin:
The general greeting - 새해 복 많이 받으세요.
Becky:
“Happy New Year.”
Kyejin:
We’re introducing this expression again, as it’s a very important phrase to say.
Becky:
When you see someone on the first working day after the New Year’s holidays, say this expression instead of saying “Hello.”
Kyejin:
That’s a good tip. You can even end an email with this expression.
Becky:
But for a very formal situation, we need to use a different sentence ending, right?
Kyejin:
That’s right. Instead of saying 새해 복 받으세요 with 요 at the end, it’s better to say 새해 복 많이 받으십시오. with the 십시오 at the end. The sentence-ending particle 오 is used mostly in written Korean, because it sounds so formal.
Becky:
But it seems like people use different expressions a lot too.
Kyejin:
That’s right. I think the second most common expression is 새해엔 부자 되세요.
Becky:
“Be rich in the new year.”
Kyejin:
People began saying the phrase 부자 되세요 after it was used in a popular TV commercial. Traditionally, people didn’t say this kind of direct expression, but these days, 부자 되세요 is used a lot when exchanging New Year’s messages.
Becky:
Can we hear it again?
Kyejin:
새해엔 부자 되세요.
Becky:
What other expressions do people say?
Kyejin:
Especially after 구정, the traditional New Year celebration, people will ask you what you did during the holiday. The holiday usually lasts for three or four days, so most people go to their hometown to see their parents. In that case, you can say.. 고향에 다녀 왔어요.
Becky:
“I went to my hometown.”
Kyejin:
Or you can say. 부모님 댁에 다녀 왔어요.
Becky:
“I went to my parents’ house.”
Kyejin:
And if you don’t have any family in South Korea, you might spend the holiday alone. In that case, you can say.. 집에 있었어요.
Becky:
“I stayed at home.”
Kyejin:
Or some might say.. 일본에 다녀왔어요.
Becky:
“I took a trip to Japan.”
Kyejin:
In these sample sentences, I used the verb 다녀오다 which means “to go and come back.” That’s because it sounds softer than the verb 갔다 오다 which also means “to go and come back.”

Outro

Becky:
Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kyejin:
다음 시간에 만나요!

5 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 6:30 pm
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

What did you do for the last new year season?

Thursday at 3:20 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Colin and Jim,

We’re sorry for the inconvenience, We’ve fixed the issues with the PDF lesson notes.

Thank you for your patience,
Jae
Team KoreanClass101.com

Colin
Monday at 1:29 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

There seems to be something wrong with the examples on page 5 of the PDF notes. It seems like they are incomplete.

KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 12:07 pm
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jim,

Thanks for posting. We’ll get back to you soon.

Best,
Lyn
Team KoreanClass101.com

Jim Stanfill
Thursday at 12:44 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Looks like the Lesson Notes PDF has some content missing, and also for the next lesson #12.