Dialogue

Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Seol: 안녕하세요. 윤설입니다.
Keith: Keith here! Telling Time. Yun Seol, it’s been a while. Glad to have you back.
Seol: Yeah.
Keith: You’re happy to be here?
Seol: Yes.
Keith: Good. Well, when’s the last time you’ve been here?
Seol: A week ago.
Keith: A week ago. Well, we’re going to be talking about time but not in that sense. We’re going to be talking about telling time. Okay. Our conversation has taken place at a train station. These are two people who have just missed the train and now they’re waiting for the next one, all right? So let’s listen in.

Lesson conversation

제영 지금 몇 시예요?
하나 지금 두 시예요
제영 지금 몇 시예요?
하나 세 시예요
제영 지금 몇 시예요?
하나 네 시예요
제영 지금 몇 시예요?
하나 아, 진짜....
Seol: 한 번 더 천천히.
제영 지금 몇 시예요?
하나 지금 두 시예요
제영 지금 몇 시예요?
하나 세 시예요
제영 지금 몇 시예요?
하나 네 시예요
제영 지금 몇 시예요?
하나 아, 진짜....
Seol: 영어로 한 번 더.
제영 지금 몇 시예요?
Keith: What time is it now?
하나 지금 두 시예요
Keith: It's 3:00 o'clock now.
제영 지금 몇 시예요?
Keith: What time is it now?
하나 세 시예요
Keith: It's 4:00 o'clock.
제영 지금 몇 시예요?
Keith: What time is it now?
하나 아 진짜..
Keith: Oh, come on.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Keith: Seol, what did you think about the conversation?
Seol: Maybe 제영 does not have a watch.
Keith: Okay, you’re probably right. He was asking for the time. So as you can tell, today’s lesson was about telling time. Let’s just right into it. So Korean has two systems in numbers, and we use native Korean numbers for the hour and Sino Korean numbers for the minutes. And we went over the Sino Korean numbers in our telephone lesson. To review those numbers, we’ll just over really quickly. Seol, can you please give us 1 through 10?
Seol: 일 이 삼 사 오 육 칠 팔 구 십
Keith: Okay, that was 1 to 10. And we only need to know numbers 1 through 10 to make numbers 1 through 99. So if you need to, please go back and review the numbers. All right. Today, we’ll be introducing native Korean numbers. Now Seol, do you know anything about the history of these numbers?
Seol: I’m sometimes so surprised that you are so brilliant. You know a lot about Korean.
Keith: Okay. Well, these numbers are basically natively Korean. They haven’t been influenced by other languages.
Seol: So you don’t know the history of these numbers?
Keith: No, they’re just Korean.
Seol: Okay.
Keith: They’re just Korean, pure Korean. Actually that’s the Korean word, right?
Seol: Yes.
Keith: These are pure Korean.
Seol: Yes.
Keith: Not native Korean. So these are pure Korean words, not influenced by the outside. So, on the clock, the hours are from 1 to 12.
VOCAB LIST
Seol, can you please give that to us? One (Native Korean).
Seol: 하나 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 하나 [natural native speed].
Keith: Two (Native Korean)
Seol: 둘 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 둘 [natural native speed].
Keith: Three (Native Korean)
Seol: 셋 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 셋 [natural native speed].
Keith: Four (Native Korean).
Seol: 넷 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 넷 [natural native speed].
Keith: Five (Native Korean).
Seol: 다섯 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 다섯 [natural native speed].
Keith: Six (Native Korean).
Seol: 여섯 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 여섯 [natural native speed].
Keith: Seven (Native Korean).
Seol: 일곱 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 일곱 [natural native speed].
Keith: Eight (Native Korean)
Seol: 여덟 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 여덟 [natural native speed].
Keith: Nine (Native Korean)
Seol: 아홉 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 아홉 [natural native speed].
Keith: Ten (Native Korean).
Seol: 열 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 열 [natural native speed].
Keith: Eleven.
Seol: 열하나 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 열하나 [natural native speed].
Keith: Twelve
Seol: 열둘 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 열둘[natural native speed].

Lesson focus

Keith: Okay. So we have numbers 1 through 12, but now we got to say the time. Seol, how do you say 1:00 o’clock?
Seol: 한시
Keith: Wait, but didn’t you say one was 하나?
Seol: I did, but here we say 한 시.
Keith: That’s right. The number 1 하나 changes when something is attached to the end of it. So this can be one person, one country, one anything, one paper. It changes to 한 when something is attached to the end of it. So when do you use just 하나.
Seol: When you are counting numbers.
Keith: And that’s it?
Seol: That’s it. I think that’s it.
Keith: I think? Okay. Well, if we find anything else, well we’ll be sure to let you know. And one 하나 changes to 한. This happens with a couple of other numbers, too. Isn’t that true?
Seol: It’s true.
Keith: So let’s go through the numbers that change. Here, 시 means hour, and here it’s 한 시.“one hour.” This means “one o’clock.” Next, how do we say 2:00 o’clock?
Seol: 두 시.
Keith: Okay. Seol, you’re tricking me again. Last time you said two was 둘.
Seol: Yeah.
Keith: But here you said….
Seol: 두..
Keith: It’s a very, very slight change at the end. Can you give us two when you’re counting?
Seol: 둘.
Keith: And how do you say “two” when something is attached to the end of it?
Seol: 두.
Keith: Okay. One more time side by side, please.
Seol: 둘, 두.
Keith: Okay. So here, because we have 시 which is “hour”, added on to the end it changes. Once again, it’s 두 시. “two hour”. It means two o’clock. Next we have…
Seol: 세 시.
Keith: Okay. This is one changes again at the end. Can you give the original?
Seol: 셋
Keith: And what does it change to?
Seol: 세
Keith: Okay. One more time side by side, please.
Seol: 셋, 세.
Keith: Okay. And this is 세시. “three hour, 3:00 o’clock”, the last one that changes. Well, almost last one.
Seol: 넷.
Keith: Okay, that’s number four. And what does it change to?
Seol: 네.
Keith: Okay. So what’s 4:00 o’clock?
Seol: 네 시.
Keith: Four hour, 4:00 o’clock.” And the rest of the numbers, they stay the same. So let’s go over 1:00 o’clock to 10:00 o’clock. One o’clock.
Seol: 한 시.
Keith: Two o’clock.
Seol: 두 시.
Keith: Three o’clock.
Seol: 세 시.
Keith: Four o’clock.
Seol: 네 시.
Keith: And here on, it’s the original number. There’s no phonetic change here, so all you have to do is know the number and say 시 or “hour” and there you go, you got o’clock. Five o’clock.
Seol: 다섯 시.
Keith: Six o’clock.
Seol: 여섯 시.
Keith: Seven o’clock.
Seol: 일곱 시.
Keith: Eight o’clock.
Seol: 여덟 시.
Keith: Nine o’clock.
Seol: 아홉 시.
Keith: Ten o’clock.
Seol: 열 시.
Keith: Eleven o’clock.
Seol: 열한 시.
Keith: And twelve o’clock is….
Seol: 열두 시.
Keith: Once again, 11;00 and 12:00 change because 시 is added on to the end. It’s the same as 1:00 o’clock and 2:00 o’clock, except you’re just putting 10:00 in front. Now you got 11:00 o’clock, 12:00 o’clock. Very simple. Now the Sino Korean numbers, which aren’t the numbers we’re going over today, has a very easy system where all you need to know is numbers one through ten to make numbers one through ninety-nine. But here with the native Korean number, numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, all the way to 90, they all have different names. So Seol, can you give us 10?
Seol: 열.
Keith: Twenty (Native Korean)
Seol: 스물
Keith: Thirty (Native Korean)
Seol: 서른
Keith: Forty (Native Korean)
Seol: 마흔
Keith: See, I see you and you’re looking at the script.
Seol: Yeah. For me, it’s really hard.
Keith: Yeah. Why is that?
Seol: I don’t usually use the native Korean system numbers. Like when you are saying your age, you use this system, but except for telling the time and age, this is not that common.
Keith: And when you’re counting things, right, like one, two, three, four, five.
Seol: Because I’m young. You know, young generation use Sino Korean numbers because they are easier.
Keith: Yes. And that’s a very good point that we’re trying to make today. Even Korean, native Korean speakers, they don’t know numbers, what, maybe 40, 50, 60…
Seol: They know; they just don’t use.
Keith: They don’t use it.
Seol: Not really. Not common.
Keith: Okay. So don’t look at the script. What’s number 90?
Seol: Okay, I admit, this is not common at all.
Keith: Yeah. Okay. So to be perfect honest with you, you only really need maybe numbers one through thirty.
Seol: Yeah.
Keith: Around there, right? And the rest of the numbers, just stick with the Sino Korean numbers. Much easier. Okay, the last line in our conversation was, just to go over real quick, it’s 아, 진짜. Literally it’s ah.. really, but here it has a nuance of “Oh, come on! Come on, give me a break!” Literally it means “Really?” And you can translate this as “Are you for real? Are you kidding me?” That kind of thing.

Outro

Keith: All right. Okay. That’s going to do it for todaySee you later!
Seol: 안녕!

Grammar

Korean Grammar Made Easy - Unlock This Lesson’s Grammar Guide

Easily master this lesson’s grammar points with in-depth explanations and examples. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

89 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

That last line is great to show your dissatisfaction or annoyance with someone... "아 진짜..." (a jinjja...) ;)

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 07:30 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

안녕하세요 robert groulx,


You are very welcome. 😇

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

레벤테 (Levente)

Team KoreanClass101.com

robert groulx
Wednesday at 06:43 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

thank you for the lesson


my favorite phrase is 하나 세 시예요


robert

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:53 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

안녕하세요 Mareike,


Great to hear that! 😇 Thank you very much for your message.

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

Good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

레벤테 (Levente)

Team KoreanClass101.com

Mareike
Sunday at 01:44 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Levente,

sorry für not answering.

I tried it with a different PC and there it worked. I don' t know why it doesn't work with mine anymore...

But I can listen to the audio at my smartphone, so everything is o.k. 🙂


Thanks a lot for checking and answering!

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 06:04 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Mareike,


Could you please try downloading the audio file and listening to that?

Do you also experience this when doing so?

I have just checked and there is no such error with the audio file on our side.

Could you kindly recheck?


Thank you!


Levente

Team KoreanClass101.com

Mareike
Monday at 04:14 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello,

could you check the audio lesson, please? After the music it´s silent for minutes and then starts in the middle of the conversation.It´s in this lesson and at least also in the next one.

Thanks a lot!

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 06:13 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Aia,


Thanks for posting. Let's take a look at what you wrote:


그는 여자가 짜증나게 했어요

-->그는 그녀를 짜증나게 했어요.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Aia
Friday at 05:48 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

그는 여자가 짜증나게 했어요

KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 08:40 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hello 임,


Thanks for posting. To take a look at what you wrote:


지금 네 시좀이에요

-->네 시 쯤 됐어요. -->(it is approximately 4 o'clock).


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Saturday at 06:11 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

지금 네 시좀이에요