Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Debbie: Counting Part II: Pure-Korean Numbers
Tim: 안녕하세요 여러분, “Hello everyone,” This is Tim. Welcome back to Basic Bootcamp. I am joined in the studio by 두두두…
Debbie: “Debbie!” Hello everyone, Debbie here. Tim, is today’s lesson the last lesson for the Basic Bootcamp series?
Tim: Yes! Congratulations, you guys! You've made it through all five Basic Bootcamp lessons.
Debbie: Yes, we want to say Thank you for all your interest, support and dedication to Korean. Okay, let’s talk about today’s lesson. What are we learning in this lesson?
Tim: Debbie, do you remember what we learned in the last lesson?
Debbie: Yes, we learned about “numbers”.
Tim: What kind of numbers?
Debbie: Ah~~ “Sino-Korean Numbers!” which is pretty much based on Chinese numerals.
Tim: That's right! In the last lesson, we learned about “Sino-Korean Numbers” and today, we are going to learn about “Pure-Korean Numbers”.
Debbie: Pure-Korean Numbers?
Tim: Yes, we use “Pure-Korean Numbers” for counting and reciting people, items, and many more.
Debbie: And for further details such as multiples of 10 and up to 100, please take a look at the lesson notes.
Tim: In today’s lesson, Tim is doing grocery shopping and he is counting apples. Let’s listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
하나
다섯
여섯
일곱
여덟
아홉
스물
Debbie: Let’s listen to the conversation one time slowly.
Tim: 천천히 한국어로 대화를 들어보겠습니다.
하나
다섯
여섯
일곱
여덟
아홉
스물
Debbie: Now with the translation.
Tim: 자 이번엔 영어번역과 함께 들어볼까요?
Tim: 하나
Debbie: “one”
Tim: 둘
Debbie: “two”
Tim: 셋
Debbie: “three”
Tim: 넷
Debbie: “four”
Tim: 다섯
Debbie: “five”
Tim: 여섯
Debbie: “six”
Tim: 일곱
Debbie: “seven”
Tim: 여덟
Debbie: “eight”
Tim: 아홉
Debbie: “nine”
Tim: 열
Debbie: “ten”
Tim: 스물
Debbie: “twenty”

Lesson focus

Debbie: So, are we learning how to count ""Pure-Korean Numbers""
Tim: Yes!
Debbie: Okay first, listen to 1 through 10. Tim will say it in Korean and I will say it in English. Tim, are you ready?
Tim: Yes, here we go, 하나
Debbie: “one”
Tim: 둘
Debbie: “two”
Tim: 셋
Debbie: “three”
Tim: 넷
Debbie: “four”
Tim: 다섯
Debbie: “five”
Tim: 여섯
Debbie: “six”
Tim: 일곱
Debbie: “seven”
Tim: 여덟
Debbie: “eight”
Tim: 아홉
Debbie: “nine”
Tim: 열
Debbie: “ten”. Tim, “from 1 to 10” in Pure-Korean Numbers please…
Tim: 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯, 여섯, 일곱, 여덟, 아홉, 열.
Debbie: Okay, listeners. This time, Tim is going to separate them into 5 groups, 1 and 2, 3 and 4, 5 and 6, 7 and 8, 9 and 10. Please repeat after Tim.
Tim: 하나, 둘
Tim: 셋, 넷
Tim: 다섯, 여섯
Tim: 일곱, 여덟
Tim: 아홉, 열
Debbie: Great! Now let’s try counting from 1 to 10 without pausing in between each number! Please repeat after Tim in a louder voice…
Tim: 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯, 여섯, 일곱, 여덟, 아홉, 열
[pause 4 sec]
Debbie: Excellent! This time, let’s practice counting 'from 11 to 20'.
Tim: First, let’s simply take a look at how to put those numbers together.
Debbie: Yup! Just like “Sino-Korean Numbers”, counting ‘from 11 to 20’ in Pure-Korean Numbers is also very easy after memorizing ‘1 to 10’.
Tim: Yes, for example, “eleven” is 열 “ten” + 하나 “one”, so, 열 하나 is“eleven”
Debbie: “Twelve” is 열 “ten” + 둘 “two”, therefore, 열 둘 is“twelve”. Just keep counting like that.
Tim: Okay, let’s practice it with listeners. “eleven” is “ten” 열 + “one” 하나, 열 하나. Repeat after me, 열 하나.
Debbie: “twelve” is “ten” 열 + “two” 둘, 열 둘.
Tim: “thirteen” is “ten” 열 + “three” 셋, 열 셋.
Debbie: “Fourteen” is “ten” 열 + “four” 넷, 열 넷.
Tim: “Fifteen” is “ten” 열 + “five” 다섯, 열 다섯.
Debbie: “Sixteen’ is “ten” 열 + “six” 여섯, 열 여섯.
Tim: “Seventeen” is “ten” 열 + “seven” 일곱, 열 일곱.
Debbie: “Eighteen” is “ten” 열 + “eight” 여덟, 열 여덟.
Tim: “Nineteen” is ‘ten” 열 + “nine” 아홉, 열 아홉.
Debbie: “Twenty” is 스물. Repeat after me 스물.
Tim: So, all together from 11 to 20 is… 열 하나, 열 둘, 열 셋, 열 넷, 열 다섯, 열 여섯, 열 일곱, 열 여덟, 열 아홉, 스물.
Debbie: In this lesson, we're just going to go up to 20 for Pure-Korean numbers.
Tim: Counting over that can get quite difficult.
Debbie: Right, so you don’t need to know about those multiples of 10 in Pure-Korean Numbers for now. However, if you are interested, take a look at the Lesson Notes - they're all listed in there.
Tim: Yes.
VOCAB LIST
Debbie: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word is...
Tim: 하나 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “one” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 하나 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 하나 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Next we have
Tim: 둘 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “two” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 둘 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 둘 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Next we have
Tim: 셋 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “three” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 셋 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 셋 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Next we have
Tim: 넷 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “four” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 넷 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 넷 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Next we have
Tim: 다섯 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “five” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 다섯 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 다섯 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Next we have
Tim: 여섯 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “six” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 여섯 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 여섯 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Next we have
Tim: 일곱 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “seven” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 일곱 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 일곱 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Next we have
Tim: 여덟 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “eight” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 여덟 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 여덟 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Next we have
Tim: 아홉 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “nine” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 아홉 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 아홉 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Next we have
Tim: 열 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “ten” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 열 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열 [natural native speed]
Debbie: The last word is...
Tim: 스물 [natural native speed]
Debbie: “twenty” (Pure-Korean number)
Tim: 스물 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 스물 [natural native speed]

Outro

Debbie: Okay, well, guess what guys! That’s all for this lesson and Basic Bootcamp series.
Tim: Really?
Debbie: Yeah. We hope that you guys have enjoyed learning Basic Korean throughout this 5-part Basic Bootcamp series with us.
Tim: You guys just completed the first step to learning Korean. I am so proud of you guys!
Debbie: Yes, You guys are best!
Tim: 여러분들은 짱입니다!
Debbie: Thanks for listening and hope to see you in our other lessons.
Tim: 그럼 여러분, 화이팅! Good luck, until next time!

15 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hi Debbie & Tim. First of all thanks for the lesson! I have a question however, Do the Pure-korean numbers end at 99? And if so, why? I understand that 100 o'clock would make no sense, but having for example 100 apples (maybe something smaller like winegums) is a possibility. In short my question would be, how would you count in Pure Korean numbers over a 100? Do you go back to Sino numbers (백)? 감사합니다 안부 조디

KoreanClass101.com
Thursday at 11:12 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi artemis,


Thanks for posting. We get asked this question often, if you scroll down you will find the answer. But just in case here is one answer:


"Hi Janet,


Thank you for your comment.

Pure Korean numbers are used when you are counting something--people, items, age, etc. For example, if you want to say 'three apples', you would say '사과 세개', but '사과 삼개' would be incorrect.

However, pure-Korean numbers are used for 1-99, and from the number 100, sino-Korean numbers are used.

Sino numbers are mostly used for money, addresses, phone numbers, dates, and numbers above 100."


Best,

Lyn

TeamKoreanClass101.com

artemis riley
Friday at 02:13 AM
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how do you know when to use sino or pure korean numbers?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 09:43 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Anita,


Thanks for posting. There is no pure-Korean word for zero, the two Sino-Korean words for 'zero' are '영' and '공', just remember that in phone numbers you would use '공'. ('영' means 'zero but can also be used to express that something is 'nonexistent, nil, is nothing').


Sincerely,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Anita
Friday at 10:37 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

What is zero in the pure Korean numbers? I got it in the Sino-Korean numbers but we got twenty here instead. Is it that when you say zero it's only in the Sino-Korean and not the pure Korean?


Btw - I'm really enjoying these classes so far and using the flashcards.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 12:58 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Kavya,


Thank you for posting. We have some lessons on the rules of batchim in our 'Hana Hana Hangul' series which may help you in understanding the batchim rules:


https://www.koreanclass101.com/2012/04/20/hana-hana-hangul-11-hangul-batchim-1/ (lessons 11-16)


Hope this is of help. Please let us know if you have any other inquiries.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Kavya
Thursday at 08:53 PM
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여덟 - This word is pronounced as yeodeol. But, We have two consonants at the batchim position. I'm confused as to how that is possible and why it's pronounced as it is.

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 10:51 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Gina,


Thank you for posting. According to the Korean rules of 'batchim', when the consonants ㄷ, ㅅ, ㅈ, ㅊ, ㅌ and ㅎ are used as a batchim, they all take on the sound of the consonant 'ㄷ'.

That is why '셋' sounds like '섿'. However, when the batchim 'ㅅ' is followed by either the consonants 'ㄴ' or 'ㅁ', it would take on the 'ㄴ' sound. Here are some examples:


덧셈(sounds like 덛셈)

덧니(as it is followed by 'ㄴ' it would sound like '던니')

먼 곳만 (as the batchim 'ㅅ' is followed by the consonant 'ㅁ' , the pronunciation becomes '곤만').

On another note, you would not use the 'ㄷ' sound when 'ㅅ' comes in front of a word. (example: 사랑 would sound as is--sarang, not darang.)

So if you remember these four rules, you'll be able to remember when 'ㅅ' sounds like the consonant 'ㄷ'.


Hope this was of help, please let us know if you have any other questions.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Gina
Tuesday at 03:50 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

I noticed that sometimes ㅅ/s can be read as ㅌ/t (ex. 셋 is read and pronounced as "set" and not "ses," and not written as 셑). How I should know when to read ㅅ as t? Thank you!

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 05:48 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Janet,


Thank you for your comment.

Pure Korean numbers are used when you are counting something--people, items, age, etc. For example, if you want to say 'three apples', you would say '사과 세개', but '사과 삼개' would be incorrect.

However, pure-Korean numbers are used for 1-99, and from the number 100, sino-Korean numbers are used.

Sino numbers are mostly used for money, addresses, phone numbers, dates, and numbers above 100.


Best,

Lyn

TeamKoreanClass101.com

Janet Rhodes
Tuesday at 05:43 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Would appreciate a clearer explanation of when Sino-Korean numbers are used vs. native Korean numbers. Apparently they're both used, but in what situations? Kinda glossed over that in this lesson. Of course, it may be more fully explained later on . . .