Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

Tim: 방가 방가 여러분, “Hello Hello, everyone”, this is Tim.
Debbie: 안녕하세요 여러분, “Hello everyone”, Debbie here. Welcome to our first Basic Bootcamp Lesson. Tim, I heard that today we are going to go “camping”? Did I hear that right?
Tim: “Camping!?”Well, actually we are going to“Boot-camp!”
Debbie: “Boot-camp!??”It sounds like we are about to join the army and get ready for hard training or something…
Tim: It may sound like that, but... this is“Basic Boot-camp” for Korean!
Debbie: “Basic Boot-camp” for Korean?”
Tim: Yes! But first, what IS a boot camp?
Debbie: By definition, it’s a camp for training military recruits. But the way we use it refers to how we’re going to help our listeners learn the basics that are necessary for the beginners before we delve into the Korean language.
Tim: Great! That’s exactly what this Boot-camp series is for!
Debbie: Then, how many lessons are there in this Boot-camp series?
Tim: W@e have a total of 5 boot-camp lessons.
Debbie: Okay, then what are we going to be learning in today's first lesson?
Tim: In this lesson you will learn about "Basic Greetings". We'll start off by talking about the“two ways of greeting someone” in Korean.
Debbie: “Two ways!??”
Tim: Yes, a formal way and an informal way.
Debbie: Very interesting! Let’s go over the “formal way” first. This conversation is between two adults who don’t know each other.
Debbie: Let’s listen to the conversation!
(Jigen, authentic “Formal” background sound please @restaurant)
(“Formal” greeting)
Jin-Seok: 안녕하세요, 반갑습니다. 저는 진석 입니다.
Jin-Seok: “Hello, nice to meet you. I am Jin-seok.
Ji-Su: 안녕하세요, 저는 지수 입니다. 만나서 반갑습니다.
Ji-Su: “Hello, I am Ji-su”, “Nice to meet you.”
Debbie: So Tim, what do Korean people normally do when they meet for the first time? Do they shake hands? Or do they bow all the time?
Tim: Hmm… between two males, they bow first and shake hands later on as well. Between two females, or between one male and one female, they normally bow.
Debbie: So, bowing is a big part of the custom in Korea?
Tim: Yes, we bow all the time, whenever we say "hello" or "goodbye"...
Debbie: Got it. Listeners, keep in mind that bowing is a big part of Korean culture!
Debbie: Okay, it’s time to take a closer look at some of the phrases from the dialogue.
Tim: We have 안녕하세요, 반갑습니다 or 만나서 반갑습니다, and 저는 데비 입니다.
Debbie: Great! Yes, those three phrases are what we're going to learn about.
Tim: First, 안녕하세요.
Debbie: Meaning “Hello”. Can you slowly say it one more time?
Tim: 안. 녕. 하. 세. 요 – 안녕하세요 “Hello”. Listeners, please repeat after me. 안녕하세요.
[pause]
Debbie: Okay, next we have,
Tim: 만나서 반갑습니다.
Debbie: Meaning “Nice to meet you”. Can you say it one time slowly again?
Tim: 만. 나. 서. 반. 갑. 습. 니. 다 – 만나서 반갑습니다 “Nice to meet you”. Please repeat after me. 만나서 반갑습니다.
[pause]
Debbie: Can we simply say 반갑습니다. “Nice to meet you” only?
Tim: Yes! 반갑습니다 and 만나서 반갑습니다 both mean “nice to meet you”.
Debbie: Great! Last we have,
Tim: 저는 팀 입니다. 저는 데비 입니다.
Debbie: Meaning “I am Tim”, “I am Debbie.” It’s an expression that is used when introducing one’s name.
Tim: Yes Debbie, let’s simply learn it this way… 저는 “I” + your name + 입니다 “am”. For example, with my name, 저는 “I” + 팀 “Tim” + 입니다 “am” = 저는 팀 입니다 “I am Tim.” Debbie, you try it,
Debbie: Okay, 저는 “I” + 데비 “Debbie” + 입니다 “am” = 저는 데비 입니다 “I am Debbie.”
Tim: Good job, Debbie! Listeners, it’s your turn. Please repeat after me and say your name instead of my name. Ready?
Tim: 저는
[pause for a sec]
Tim: 팀 “say your name”
[pause for a sec]
Tim: 입니다
[pause]
Debbie: Therefore, all together, “I am Tim” is… please repeat after Tim and say your name instead of his name,
Tim: 저는 팀 입니다.
[pause for three sec]
Debbie: Excellent job! Let’s review all the three phrases. I will say the English and you guys repeat after Tim in Korean. Here we go, (강조하며) “Hello”
Tim: 안녕하세요.
[pause two sec]
Debbie: “Nice to meet you”
Tim: 반갑습니다.
[pause two sec]
Debbie: “I am Tim” and say your name instead of Tim’s,
Tim: 저는 팀 입니다.
[pause three sec]
Tim: Great! Now let’s listen to the “informal greeting” between two adults.
(Jigen, authentic “Informal” background sound please @ cafe)
(“Informal” greeting)
Jin-Seok: 안녕, 난 진석이야 넌?
Jin-Seok: “Hello, I am Jin-seok. You?”
Ji-Su: 안녕, 난 지수야. 만나서 반가워.
Ji-Su: “Hello, I am Ji-su. Nice to meet you.”
Debbie: How many phrases do we have to learn?
Tim: “Three”, It's the same as the “formal greetings”.
Debbie: Hmm… they are…
Tim: 안녕, 만나서 반가워, and 난 팀이야.
Debbie: Hmm… I see your point. We’ve just learned about the “formal” ways of saying “hello”, “nice to meet you” and “I am Tim”. Now…
Tim: Let’s learn the “informal” ways of saying those. First, 안녕.
Debbie: Meaning “Hello”. I see… 안녕하세요 becomes 안. 녕 – 안녕.
Tim: Listeners, please repeat after me, 안녕
[pause for a sec]
Debbie: Next we have,
Tim: 만나서 반가워.
Debbie: Meaning “Nice to meet you.” So 만나서 반갑습니다 becomes…
Tim: 만. 나. 서. 반. 가. 워 – 만나서 반가워. Please repeat after me, 만나서 반가워.
[pause for three sec]
Debbie: Last we have…
Tim: 난 팀이야.
Debbie: Meaning “I am Tim.” I see… 나는 팀 입니다 becomes 난 팀 이야.
Tim: Yes! 난 “I” is a shortened form of 나는.
Debbie: 이야 “am” is a shortened form of 입니다?
Tim: Yes! Therefore, with my name “I am Tim” is 난 팀 이야. How about you, Debbie?
Debbie: “I am Debbie” is 난 데비 (이)야. Okay, listeners….This time, let’s review all six phrases. I will say the English and Tim will say both “formal” and “informal” Korean for each one. Here we go, (강조하며) “Hello”
Tim: Formal, 안녕하세요, Informal, 안녕.
Debbie: “Nice to meet you”
Tim: Formal, 만나서 반갑습니다, Informal, 만나서 반가워.
Debbie: “I am Tim".
Tim: Formal, 저는 팀 입니다, Informal, 난 팀 이야.
Debbie: Great! That's all six of them! Well, that’s all for today’s boot camp!
Tim: How did your first Korean boot camp lesson go?
Debbie: I hope we didn’t push you too much and I hope that you guys had a lot of fun with us.
Tim: I am sure they did!
Debbie: Thanks for listening and join us next time as we learn more about the basics!
Tim: 그럼 다음 시간에 만나요. Bye everyone!
Debbie: See you next time.

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Question, if two adults who are acquaintances already know each other and are meeting in an informal setting, why would they say "nice to meet you"? If they already know each other, do they still have to say this?

KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 4:09 am
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Hi Faith,


Thanks for posting.

'반가워요' is an informal formal (not the utmost polite way of saying 'nice to meet you' but still, polite) way of saying 'nice to meet you'.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Faith
Tuesday at 5:22 pm
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And if you put bangawoyo is it a formal or is that correct?

KoreanClass101.com
Wednesday at 9:18 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hihi Camillia,


Thanks for commenting. You did a good job! Just remember that 'imnida' cannot be used alone and needs to be attached to the preceding word (in this case, your name).


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Camillia
Tuesday at 8:46 am
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Hi, I wanted to know if If this was correct


제 아름은 카밀리아 입니다.

KoreanClass101.com
Sunday at 6:20 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Em Rjey!


Thank you for your posting!

Your Hangul name would be [엠(em) 레이(re-yi)].

So, '제 이름은 엠레이입니다.' would be correct.

Hope this helps you.

Thanks!


Best,

Jiye

Team KoreanClass101.com

KoreanClass101.com
Thursday at 10:03 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Edwin,


Thanks for posting. Even if one knows the other person, you would say, 'Hey, nice running into you!/Nice to see you again!' in English, right? 반가워요 is also used in that context.

Also, you could have met the other person before, but may not remember their name, in that case, you would introduce your name one more time.


Hope this answered your questions.


Cheers,

Lyn

KoreanClass101.com



Em Rjey ....
Wednesday at 10:16 pm
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저 이름은 엠래입니다..

my name is Em Rjey..


did i type it right??

Edwin
Monday at 11:09 am
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"Question, if two adults who are acquaintances already know each other and are meeting in an informal setting, why would they say "nice to meet you"? If they already know each other, do they still have to say this?"


Has this been answered? I was really curious about this when going through the lesson.

Also found it hard to think of a scenario where I am acquaintances with someone and I would be informally giving my name. If I am acquainted, then they would know my name. If I haven't introduced myself, then wouldn't I still present myself using the formal method?


Cheers!

KoreanClass101.com
Wednesday at 6:19 am
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Jemmy,


Thanks for posting. This is the polite way to introduce yourself (thus the safest, you don't want to talk down to someone who is senior than you!). It is:


제 이름은 제미예요.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 12:23 am
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Hi Alexia,


Thank you for posting. When the name ends with a vowel, you will use '야'. When it ends with a consonant you will use '이야'.

Having said that, as your name ends with a vowel (알렉시아), you would use '야' , and it would become 알렉시아야.



Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com