Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Tim: Hello everyone! I'm Tim, and welcome to KoreanPOD101.
Debbie: With us, you'll learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Tim: We also provide you with cultural insights...
Debbie: ...and tips you won't find in a textbook.
Tim: Hello everyone and welcome back to KoreanClass101.com. I am joined here by Debbie "빰빠라 빰~~!"
Debbie: 하하 팀! You seem really happy today! By the way, many listeners have asked so many questions and left positive comments in KoreanClass101.com. So we would like to thank them. "Thank you guys~~"
Tim: Yes, Debbie! Their passion for learning Korean is so intense that we have to work harder than ever before!
Debbie: That's a good thing!
Tim: Okay. Let's talk about today's lesson. What are we learning today?
Debbie: Today we are going to learn about a very basic and simple "How" question, which is 어때요 in Korean.
Tim: Yes. Korean people often politely ask about feelings and opinions by simply saying, noun + 어때요? "How is the noun?"
Debbie: We will also learn some very useful words such as "here and there" and "this and that" and lastly, how to make something plural. Tim, where does this conversation take place?
Tim: "At the restaurant" - 식당에서.
Debbie: The conversation is between...
Tim: Tim and a waitress.
Debbie: Since this conversation is between two adults who don't know each other well, the speakers will use formal Korean.
Tim: 존댓말입니다.
Debbie: Let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
웨이터: 어서오세요!
팀: 자리 있어요?
웨이터: 아 네, 이 자리는 어때요?
팀: 음... 아니요. 저 자리는 어때요?
웨이터: 예.. 그럼 저기 앉으세요.
팀: (비빔밥을 가르키며) 이 비빔밥은 어때요?
웨이터: 그 비빔밥 좋아요.
팀: 여기 반찬들은 어때요?
웨이터: 여기 반찬들 맛있어요.
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
웨이터: 어서오세요!
팀: 자리 있어요?
웨이터: 아 네, 이 자리는 어때요?
팀: 음... 아니요. 저 자리는 어때요?
웨이터: 예.. 그럼 저기 앉으세요.
팀: (비빔밥을 가르키며) 이 비빔밥은 어때요?
웨이터: 그 비빔밥 좋아요.
팀: 여기 반찬들은 어때요?
웨이터: 여기 반찬들 맛있어요.
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
웨이터: 어서오세요!
Debbie: Welcome!
팀: 자리 있어요?
Debbie: Is there an (empty) table?
웨이터: 아 네, 이 자리는 어때요?
Debbie: Ah...yes. How about this table?
팀: 음... 아니요. 저 자리는 어때요?
Debbie: Hmm...no. How about that table?
웨이터: 예.. 그럼 저기 앉으세요.
Debbie: Yes... (You may) sit there then.
팀: (비빔밥을 가르키며) 이 비빔밥은 어때요?
Debbie: (Points at a picture of "bibimbbab") How is the "bibimbbab" (here)?
웨이터: 그 비빔밥 좋아요.
Debbie: That "bibimbbab" is good.
팀: 여기 반찬들은 어때요?
Debbie: How are the side dishes here?
웨이터: 여기 반찬들 맛있어요.
Debbie: The side dishes are delicious here.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Debbie: I really like 'bibimbab'!
Tim: Me, too! And there are so many delicious side dishes. Yum!
Debbie: I know! Korean food is all about using a wide variety of nutritious ingredients.
Tim: Listeners, wherever you are, do not hesitate to try Korean food - especially 'bibimbab.'
Debbie: But Tim...
Tim: What Debbie?
Debbie: When they order "bibimbab" they have to be aware of "gochujang". Gochujang is quite spicy.
Tim: Ah-ha! Thanks Debbie for reminding me about "gochujang". Yes, as Debbie just mentioned, be careful with "gochujang".
Debbie: Tim and I prepared tips on ordering "bibimbab" at a Korean restaurant. 짜잔. This is exclusively for KoreanClass101.com listeners.
Tim: First, go to a Korean restaurant and say 방가 방가 "hello hello" with a big smile. Using 방가 방가 can mean that you can pay less when you pay the check. Give it a try! You have nothing to lose!
Debbie: And when you order 'bibimbab', request for the "gochujang" to be on the side.
Tim: Next, listen to the KoreanClass101.com audio files while waiting for 'bibimbab'.
Debbie: As soon as your 'bibimbab' arrives, mix it with "gochujang". Be aware of 'gochujang'! 'Gochujang' is very spicy so use a little at first, then you can add more of it if you want it spicier.
Tim: Lastly, enjoy your 'bibimbab. If the 'bibimbab' is too spicy, ask for "water". How do you ask for "water"? Remember Lesson #1, Debbie?
Debbie: 물 주세요. "Give me some water, please."
Tim: Excellent!
Debbie: Okay. Let's move on to the vocabulary.
VOCAB LIST
Debbie: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
: The first word we shall see is:
Tim: 어서오세요 [natural native speed]
Debbie: Welcome.
Tim: 어서오세요 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 어서오세요 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 어때요? [natural native speed]
Debbie: How is it? / How about...?
Tim: 어때요? [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 어때요? [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 아니요 [natural native speed]
Debbie: no
Tim: 아니요 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 아니요 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 여기 [natural native speed]
Debbie: here
Tim: 여기 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 여기 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 저기 [natural native speed]
Debbie: there, over there
Tim: 저기 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 저기 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 이것 [natural native speed]
Debbie: this (proper, written form)
Tim: 이것 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 이것 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 저것 [natural native speed]
Debbie: that [proper, written form (far from the listener)]
Tim: 저것 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 저것 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 그것 [natural native speed]
Debbie: that [proper, written form (close to the listener)]
Tim: 그것 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 그것 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 비빔밥 [natural native speed]
Debbie: rice with assorted mixed vegetables, and meat
Tim: 비빔밥 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 비빔밥 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 그럼 [natural native speed]
Debbie: then, if that is the case (contraction of 그러면)
Tim: 그럼 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 그럼 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 이것들 [natural native speed]
Debbie: these
Tim: 이것들 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 이것들 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 저것들 [natural native speed]
Debbie: those
Tim: 저것들 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 저것들 [natural native speed]
: Next:
Tim: 자리 [natural native speed]
Debbie: seat, table, place, position
Tim: 자리 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Tim: 자리 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usuage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Debbie: Let's have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is...?
Tim: 이것. 저것
Debbie: Meaning "this" and "that". Can you repeat them again?
Tim: 이. 것 - 이것 "this" 저.것 - 저것 "that"
Debbie: Can those two words "this" and "that" be used to describe nouns? For example, "this table" or "that table" in English?
Tim: Excellent question, Debbie! Yes! They can describe nouns by simply placing them right before the nouns - just like how it's used in English. "this table", "that table". Let's look at the example "this table". You know "this" is 이것 in Korean and "table" means 자리 in Korean.
Debbie: So... all together "this table" should be 이것 + 자리, 이것 자리!
Tim: However...
Debbie: However?
Tim: You only pronounce the first letter! The first letter is 이, so "this table" becomes 이 + 자리 - 이 자리.
Debbie: How about "that table"?
Tim: "That" is 저것 in Korean and...
Debbie: I only pronounce the first letter 저 when describing nouns so...
Tim: "That table" becomes 저 + 자리 - 저 자리.
Debbie: Great! That sounds pretty easy! What's next?
Tim: Noun + 들!
Debbie: Yes. In English when you make something plural, you add 's' or 'es' right after the noun.
Tim: In Korean, we add 들 instead. For example, let's look at "side dish" from the dialogue. "Side dish" is 반.찬 - 반찬 in Korean.
Debbie: And what's "side dishes" in Korean?
Tim: 반찬.들 - 반찬들.
Debbie: Great! Now let's move on to the grammar.
LESSON FOCUS
Debbie: The focus of this lesson is how to express a very basic and simple "How" question in Korean, like in English "how is [blank]?" or "how about [blank]?"
Tim: We can simply translate "how is or how about" into "어.때.요 - 어때요".
Debbie: In Korean you often politely ask about feelings and opinions by saying 어때요? We need an example. Tim, "How do my clothes look today?"
Tim: Your clothes? Horrible.. Terrible..
Debbie: (with an angry voice) Tim!
Tim: Sorry, Debbie. Just joking! Listeners, "clothes" is 옷 in Korean.
Debbie: "My" is 내 in Korean. So, "How do my clothes look?" is...
Tim: 내 "my" + 옷 "clothes" + 어때요? "how are?" 내 옷 어때요? "How are my clothes?" or "How do my clothes look?"
Debbie: "Horrible! Terrible!"
Tim: Haha. Okay listeners, please repeat after me. 내 옷 어때요?
[pause]
Debbie: Great! By the way Tim...
Tim: What, Debbie?
Debbie: Can I also say, 내 옷"은" 어때요? We learned about particles from Lesson 3.
Tim: Wow, Debbie! 짝짝짝! Great! Actually, 내 옷 어때요 comes from 내 옷"은" 어때요. You are 100% correct!
Debbie: Let's take a look at one more example from the dialogue. What's "How is this bibimbab?" in Korean?
Tim: "This" is 이것 in Korean and "bibimbab" is 비빔밥. When "this" and "that" describes a noun, you only pronounce the first letter. Therefore, "this bibimbab" becomes 이 비빔밥 in Korean.
Debbie: 이 "this" + 비빔밥 "bibimbab" + 어때요? "how is?" so, altogether... it becomes 이 비빔밥 어때요? "How is this bibimbab?"
Tim: Or you may also say 이 비빔밥"은" 어때요? by adding particle 은 right after 이 비빔밥 "this bibimbab".
Debbie: Okay. Let's quickly review the lesson! Listeners, pretend you are in a Korean restaurant and you are about to order 'bibimbab'.
And you Tim, pretend you are a waitress at that Korean restaurant. Be polite to your customer!
Tim: Waitress!? Why waitress!?
Debbie: Okay listeners, let's start! you want to know Tim's opinion on the 'bibimbab' you are about to order. Can you say to Tim, "How is this bibimbab?" in Korean?
Tim: Remember, "this bibimbab" is 이 비빔밥 and "How is..." is 어때요 in Korean.
Debbie: What is "How is this bibimbab" in Korean...?
[pause]
Tim: The answer is 이 비빔밥 어때요? 이 비빔밥은 어때요?
Debbie: Okay. That's all for this lesson. There's a more detailed explanation in the lesson notes, so stop by KoreanClass101.com and pick up the lesson notes. Thank you for listening and thanks, Tim.
Tim: 여러분 다음시간까지 안녕~~

Grammar

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47 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍
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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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This lesson will teach you how to say, "how" in Korean. Please feel free to leave any comment or question. What's "How is the lesson?" in Korean? Tips: the lesson is 수업 sueop

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Greg B
Friday at 2:41 am
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I am seeing "razz" in the comments. What does it mean?

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KoreanClass101.com
Wednesday at 2:39 pm
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Hi Lilia,


Thanks for your comment!

Excellent application! [커피 어때요?] can be used for the both! 👍👍

Good job, and please keep up the good work!.


Best,

Rebecca

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Lilia
Wednesday at 1:29 pm
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So would you say: 커피 어때요? to suggest coffee, or to ask how someone's coffee is after they have tried it?

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KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 8:46 am
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Hi Dez,


Thank you for your positive feedback, it means a lot to us. :smile:

If you were at a supermarket or market and saw a 'tasting/sampling' section, you could go up and ask,

'먹어봐도 돼요?' (meo geo bwado dwaeyo? Can I eat(try) this?)

Another way would be asking if you could 'taste' it to see if you like it or not:

'맛 좀 봐도 돼요?' (mat jeom bwado dwaeyo? Can I taste this?)


Please let us know if you have any other questions.

Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Dez
Sunday at 8:16 pm
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Hi


Thank you for such a wonderful lesson. Just curious, is there a phrase in Korean that means "may I taste this"? For example, if you're at a Korean market and you see many different type of home-made kimchi and want to taste test one or two. Is there a way to ask the seller nicely?

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 10:11 pm
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Hi Whitney,


Thank you for posting.

Both ABS season 1 and two are, as indicated, absolute beginner levels, but as you can see all the lessons are focused on different topics. However, if you feel that you are up for more of a challenge, you could try some of the beginner lessons.


Gamsahamnida!


Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

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whitney
Saturday at 6:42 am
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I'm guessing if you listen to the first Season you aren't meant to listen to the second right after? Seems like the same information mostly?

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Koreanclass101.com
Tuesday at 5:34 pm
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Hi IJa,


안녕하세요. (anneyonghaseyo) 만나서 반갑습니다.


I'm Jaehwi from Koreanclass101.com


Your Korean in romanization looks good : ) Nice to meet you.


May I ask you when you started learning Korean, Ija?


- Jaehwi/ Koreanclass101.com

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ija
Tuesday at 3:40 pm
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anyeonghaseyo..jeonun ija imnida...jeonun malaysiasaramimnida !!! ottaeyo ???

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 11:46 am
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:razz: Hi, Sasa.


요 is the sentence-ending particle. But for the casual conversation, you can use it when you ask something. But the particle 다 is only for ending sentences.


That's why you can only see 왜 자요? , not 왜 자다?


If you'd like to ask something friendly (informally), you can say 왜 자? without any particles.


I hope this helps.


Thank you


- Jaehwi / Koreanclass101.com