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Lesson Transcript

Hi everybody! Jae here. Welcome to Ask a Teacher, where I’ll answer some of your most common Korean questions.
The question for this lesson is…
How do you pronounce the consonants ㅅ[siot] and ㅆ[ssang siot]?
Sometimes, Korean characters change their sound depending on their placement in the word. ㅅ[siot] and ㅆ[ssang siot] are both good examples.
Let’s go over how to pronounce ㅅ[siot] and ㅆ[ssang siot] correctly.
When ㅅ[siot] is at the beginning of a word, it makes an S sound. When it’s the final consonant, in Korean, 받침[batchim], it changes to a T sound.
When ㅆ[ssang siot] is at the beginning of a word, it makes an SS sound, but when it’s in the 받침[batchim] position, it also changes to a T sound.
Let’s do some examples together, so you can hear how they sound!
In the Korean word, 사랑[sarang], which means “love,” the ㅅ[siot] is at the beginning of the word. Therefore it’s pronounced as S.
Let’s do an example with ㅅ[siot] as the final consonant. In the word 맛 [mat] meaning "taste," the ㅅ[siot] is in the 받침[batchim] position, so it’s pronounced as T.
Now, let’s take a look at some examples with ㅆ[ssang siot]. The word, 쓰다[sseuda] which means, “to write,” begins with ㅆ[ssang siot], so the beginning of the word has an SS sound.
Another example would be 있다[itda], which is the Korean word for the verb “to be.” Here, the ㅆ[ssang siot] is in the 받침[batchim] position, so it’s pronounced as T.
Here’s a quick tip. Sometimes, the rules for 받침[batchim] sounds change! So, be sure to check out our Hana Hana Hangul videos on Batchim Rules at KoreanClass101.com!
How was this lesson? Not so bad, right?
Please leave any more questions in the comments below and I’ll try to answer them!
See you next time. 다음 시간에 만나요. (Daeum-sigane mannayo.)

7 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
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What Korean learning question do you have?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 06:16 AM
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Hi Bipendra,


Thanks for posting, we're happy to hear the lesson was of help!

Please let us know if you have any inquiries.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Bipendra singh
Saturday at 07:10 PM
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Really helpful, If I gets difficult again, I will definitely look here

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:38 AM
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Hi Danielle,


Thanks for posting. In this case as it is a double consonant, it is not a 'sh' sound, it is 'ssitji'. (more stress on the 's' sound)


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Danielle
Saturday at 10:33 AM
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Is 씻지 pronounce with the ‘sh’ sound?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 03:39 AM
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Hi Carin,


Thanks for posting. There are 'sh' sounds, especially for double vowels, although they may be romanized differently, they will definitely sound like a 'sh' sound:


쉬/쉐/셔/셰/샤, for example, are romanized as swi/swe/syeo/sye/sya, but will sound like shwi/shwe/shyeo/shye/shya.


Hope this helped.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Carin
Friday at 10:00 AM
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Are siot or ssang siot ever pronounced as the romanized "sh" sound? Thanks.