Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Keith: You Can Do It in Korean. In this lesson, you will learn how to…
Misun: Well, how to express your abilities, -수 있다.
Keith: Okay. And this conversation takes place where?
Misun: In a playground.
Keith: Okay. And the conversation is between…
Misun: Two little kids. Yey! So cute!
Keith: And since they're little kids, they'll be speaking informal Korean.
Misun: 반말.
Keith: All right. Well, let’s listen in to the conversation.

Lesson conversation

태현 나 자전거 탈 수 있어.
소영 나 운전 할 수 있어.
태현 나 날아갈 수 있어.
소영 그래? 해봐!
태현 선생님! 다쳤어요!
English Host: One more time, with the English.
태현 나 자전거 탈 수 있어.
Keith: I can ride a bike.
소영 나 운전 할 수 있어.
Keith: I can drive.
태현 나 날아갈 수 있어.
Keith: I can fly.
소영 그래? 해봐!
Keith: Yeah? Do it!
태현 선생님! 다쳤어요!
Keith: Teacher! I'm hurt!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Keith: Misun, that's a cute conversation!
Misun: Yeah, that’s true. Actually, when I was a kid, I couldn’t drive, but I actually pretend, like, I can drive. It’s just a funny way to do that, like if I’m saying those kind of things like adult is saying.
Keith: Yeah. Yeah. Kids like to have fun like that.
Misun: Right.
Keith: But since they're talking about riding bikes, I want to talk about that in more detail.
Misun: Sure. Kids, of course, ride bikes around their neighborhoods.
Keith: Yup, close by. But what if you're an adult, and you want to ride your bike to work?
Misun: That might be more difficult.
Keith: Yeah. Actually Korea does tend to have a lot of hills, so riding a bike for transportation reasons can be difficult sometimes.
Misun: Yeah. Of course, you’ll see bikes in Korea, but it's not a common form of transportation for adults.
Keith: Right. Especially since public transportation is cheap, too.
Misun: Yeah, it’s very cheap in comparison with here in New York. Buses and subways will go wherever you want, so it's not that common to see someone riding bikes.
Keith: Okay. Well, what if you wanted to ride your bike to work? Are there lanes on the street dedicated to bike riders?
Misun: Well, I saw pretty much a lot of lanes for buses and cars, but I rarely see the bike lanes.
Keith: Yeah. I don’t think I’ve ever seen one in Korea either.
Misun: Maybe, like, some different region down there, maybe they do have a bike, but in Seoul, I don’t see that much.
Keith: Yeah.
Misun: Yeah.
Keith: Because, again, it’s not that common form of transportation.
Misun: No. If you go to Olympic Park, 올림픽공원, then maybe you can see a bike lane.
Keith: Yeah.
Misun: Yeah. Otherwise, it’s not common.
Keith: Okay. Well, let's take a look at the vocab for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Keith: The first word we have is…
Misun: 자전거 [natural native speed].
Keith: Bicycle.
Misun: 자전거 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 자전거 [natural native speed].
Keith: Next is…
Misun: 타다 [natural native speed]
Keith: To ride.
Misun: 타다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 타다 [natural native speed].
Keith: Next.
Misun: 운전하다 [natural native speed]
Keith: To drive.
Misun: 운전하다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 운전하다 [natural native speed].
Keith: Okay. Next.
Misun: 날다 [natural native speed]
Keith: To fly, to fly away.
Misun: 날다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 날다 [natural native speed].
Keith: Next.
Misun: 그래? [natural native speed]
Keith: Sure. All right.
Misun: 그래? [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 그래? [natural native speed].
Keith: Next is…
Misun: 해 봐 [natural native speed]
Keith: Do it, try it, show me.
Misun: 해 봐 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 해 봐 [natural native speed].
Keith: Next.
Misun: 다치다 [natural native speed]
Keith: To get hurt, to get injured.
Misun: 다치다 [slowly - broken down by syllable]. 다치다 [natural native speed].
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Keith: All right. Well, take a closer look at some of the words and phrases.
Misun: Sure. The first word we’ll look at is 타다.
Keith: Which means “to ride.”
Misun: 타다. So you can ride a subway, a car, a bus, a bicycle, an airplane.
Keith: Right, anything that's moving. So I think we should go over this word for our listeners who may want to get some directions from somebody.
Misun: How Good idea! Let's start with the sub way.
Keith: Okay. So Misun, how do we say , “ride the subway”? If someone’s telling you, “ride the subway.”
Misun: It’s 지하철을 타요
Keith: Now, let's tell someone to ride line number 1.
Misun: 1호선 타요.
Keith: Okay. What's line #1 again?
Misun: 1호선
Keith: So line number 2 would be?
Misun: 2호선.
Keith: So "ride line #2" would be...
Misun: 2호선 타요.
Keith: Okay. And just for good measure, what’s line #3?
Misun: Of course, 3호선. / 3호선.
Keith: Okay.
Misun: So "ride line #3" would be, 3호선 타요.
Keith: Great. What's out next word?
Misun: Our next word is 해봐.
Keith: Try it, or show me.
Misun: That’s right. There's different nuances depending on the situation.
Keith: So if I'm claiming I can speak French but you don't believe me, you can say...
Misun: 해봐!
Keith: Show me.
Misun: Right. So you use it when you want someone to do something, so you can see.
Keith: Right. The other use is when you're doing something and you want someone else to try it, too.
Misun: Right. If you're at a kitchen, making some 만두, which means dumplings, you can suggest to your friend to try making it, too.
Keith: Yeah. So if you suggest someone to try it themselves, you can just say...
Misun: 해봐!
Keith: And there it means "try it."

Lesson focus

Misun: Let’s move onto the focus of this lesson.
Keith: Okay.
Misun: The focus of this lesson is -을 수 있다.
Keith: And this is used to express ability, capability, or possibility.
Misun: Yeah. For example, if you can speak English, or if you can use a computer.
Keith: Right, the ability to do so. This structure can be translated as "can," or "able to."
Misun: 네 맞아요. To use this construction, just take the verb stem of the verb and attach -을 수 있다
Keith: Yes. But since this is absolute beginner, we don't want our listeners to focus on the construction. Instead, we have a few useful examples.
Misun: The first one is, 영어 할 수 있어요.
Keith: "I can speak English."
Misun: So this can be useful if you're in Korea, but don't understand some Korean.
Keith: Right. So if you want to say you can understand English, just say...
Misun: 영어 할 수 있어요.
Keith: Okay, our next example is...
Misun: 할 수 있어요.
Keith: Which simply means, "I can do it."
Misun: 네. This can be useful if you're at work, and your boss is asking you to do something.
Keith: Or maybe your teacher is telling you to do something.
Misun: 네. You can respond with, 할 수 있어요.
Keith: “I can do it.” And this will be good to let your boss or teacher know that you can do something!
Misun: Okay. Our last one is, 갈 수 있어요.
Keith: "I can go."
Misun: So this can be useful if you're invited somewhere.
Keith: Right. Your friend wants to see if you can go watch a movie Saturday...
Misun: Then you can respond with, 갈 수 있어요.
Keith:Let’s take a look at how it came out in this dialogue.
Misun: Sure! The first one was, 나 자전거 탈 수 있어.
Keith: "I can ride a bike."
Misun: Then it was 나 운전할 수 있어.
Keith: "I can drive."
Misun: And finally was, 나 날아갈 수 있어.
Keith: “I can fly.”

Outro

Keith: Okay. Well, that’s just about does it for today. Bye-bye, everyone!
Misun: 네 여러분 안녕히 계세요.

Grammar

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30 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Let's practice. 연습해 보아요.

Can you cook any Korean food?

"저는 김치찌개 할 수 있어요. 근데, 김치는 할 줄 몰라요."

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Saturday at 06:20 AM
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Hi Christina,


Thank you for posting, I'm really glad our answer was of help!

Yes, when used in the second phrase, 은/는 is used to show contrast (you could do A, but not B).


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Christina
Sunday at 04:21 AM
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Thank you so much! I've realized my typo (저는) meanwhile but the rest I wouldn't have managed. Your advice is great, thank you!

Just to clarify, the 은/는 particle in the second sentence is used to show contrast, isn't it?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:06 AM
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Hi Christina,


Thanks for posting. If you want to say that you can't cook Korean food but you eat it, one way to write it would be:


자는 한국 음식을 요리 할 수 없어요. 그런데, 밥을 식당에 먹어요.

-->저는 한국 음식을 요리 할 수 없어요. 그런데 한국 음식은 잘 먹어요. /저는 한국 음식을 잘 먹어요. 근데 만들줄은 몰라요.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Christina
Wednesday at 04:44 AM
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Hello everyone!


자는 한국 음식을 요리 할 수 없어요. 그런데, 밥을 식당에 먹어요.

Does that make sense? If not, how could it make sense?😄


고맙습니다!

Christina

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Friday at 04:58 PM
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Hi Bhavya,


Thank you for posting. Some phrases to say 'cannot do' in Korean:


할 수 없다 --->cannot do

못 하다 --->cannot do


A similar phrase with a slightly different nuance would be:

안 하다 ---> will not do


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Bhavya
Monday at 03:40 PM
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and thrre are also 2 ways of expressing "cannot do" -ㄹ/을 수 있다 and 못 해요 so which one is use when?

Bhavya
Monday at 03:36 PM
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there are 2 ways to express desire to do someting -ㄹ/을 래 and 보고 샆다 so which one is use when?

KoreanClass101.com
Saturday at 07:26 AM
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Hi Anson,


Thanks for posting. '날아갈' is the future base form of '날아가다' and means 'will fly(away)'.


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Anson
Wednesday at 04:59 PM
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날아갈

I particularly don't understand this part

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Thursday at 12:37 AM
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Hello Denisse,


Thank you SO MUCH for all your comments! We LOVE your comments!

I'm so sorry if I made you feel that way! 😭

Here are my answers to your questions.

Q1. I wonder why in "나 날아갈 수 있어" the verb to fly 날다 is conjugated like that.

A. Here, the verb we used is [날아가다] which means "fly (away/off)". It's slightly different from [날다].

Q2. Which one is correct 벌 수 있어요 or벌을 수 있어요?

A. [벌 수 있어요.] is the right one. [ㄹ] gets the special treatment quite often in Korean. So when the verb stem ends in [ㄹ], the final consonant [ㄹ] is removed, and [-ㄹ 수 있다] is added to the verb stems like those that end in vowels.

Hope my answer cleared your questions, and thank you for your patience!


Best,

Rebecca

Team KoreanClass101.com