Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

In Korea, there are numerous ways to say "thank you." The level of respect differs according to relationship. First, we'll take a look at the phrase we use toward strangers and to those that we wish to respect. The first "thank you" is gamsahamnida (감사합니다 ). It's respectful, commonly heard, quick, and easy. You will probably hear this form most frequently.
Next is gomapseumnida (고맙습니다). This is respectful and we can use it toward strangers as well. Koreans don't use it quite as frequently as gamsahamnida, but it's still very common. The two that we have covered so far are nearly identical in terms of respect. The first, gamsahamnida, is a tiny bit more respectful than gomapseumnida, but it's only a very slight difference.
Koreans don't use this next one every day; rather, they use it for special occasions when someone has really broken his or her back to do you a favor. This form offers the highest level of gratitude. This "thank you" is daedanhi gamsahamnida (대단히 감사합니다). Literally, this means "great thanks."
Last is the informal "thank you," which you should only use with close and intimate friends and family (an uncle you are meeting for the first time doesn't cut it!). This informal form is gomawo (고마워). There are a few relationships with which the informal language is acceptable to use. For more on that, check out Quick Tip 1.
It is important to be as polite and respectful as possible. So if you're ever in doubt, use the formal "thank you," gamsahamnida or gomapseumnida (감사합니다 or 고맙습니다).

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KoreanClass101.com
Wednesday at 6:30 pm
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Thank you everyone! 감사합니다!

Saturday at 9:55 am
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Hi Sakura,

Thank you for posting. After the 7 day trial, you will get access to the first three lessons per series, and newly updated lessons. To see what you can access with your free account please click here:

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Lyn
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Sakura
Thursday at 1:11 am
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Hi KoreanClass101, I was wondering if after the 7 day trial and with a free account, am I still able to view the lesson materials such as vocabulary MP3? Thank you

Wednesday at 4:25 pm
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Hello Essence,

Thank you for posting. Unfortunately, you do need to upgrade your account to get access to additional material, although you get access the first three lessons per series, as well as new lessons updated to the website. :disappointed:
And to answer your question, your name, Essence, would be written in Korean as 에센스.

Sincerely,
Lyn
Team KoreanClass101.com

Essence
Tuesday at 8:31 am
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How are the listeners who don’t have money to upgrade to premium supposed to get the vocabulary for the lessons?
Also, how would I write my name in Korean? It’s Essence

Thursday at 9:34 am
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Hi Jay,

Thank you for posting. The consonant ㅂ usually takes on the ‘b/p’ sound in English, but when it is used as a batchim (words or syllables that end with a consonant), the pronunciation changes due to the ‘batchim’ rules, which is why instead of it being pronounced ‘hapnida’ it is pronounced as ‘hamnida’. You can find lessons explaining these rules here:

https://www.koreanclass101.com/2012/04/20/hana-hana-hangul-11-hangul-batchim-1/
(Lessons 11-16)

Cheers,
Lyn
Team KoreanClass101.com

Jay
Tuesday at 1:26 pm
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I am having trouble breaking down the Hangul blocks and the Romanization of the phrases. For example:

감사합니다. or 고맙습니다.

Gamsahamnida. or Gomapseumnida.

If 합 means ham (in gamsahamnida) but 감 means Gam; why isn’t the box in gam a full box and the box in ham is not? It has longer ends in ham. Do they both mean the sound (m) if they are different shapes? How do you distinguish how to make the box for (m)?

Thursday at 6:29 pm
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Hello Jeremy,

Thank you for your question.
Please check the following link to get more info on how to upgrade to a premium subscription:
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Lena
Team KoreanClass101.com

Monday at 9:54 pm
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Hi Lance,

Thank you for posting. If you are asking how you can type Korean characters, you would first need to download or add the Korean keyboard to your keyboard. You can find the layout of which vowels and consonants are placed on the regular keyboard by typing ‘Korean keyboard’ at a search engine.
Hope this answered your question. Please let us know if you have any other inquiries.

Cheers,
Lyn
Team KoreanClass101.com

JEREMY
Saturday at 8:28 am
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HOW TO BE A PREMIUM USER SO YOU CAN DOWNLOAD MANY PDF AS YOU LIKE?

Lance
Friday at 7:59 pm
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How To Write In Korea? Its So Hard When Writing :disappointed: