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Lesson Transcript

안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo)
Hello and welcome to Korean survival phrases brought to you by KoreanClass101.com, this course is designed to equip you with the language skills and knowledge to enable you to get the most out of your visit to Korea. You will be surprised at how far a little Korean will go. Now, before we jump in, remember to stop by KoreanClass101.com and there, you will find the accompanying PDF and additional info in the post. If you stop by, be sure to leave us the comment.
In today’s lesson, we will continue with our Riding the Rails series. In our previous lesson, Riding the Rails 1, we went over how to get a ticket at a train station. That phrase was 서울역 한 장 주세요 (seoulyeok han jang juseyo). One more time it’s 서울역 한 장 주세요 (seoulyeok han jang juseyo). This phrase literally means Seoul Station, one ticket please but in Korea, there is even a simpler and shorter way of asking for ticket. A disclaimer should be made however. Today’s lesson will focus on getting a ticket at subway stations. Let’s get a ticket to Busan Station. To say Busan station, we can say the name of the station 부산 (busan) and then add on the word for station which is 역 (yeok). So in today’s lesson, the location we will be using is 부산역 (busanyeok) or in English Busan Station. One time slowly, it’s 부산역 (busanyeok).
To get a ticket to Busan station, we can use the phrase we learned previously. We can simply replace the location. Our new phrase is 부산역 한 장 주세요 (busanyeok han jang juseyo). One time slowly, it’s 부산역 한 장 주세요 (busanyeok han jang juseyo). And by syllable, 부-산-역 한 장 주-세-요 (bu-san-yeok han jang ju-se-yo). The first part of the phrase is 부산역 (busanyeok) as we went over, this means Busan Station. The next part of the phrase is 한 장 (han jang). This means one ticket. One time slowly, 한 장 (han jang). The last part of the phrase is 주세요 (juseyo) or please. 주세요 (juseyo). So altogether, this literally means Busan Station one ticket please. But subway stations during morning rush hour are hectic. People tend to try to cut around the corners if they can to be as time efficient as possible. Even in New York, I read in the paper that the MTA or the Transit Authority of New York asked their train conductors to refrain from saying things such as good morning and please.
This was all in an effort to be as time efficient as possible and as Korean subways can get pretty busy just like New York can, people try to cut as many corners as possible and if New York train conductors don’t have to say please, we don’t have to either. A shorter way we can get a ticket is to say, one ticket to Busan Station. This in Korean would be 부산역 한 장. The last part 주세요 (juseyo) is no longer in the phrase. Here we are not being rude, we are just in a rush. So one more time, it’s 부산역 한 장 (busanyeok han jang). Lastly we can shorten this even more. If we are really short on time, we can just say the station name 부산역 (busanyeok). One time slowly, it’s 부산역 (busanyeok). This will be understood as one ticket. Once again, these shortened abbreviations are used mainly for the subways where rush hour calls for anything quick and easy.
If you were to use this at a long distance train terminal, the ticket vendors may ask you, how many people or which train you want to take. Here, you can just say the station name and get a ticket, fast and easy. Now for those of you who haven’t been to Korea yet, the subways may take a little getting used to. The ticket system maybe a little different from what you expect. In Korea, if you want to get a ticket to Busan Station and if you are in a rush, you can just say 부산역 (busanyeok) then they will give you the ticket. Now, once you have your subway ticket, you have to place that ticket in the ticket gate. Once you enter the gate, the ticket will come back out. You take that ticket and hold on to it.
You need this ticket to exit. So once you get to your station, just insert the ticket once again into the gate.
Okay. To close our today’s lesson, we’d like for you to practice what you’ve learned. I will provide you with the English equivalent of the phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out loud. You will have a few seconds before I give you the answer. So 화이팅 (hwaiting)!
One ticket to Busan station please - 부산역 한 장 주세요 (busanyeok han jang juseyo).
One ticket to Busan station - 부산역 한 장 (busanyeok han jang)
Busan station - 부산역 (busanyeok)
All right, that’s going to do it for today. Remember to stop by KoreanClass101.com and pick up the accompanying PDF. If you stop by, be sure to leave us a comment.

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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What do you think about Seoul's railway system?

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KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 10:34 am
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Hi Lu,


Thanks for commenting. We checked the audio files and found no problem listening to them. Could you try logging out and then back again and let us know if you are still experiencing trouble?


Sincerely,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

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Lu
Thursday at 1:40 am
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The audio is not working on this lesson.

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KoreanClass101.com
Tuesday at 6:56 pm
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:razz:Hi, Hemant.


Like you said they don't display how many minutes left. As you mentioned, they shows where the train is (how many stops left). That's why Korean people check their iPhones or Smart-phones to check what time the train will be arriving.

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Hemant
Tuesday at 10:29 am
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Having lived in Singapore for a while, I'm used to seeing how many minutes are left before the train arrives. I was expecting something similar in Korea but I was wrong!


It was interesting to see how people have to calculate the time of arrival based on when it was at the last station :)

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Rae
Saturday at 5:35 am
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감사합니다 !


Thank you for all the lessons ~