Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Matt: Verb Normalizing Particles. Matt Here.
Kyejin: 안녕하세요. And I'm Kyejin.
Matt: In this lesson, you’ll learn particles that normalize verbs. The conversation takes place in the kitchen of a friend’s house.
Kyejin: It's between Juha and Jaesuk.
Matt: The speakers are friends; so they’ll be using informal Korean. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
주하: 재석아, 이 핸드폰은 어떻게 사용하는 거야?
재석: 봐봐, 여기 아이콘이 두 개가 있지? 이건 켜는 것이고 이건 끄는 거야.
주하: 그럼 이걸 누르면 켜는 거 맞아?
재석: 응, 그리고 이 버튼은 카메라를 실행시키는 거야.
주하: 이게 카메라라고?
재석: 아니, 이건 전화를 거는 버튼이고 이게 카메라 아이콘이지.
Matt: Listen to the conversation one time slowly.
주하: 재석아, 이 핸드폰은 어떻게 사용하는 거야?
재석: 봐봐, 여기 아이콘이 두 개가 있지? 이건 켜는 것이고 이건 끄는 거야.
주하: 그럼 이걸 누르면 켜는 거 맞아?
재석: 응, 그리고 이 버튼은 카메라를 실행시키는 거야.
주하: 이게 카메라라고?
재석: 아니, 이건 전화를 거는 버튼이고 이게 카메라 아이콘이지.
Matt: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Juha: Hey Jaeseok, how do you use this cell phone?
Jaeseok: Look, there are two icons, right? This one turns it on and this one turns it off.
Juha: So if I press this, it turns on, right?
Jaeseok: Yes, and this button launches the camera.
Juha: This is the camera?
Jaeseok: No, this is for making calls and this one is the camera.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Matt: What were some of those loan words in the dialogues, Kyejin?
Kyejin: Well, we had 카메라 which means “camera”, 아이콘 for “icons”, 버튼 for “buttons”.
Matt: Is it common to use loan words in daily conversation?
Kyejin: In the past, Korean tried to make its own words when new items were introduced. But these days, you hear more loan words which sound almost the same as the original pronunciation in English.
Matt: Can you give us some examples?
Kyejin: Sure. I’ll say the Korean loan words with Korean pronunciation, and you can guess what it means. The first one is 아이스크림.
Matt: Hmm, that sounds like Icecream.
Kyejin: That’s right. And we also have.. 스마트폰
Matt: Smartphones?
Kyejin: Yes! When we say loan words, we tend to put batchim if possible. So instead of saying 스맛폰, we say 스마트폰 and write it that way.
Matt: But in North Korea, it’s a bit different, right? I’ve heard that in North Korea, people make pure Korean versions of words when new items are introduced. Even “ice cream” has its own word.
Kyejin: That’s right. Instead of saying 아이스크림 (aiseu-keurim) to mean “ice cream”, North Koreans would say, "얼음보숭이" (eoreumbosungi), which is a Korean word literally meaning “ice crumbs.”
Matt: That’s interesting! Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Matt: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Kyejin: 핸드폰 [natural native speed]
Matt: cell phone
Kyejin: 핸드폰[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 핸드폰 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 아이콘 [natural native speed]
Matt: icon
Kyejin: 아이콘[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 아이콘 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 개 [natural native speed]
Matt: counting-unit word for general or non-specific items, units, objects
Kyejin: 개[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 개 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 켜다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to turn on
Kyejin: 켜다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 켜다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 끄다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to put off, to turn off
Kyejin: 끄다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 끄다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 버튼 [natural native speed]
Matt: button
Kyejin: 버튼[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 버튼 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 실행하다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to implement, to execute
Kyejin: 실행하다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 실행하다 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 카메라 [natural native speed]
Matt: camera
Kyejin: 카메라[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 카메라 [natural native speed]
Matt: Next we have..
Kyejin: 전화를 걸다 [natural native speed]
Matt: to make a telephone call
Kyejin: 전화를 걸다[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Kyejin: 전화를 걸다 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Matt: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first word is..
Kyejin: We have a set of words, 켜다 and 끄다.
Matt: meaning “to turn on” and “to turn of”.
Kyejin: The first word 켜다 (kyeoda) is a verb which means "to turn on" or "to light."
Matt: You can use the verb to mean “to turn on a machine.” or “to turn on a light.” The next one has the opposite meaning, right?
Kyejin: Yes. 끄다 (kkuda) is a verb that means "to turn off" or "to put out."
Matt: These two verbs are antonyms and you use them primarily when you’re talking about operating electrical devices, turning on and off a light switch, lighting candles, or starting and putting out a fire.
Kyejin: You can use this verb with a noun for an object, and an object marking particle 을 or 를.
Matt: How do you say.. “to turn on a computer”?
Kyejin: You can say 컴퓨터를 켜다.
Matt: What about “to turn off a computer”?
Kyejin: 컴퓨터를 끄다.
Matt: Okay, what’s the next word?
Kyejin: 누르다
Matt: This is a verb that means "to press," “to push," or "to apply pressure to something."
Kyejin: 누르다 can be used to ask phrases like, 버튼을 눌러주세요. (beoteuneul nulleojuseyo) ..
Matt: which means, "Please press the button." The meaning of this verb can change depending on the context of a sentence. For example the sentence,
Kyejin: 감정을 좀 눌러주세요. (gamjeongeul jom nulleojuseyo)
Matt: means, "Please restrain your emotions." or literally “Please press down your emotions.” The verb is exactly the same, but the context of the sentence changed its meaning to "to restrain."
Kyejin: It also has the meaning of “to make someone defeated.” You can imagine yourself pressing down the other team with your finger.
Matt: Can you give us an example?
Kyejin: Sure. 농구 경쟁자들을 다 눌렀습니다. (nonggu gyeongjaengjadeureul da nulleotseumnida)..
Matt: which means "All of the competition in the basketball game was defeated." Okay, now onto the grammar.

Lesson focus

Matt: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to use particles that normalize verbs
Kyejin: In the last lesson, we learned about the modifying particles 는 and ㄴ(니은.) and the noun 것 meaning “thing.”
Matt: We introduced how to make a descriptive verb into an adjective using these. In this lesson, we’re going to use action verbs and the same technique to make an action verb into a noun.
Kyejin: Action verbs are something like 가다 meaning “to go” or 오다 meaning “to come”, which is related to the actual action.
Matt: With the action verbs, we only need to use one particle, right?
Kyejin: That’s right. You need to use only the particle 는, even if the verb stem ends in a vowel.
Matt: So how would you make the verb meaning “to go” into a noun meaning “going”?
Kyejin: It’s the same as in the last lesson. First, get the verb-stem. 가다 is the verb meaning “to go” so the verb-stem is 가. To the verb-stem, you can attach the particle 는.
Matt: Then it becomes..
Kyejin: 가는. It means “going.”, but to make it like a noun, you need one extra word, which is 것.
Matt: So “going” as a noun in Korean will be…
Kyejin: 가는 것. The structure will be [Verb-stem] plus, 는 것.
Matt: And there’s another word meaning “thing” right?
Kyejin: Yes. For spoken Korean, we use 거 more than 것. Both mean “thing.” 가는 것. or 가는 거.
Matt: Note that the first one is more natural in written Korean, and the second one is more natural in spoken Korean. Can you give us an example? How would you say “I don’t like going to school.” in Korean?
Kyejin: The sentence meaning “to go to school” is 학교에 가다. Here, you can add a modifying particle to the verb-stem of this sentence. 가 ends in a vowel, so I can say 학교에 가는. To make the phrase work like a noun, I can add 것 or 거.
Matt: So “going to a school” is..?
Kyejin: 학교에 가는 것 for written Korean, or 학교에 가는 거 for spoken Korean.
Matt: Okay. So what’s the full sentence?
Kyejin: To mean “I don’t like going to school”, you can say 학교에 가는 것이 싫다. Or 학교에 가는 거가 싫다.
Matt: What about “meeting a friend”?
Kyejin: 친구를 만나다 is the sentence meaning “to meet a friend.” Using this, you can first say 친구를 만나는, then add 것 or 거. So the noun meaning “meeting a friend” will be 친구를 만나는 것, or 친구를 만나는 거.
Matt: And.. there’s another usage too, right?
Kyejin: Yes. 거 or 것 can also mean “a thing to do something.” For example, 컴퓨터를 켜는 것 means both “turning on a computer” as a noun, or “a thing to turn on a computer.”
Matt: When the phrase has the second meaning, there should be a subject with the particle
Kyejin: 은
Matt: or
Kyejin: 는
Matt: in the sentence referring to that.
Kyejin: That’s right. For example, 이 버튼은 컴퓨터를 켜는 것이야.
Matt: Which literally means “This button is a thing to turn on a computer.” Listeners, for more information, please check the lesson notes.

Outro

Matt: Well, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Kyejin: 안녕히 계세요.

5 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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What's your favorite Korean loanword?

KoreanClass101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:29 AM
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안녕하세요 robert groulx,


You are very welcome. 😇

Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

We wish you good luck with your language studies.


Kind regards,

레벤테 (Levente)

Team KoreanClass101.com

robert groulx
Sunday at 12:41 AM
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thank you for the lesson


my favorite is 컴퓨터를 켜는 것


robert

KoreanClass101.com
Thursday at 12:46 AM
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Hi Sebastian,


Thanks for pointing this out to us. We'll get back to you on this.


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Sebastian
Monday at 05:02 PM
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누르다 is not in the vocabulary list, but discussed in the audio.