Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Minkyong: 안녕하세요. KoreanClass101.com의 지민경입니다.
Keith: Hey and I am Keith. Welcome to Newbie Series, Season 3, Lesson 21. Learn How to Get More of What You Want in Korea.
Minkyong: Hello everyone, I am Minkyong and welcome to KoreanClass101.
Keith: With us, you will learn to speak Korean with fun and effective lessons.
Minkyong: We also provide you with cultural insights
Keith: And tips you won’t find in a textbook. So Minkyong, what are we taking a look at in this lesson? And it’s a good one today, isn’t it?
Minkyong: Yeah. In this lesson, you will learn how to say more in Korean 더.
Keith: And this conversation takes place at home. Who is the conversation between?
Minkyong: The conversation is between two sisters.
Keith: And because they are sisters, of course
Minkyong: They will be speaking in 반말.
Keith: Informal Korean.
Minkyong: Remember, commenting each day
Keith: And posting in the forum are two great ways to get answers.
Minkyong: Community members
Keith: And the staff are all ready to help.
Minkyong: Definitely take advantage.
Keith: Okay. How about we take a listen to the conversation?
Minkyong: 네, 들어 봅시다.
DIALOGUE
미아: 아... 머리 아파.
mia: meori apa.
지훈: 진짜? 이 약 먹어.
jihoon: jinjja? i yak meogeo.
미아: 고마워.
mia: gomawo.
지훈: 어때?
jihoon: eottae?
미아: 아... 더 아파.
mia: a... deo apa.
지훈: 더? 음... 약 더 먹어.
jihoon: deo? eum... yak deo meogeo.
미아: 아... 더 아파... 이 약 뭐야?
mia: a... deo apa... i yak mwoya?
지훈: 소화제.
jihoon: sohwaje.
미아: 아... 머리 아파.
mia: meori apa.
Mia: I have a headache.
지훈: 진짜? 이 약 먹어.
jihoon:jinjja? i yak meogeo.
Jihoon: Really? Take this medicine.
미아: 고마워.
mia: gomawo.
Mia: Thanks.
지훈: 어때?
jihoon: eottae?
Jihoon: How are you feeling?
미아: 아... 더 아파.
mia: a... deo apa.
Mia: Oh...it's getting worse.
지훈: 더? 음... 약 더 먹어.
jihoon: deo? eum... yak deo meogeo.
Jihoon: Worse? Hmm...take more medicine.
미아: 아... 더 아파... 이 약 뭐야?
mia: a... deo apa... i yak mwoya?
Mia: Oh...I feel worse...what's this medicine?
지훈: 소화제.
jihoon: sohwaje.
Jihoon: Indigestion medicine…
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Minkyong: You should really check what you are taking before you actually take any medicine.
Keith: Well, I don’t think any indigestion medicine would be so much harm.
Minkyong: But you never know. Taking indigestion for any headache can’t be so good. You might be left with a headache and a stomachache.
Keith: Okay well instead of indigestion medicine, what’s a traditional Korean solution for headaches or stomachaches?
Minkyong: The most popular one is called 게보린.
Keith: 게보린. And is that a brand name for medicine?
Minkyong: Yeah it’s a brand name like Tylenol and Advil.
Keith: Okay so 게보인 is the Tylenol of Korea.
Minkyong: That’s right.
Keith: And they have everything from headaches to stomachaches to leg aches, eye aches, no?
Minkyong: Yeah probably. I think you can take it for everything.
Keith: Well, but if some of our listeners are in Korea and they are sick, they are hurt, oh my head hurts, what can they say to the pharmacist, hey I want some Tylenol. If they said Tylenol, would the pharmacist understand?
Minkyong: Yes. Tylenol is pretty common in Korea too. So if you want a Tylenol, you could just ask for 타이레놀 주세요.
Keith: Or if you want some – I don’t know if it’s traditional Korean medicine but Korean style modern medicine.
Minkyong: Yes.
Keith: You can ask for
Minkyong: 게보린 주세요.
Keith: Okay. How about we take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson? The first word we are going to take a look at is
VOCAB LIST
Minkyong: 머리
Keith: Head.
Minkyong: 머리 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 머리 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next we have
Minkyong: 아파.
Keith: It hurts, I am sick.
Minkyong: 아파 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 아파 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next we have
Minkyong: 진짜
Keith: Really
Minkyong: 진짜 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 진짜 [natural native speed]
Keith: After that
Minkyong: 먹어.
Keith: I eat, eat.
Minkyong: 먹어 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 먹어 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next
Minkyong: 고마워.
Keith: Thanks
Minkyong: 고마워 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 고마워 [natural native speed]
Keith: And after that
Minkyong: 어때?
Keith: How is it, how about
Minkyong: 어때 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 어때 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next
Minkyong: 소화제
Keith: Digestive medicine.
Minkyong: 소화제 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 소화제 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next
Minkyong: 약
Keith: Medicine, drug.
Minkyong: 약 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 약 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: All right. So let’s really dig deep into these words and find out how to use some of these words in context. So what’s the first word we are going to take a look at?
Minkyong: 머리.
Keith: Head and how do we say I have a headache, my head hurts.
Minkyong: In Korean, we say literally my head hurts. So we say 머리 아파.
Keith: Okay and what’s that last word?
Minkyong: 아파.
Keith: Hurt and how do we say that more politely?
Minkyong: 아파요.
Keith: Right. We just add on that 요 at the end. Okay so how do you say you are very sick? I am very, very sick.
Minkyong: 많이 아파요.
Keith: Okay and what’s that first word?
Minkyong: 많이.
Keith: And that’s literally a lot or many and after that, once again we have
Minkyong: 아파요.
Keith: Hurt, a lot hurt and that’s to say, I am very sick. How about when you are hurting, when I am hurt, not sick.
Minkyong: It’s the same. 아파요.
Keith: Right. So we can use 아파요 for both hurting and sick. Let’s say I bump my leg into my sofa which happens pretty often to me actually, my toe. My toe gets stumped. So instead of oh, my foot is hurt, how would I say it’s hurt?
Minkyong: 아파요.
Keith: Okay and how about if I am actually sick like I am throwing up ahh…
Minkyong: 아파요.
Keith: Right. We use both of them for the same thing. Okay so what’s our next word?
Minkyong: 약.
Keith: Medicine or drug. And what kind of 약 came out in this dialogue, what kind of medicine?
Minkyong: 소화제.
Keith: And that’s digestive medicine. Okay, how do we say, take some medicine?
Minkyong: 약 먹어 or 약 먹어요.
Keith: So if you want to say, take some digestion medicine, what can we say?
Minkyong: 소화제 먹어.
Keith: Right. So instead of saying, take medicine, we are saying, eat medicine in Korean and what’s that word to eat again?
Minkyong: 먹어.
Keith: Right. So when we say take medicine, we are saying eat medicine.
Minkyong: 약 먹어.
Keith: And to be polite, just once again add on that 요 at the end.
Minkyong: 약 먹어요.
Keith: Okay how about we take a look at the focus for this lesson?
Minkyong: 네, 넘어가요.

Lesson focus

Minkyong: The focus of this lesson is how to say more 더.
Keith: And 더 is used in the same way as the English word more in the sentence. It can be used as a noun, an adjective or an adverb and it comes before the word that it’s modifying. For example, how do we say it’s expensive?
Minkyong: 비싸요.
Keith: So how do we say it’s more expensive?
Minkyong: 더 비싸요.
Keith: Right. So here, the word order is the same as it is in Korean, more and then expensive. Okay can we have another sample sentence?
Minkyong: 더 먹어.
Keith: That’s literally more eat. There it’s not the same, hah! The word order.
Minkyong: Oh 진짜네요.
Keith: Right but in English, it comes afterwards, eat more but in Korean, it always comes before the adjective or the verb. So pretty easy to remember. All you’ve got to do is put it in front of what you are modifying and then there you go. So how about another sample sentence? How do you say, do you have more of this?
Minkyong: 이거 더 있어?
Keith: And how did it come out in this dialogue?
Minkyong: 더 아파.
Keith: It hurts more but once again that more 더 is coming before
Minkyong: 아파.
Keith: So it hurts more
Minkyong: 더 아파.
Keith: How did it come out in this dialogue?
Minkyong: 더? 음… 약 더 먹어.
Keith: More, hmm take more medicine and once again, that’s literally eat more medicine. In Korean, we say eat medicine instead of take medicine. Okay before we wrap up, can you give us some more examples?
Minkyong: 더 예뻐요.
Keith: It’s prettier but literally it’s more pretty.
Minkyong: Or KoreanClass101 더 듣고 싶어요.

Outro

Keith: I want to listen to KoreanClass101.com more and ain’t that a fact. Okay so that just about does it for this lesson. Now don’t forget to stop by KoreanClass101.com and pick up the lesson notes.
Minkyong: It has the conversation transcript.
Keith: Vocab, sample sentences, a grammar explanation
Minkyong: And the cultural insights section.
Keith: Seeing the Korean really helps you remember faster but don’t take our word for it.
Minkyong: Please have a look for yourself.
Keith: And don’t forget to let us know what you think. All right, well that’s going to do it. Thanks for listening.
Minkyong: 안녕히 계세요.
Keith: Bye bye.

Grammar

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24 Comments

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Sorry, please keep your comment under 800 characters. Got a complicated question? Try asking your teacher using My Teacher Messenger.

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Monday at 6:30 pm
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In what situation would you use the word 더 (deo)? Can you give us some examples? :)

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Friday at 9:58 am
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Hi Fredrik,


Thank you for posting. Great effort! Let's take a look at what you wrote:


마니 사람을 영어가 아라요.

-->많은 사람들이 영어를 할 줄 알아요. (~ㄹ 줄 알다=to know how to do something/are able to do something)


Keep up the good work and please let us know if you have any other inquiries!


Best,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Fredrik Konradsson
Thursday at 5:32 am
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마니 사람을 영어가 아라요.

Well. I tried my best at least :laughing:

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Monday at 9:30 pm
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Hi Fredrik,


Thank you for posting. Would you like to try writing that sentence in Korean so that we can offer you the grammatical correction? :smile: You can do it!


Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

Fredrik Konradsson
Friday at 11:19 pm
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How do you say: "Many persons know the English language" in Korean? :smile:

KoreanClass101.comVerified
Wednesday at 10:57 am
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Hi Alyssa Scruton,


Yes, it makes perfect sense! :thumbsup:

Thanks for sharing your study tips and I hope many of our users will try it out.


감사합니다.

Claire

Team KoreanClass101.com

Alyssa Scruton
Monday at 11:42 am
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안녕하세요


I've taken some inspiration from my French class and started writing the dialogue as I listened. While practicing French my professor will read aloud a chunk of text three times. The first time is only for listening to the dialogue. The second time will be read slowly so we can write as we listen. Then the third time we listen again and follow along what we wrote to see if we made any mistakes.


So while listening to the lessons, I like to listen to the dialogue and then try to write down what I hear when it's repeated slowly the second time. Then when I'm done, I check the lesson notes to correct any mistakes I may have made.


This way I'm making my brain hear what's being said and then process and understand it as it is, as opposed to trying to translate it into English to understand it. It's like it makes you think in that language instead of understanding the language by thinking in English (if that makes ANY sense). I've found that it's really helpful so hopefully someone else will too! :smile:

Koreanclass101.comVerified
Monday at 1:10 pm
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Hi Nate,



This is Madison from Koreanclass101.com.


I bet it is confusing!


Actually what you have heard means 'I would like to listen Koreanclass101.com more!'


So when you say 'I would like to listen~' in Korean, it is '~더 듣고 싶어요.'


'To listen' in Korean is '듣다.'


As it is combined with 'I would like to~' which is '~하고 싶어요.'


듣다 + ~하고 싶어요 = ~듣고 싶어요.


So it would be,


'코리안 클래스 101 더 듣고 싶어요.'!



Hope it helped!


Thank you,

Madison, Koreanclass101.com

Nate
Friday at 6:38 am
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I was just wondering about the last example in this dialogue,it says

"커레안 크랐 101" 더 들을 싶어요 ? Is 들 mean 'listen'? Is sounded different . Is this correct?

Tim
Friday at 10:44 am
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Hello Mimi,

about your question,

많이 아파 vs 너무 아파.


Yes, you can!

많이 "many, much"

너무 "very, extremely"


both phrases mean the same - "very (much) sick"

You can also say it like this - "너무 많이 아파" or "많이 너무 아파"

I hope this helps,

cheers,

Tim :cool:

Tim
Friday at 10:40 am
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Hello Hania,

This is Tim from KC101.com.

You want to see and read 'Hangeul' in your computer!?

I think what you need is to install the below from GlobalIME.


http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=5B0BF34F-2D58-4334-A1A8-0B3B43D474A6&displaylang=EN


If you still have the problem after installing it, let me know...

cheers,

Tim :cool: