Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Minkyong: 안녕하세요. KoreanClass101의 민경입니다.
Keith: And I am Keith. Welcome to Newbie Series, Season 3, Lesson 19. Korean Numbers, No It’s Not Your Turn to Count to Twenty! Hello and welcome back to KoreanClass101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Korean. I am joined in the studio by
Minkyong: Hello everyone, Minkyong here.
Keith: All right, well in this lesson, what are we going to learn about?
Minkyong: In this lesson, you will learn about Korean numbers.
Keith: So this conversation takes place at the park where there is an iron bar where you can do pull ups, chin ups, a little exercise.
Minkyong: Yes. The conversation is between Taehun and Myeongjae two friends.
Keith: And they are friends. Therefore they will speak informal Korean.
Minkyong: 반말.
Keith: And don’t forget, you can leave us a comment on this lesson. So if you have a question
Minkyong: Or some feedback.
Keith: Please leave us a comment.
Minkyong: It’s very easy to do. Just stop by KoreanClass101.com.
Keith: Click on comments, enter your comment and name and that’s it.
Minkyong: We are looking forward to hearing from you. Okay.
Keith: All right, well let’s get warmed up. We got some exercise to do.
Minkyong: 네, 들어 봅시다.
DIALOGUE
명재: 태훈아.뭐 해?
Myeongjae: taehuna, mwo hae?
태훈: 턱걸이해. 잘 봐. 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯, 여섯, 일곱, 여덟, 아홉. 열. 아. 힘들어.
Taehun: teokgeori hae. jal bwa. hana, dul, set, net, daseot, yeoseot, ilgob, yeodeol, ahop, yeol. a! himdeureo.
명재: 뭐야! 잘 봐. 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯, 여섯, 일곱, 여덟, 아홉, 열, 열하나, 열둘, 열셋, 열넷, 열다섯, 열여섯, 열일곱, 열여덟, 열아홉, 스물. 하하하.
taehun: mwo-ya! jal bwa. hana, dul, set, net, daseot, yeoseot, ilgob, yeodeal, ahop, yeol, yeolhana, yeoldul, yeolset, yeolnet, yeoldaseot, yeolyeoseot, yeolilgob, yeolyeodeal, yeolahop, seumul. hahaha.
명재: 태훈아.뭐 해?
Myeongjae: taehuna, mwo hae?
Myeongjae: Taehun, what are you doing?
태훈: 턱걸이해. 잘 봐. 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯, 여섯, 일곱, 여덟, 아홉. 열. 아. 힘들어.
taehun:teokgeorihae. jal bwa. hana, dul, set, net, daseot, yeoseot, ilgob, yeodeol, ahop, yeol. a! Himdeureo.
Taehun: I'm doing pull-ups. Watch me! One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten. Argh, it's so tough.
명재: 뭐야! 잘 봐. 하나, 둘, 셋, 넷, 다섯, 여섯, 일곱, 여덟, 아홉, 열, 열하나, 열둘, 열셋, 열넷, 열다섯, 열여섯, 열일곱, 열여덟, 열아홉, 스물. 하하하.
taehun: mwo-ya! jal bwa. hana, dul, set, net, daseot, yeoseot, ilgob, yeodeal, ahop, yeol, yeolhana, yeoldul, yeolset, yeolnet, yeoldaseot, yeolyeoseot, yeolilgob, yeolyeodeal, yeolahop, seumul. hahaha.
Myeongjae: Come on. Watch me! One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty. Hahaha.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Minkyong: Wow Myeongjae is very fit. I can’t even do one. How about you?
Keith: Oh come on! Who do you think you are talking to, twenty pull-ups, it’s a joke.
Minkyong: Really, I don’t believe you.
Keith: You have good reason to. But I can count for you while you are trying.
Minkyong: This is not a good idea but instead let’s go over the numbers together for our listeners.
Keith: Sure it’s good idea but let’s check out today’s vocabulary words first. The first word we are going to take a look at is
VOCAB LIST
Minkyong: 뭐
Keith: What
Minkyong: 뭐 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 뭐 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next phrase we have
Minkyong: 뭐 해?
Keith: What are you doing?
Minkyong: 뭐 해 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 뭐 해 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next
Minkyong: 턱걸이
Keith: Pull up or chin up.
Minkyong: 턱걸이 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 턱걸이 [natural native speed]
Keith: And after that
Minkyong: 잘
Keith: Well.
Minkyong: 잘 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 잘 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next
Minkyong: 봐.
Keith: Look, I see.
Minkyong: 봐 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 봐 [natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
Keith: Okay. So let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase we are going to take a look at is
Minkyong: 뭐 해?
Keith: What are you doing? Okay let’s break that down really quick.
Minkyong: 뭐
Keith: What.
Minkyong: 해?
Keith: Do or do you do or are you doing.
Minkyong: 뭐 해?
Keith: What are you doing? Okay so how do we say this more politely and I think some of our listeners can guess?
Minkyong: 뭐 해요?
Keith: Right. Just add that 요 at the end. Okay, can we have a sample sentence please?
Minkyong: I use this a lot with my friends. I call them up and ask 지금 뭐 해?
Keith: What are you doing now? Minkyong, you are a loser.
Minkyong: I know.
Keith: I am just kidding. It’s a joke, you are a very popular girl.
Minkyong: No.
Keith: All right, well what’s the next word we have?
Minkyong: 잘.
Keith: Well. Can you give us the sample sentence?
Minkyong: After we eat, we say 잘 먹었습니다.
Keith: Ah that’s a good one. So literally well I ate. Can we have that one more time broken down?
Minkyong: 잘 먹었습니다 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 잘 먹었습니다 [natural native speed]
Keith: Yeah and this is a great phrase to use if you want to impress your Korean hosts, your Korean friends, your Korean family whoever. You say
Minkyong: 잘 먹었습니다.
Keith: After you eat and what is that saying actually?
Minkyong: It is like thank you for the food.
Keith: Yeah and most of the time it’s when someone is paying or someone is making the food for you.
Minkyong: Yes.
Keith: All right. Well how did 잘 come out in this dialogue?
Minkyong: Taehun said 잘 봐.
Keith: Watch me but there it’s literally watch me well or look intently, pay attention.
Minkyong: 네, 그렇죠?
Keith: Because we are using 잘.
Minkyong: 네.
Keith: What about that last word?
Minkyong: 봐.
Keith: Yeah what does that mean on its own?
Minkyong: Look, look at me.
Keith: Yeah. So what’s the formal politeness level for this?
Minkyong: 봐요.
Keith: Okay. So can you give us the sample sentence with that?
Minkyong: I say this to my friends before I go home 내일 봐.
Keith: That’s literally tomorrow see and that basically means, see you tomorrow and that’s a really nice phrase that our listeners can use as well.
Minkyong: Yeah. You can use this phrase 내일 봐 with your friends and close people around you.
Keith: All right. Well let’s move on to the focus for this lesson. We have a very important lesson. Minkyong, what is it? What are we talking about?
LESSON FOCUS
Minkyong: The numbers, native Korean numbers.
Keith: Yeah. So to explain really briefly, Korean has two number systems. One is called the Sino-Korean numbers and those are influenced by China and next is the native Korean numbers and generally speaking, we don’t want to get too much into detail right now but the Sino-Korean numbers are used for counting dates, money, people and some other things but the native Korean numbers are more generally used for counting on your own. So when you are counting 1, 2, 3, 4 and that’s exactly what happened in this dialogue. Okay so to tackle this, we will do it just like we do our regular vocabulary words. We have one time fast, one time in English, one time slow and one time normal speed. Okay so let’s start with the number 1.
Minkyong: 하나
Keith: One
Minkyong: 하나 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 하나 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next
Minkyong: 둘
Keith: Two
Minkyong: 둘 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 둘 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next
Minkyong: 셋
Keith: Three.
Minkyong: 셋 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 셋 [natural native speed] 넷
Keith: Four.
Minkyong: 넷 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 넷 [natural native speed] 다섯
Keith: Five.
Minkyong: 다섯 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 다섯 [natural native speed]
Keith: Next
Minkyong: 여섯
Keith: Six.
Minkyong: 여섯 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 여섯 [natural native speed] 일곱
Keith: 7
Minkyong: 일곱 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 일곱 [natural native speed] 여덟
Keith: 8
Minkyong: 여덟 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 여덟 [natural native speed] 아홉
Keith: 9
Minkyong: 아홉 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 아홉 [natural native speed] 열
Keith: 10
Minkyong: 열 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열 [natural native speed] 열하나
Keith: 11
Minkyong: 열하나 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열하나 [natural native speed] 열둘
Keith: 12
Minkyong: 열둘 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열둘 [natural native speed] 열셋
Keith: 13
Minkyong: 열셋 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열셋 [natural native speed] 열넷
Keith: 14
Minkyong: 열넷 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열넷 [natural native speed] 열다섯
Keith: 15
Minkyong: 열다섯 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열다섯 [natural native speed] 열여섯
Keith: 16
Minkyong: 열여섯 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열여섯 [natural native speed] 열일곱
Keith: 17
Minkyong: 열일곱 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열일곱 [natural native speed] 열여덟
Keith: 18
Minkyong: 열여덟 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열여덟 [natural native speed] 열아홉
Keith: 19
Minkyong: 열아홉 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 열아홉 [natural native speed] 스물
Keith: 20
Minkyong: 스물 [slowly - broken down by syllable] 스물 [natural native speed]
Keith: So in this conversation, how are these numbers used? What were they doing?
Minkyong: Taehun and Myeongjae were doing pull ups.
Keith: Right and as they were doing each one, they were counting.
Minkyong: 네.
Keith: So when you are counting things in sequential order, 1, 2, 3, 4, that’s when you use these numbers. What are some other situations where you can use these numbers as well?
Minkyong: You use it for the age.
Keith: Okay so how do we say our age? Let’s say I am 15 years old.
Minkyong: 열다섯 살입니다.
Keith: Right. So we use the numbers using these native Korean numbers and then what can we say after that?
Minkyong: 살입니다.
OUTRO
Keith: And these numbers are used for a lot of different things as well. So be sure to stop by KoreanClass101.com and check out our grammar bank. There, we have a detailed write up on how you can use these native Korean numbers and also how you can use the other numbers as well. The Sino-Korean numbers. Well thanks for listening. That’s going to do it for this lesson.
Minkyong: 안녕히 계세요.
Keith: See you all later.

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17 Comments

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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Did you try counting along with Minkyeong? :)

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KoreanClass101.com
Monday at 9:29 pm
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바네사씨 안녕하세요!


Thank you for posting. To answer your question, you could write 한글 숫자/한자 숫자. Some people will refer to Hangul numbers as 고유(own) 숫자, but 한글 숫자 is more widely used.


Hope this was of help!

Cheers,

Lyn

Team KoreanClass101.com

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바네사
Sunday at 6:09 am
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안녕하세요?

Great review lesson! I would like to ask how you call the two systems in Korean. I was recently copying my notes from previous seasons and I wanted to write the names in Korean. I found the expressions "한글 숫자" and "한자어 숫자" online, but to be honest I'm not totally sure those are the correct ways of naming the systems. Would they be OK?

감사합니다!

바네사 (08/17)

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KoreanClass101.com
Friday at 1:16 pm
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Hi Claudia!


"ㅅ" + vowel "ㅇ" -> sounds "ㅅ"

such as 셋은-> 세슨 / 넷이-> 네시 / 다섯을-> 다서슬


"ㅅ"+ consonants or batchim -> sounds "ㄷ"


Anne / KoreanClass101.com

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Claudia
Thursday at 9:44 am
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So when ㅅ is at the end of a syllable it's pronounced like a t right???

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Koreanclass101.com
Monday at 1:21 pm
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Hi Krista,


Thank you for your comment and it is totally true!


It sounds more like ㄷ instead of ㅅ right?


For that, I would say it is more like the rule.


You are not missing anything but the vocabularies turned out to be that way.


So no worries! and hope you keep it up well :)




Thank you


Madison

Koreanclass101.com

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Krista
Sunday at 3:02 pm
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Hi, I've been googling trying to find an explanation of why set (셋), net (넷), daseot (다섯) and yeoseot (여섯) end with a 人 when phonetically it seems they should end with a "t" consonant, such as 엗. Maybe I'm missing something here in the pronunciation or some rule about spelling so any help with understanding this would be appreciated!

감사합니다

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Tim
Friday at 10:46 am
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Hello Mimi,

SURE!!!

I am very looking forward to meeting you throughout my lessons ^^.

cheers,

Tim :cool:

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Mimi
Thursday at 4:17 pm
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Thanks again Tim!

Ok, I'll be looking forward to those lessons. :wink:

But first I've got to finish Newbie 3 and 4 :grin:

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timandyou
Thursday at 11:20 am
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Hello Mimi,

Asking questions is a good thing, a very good thing!!! for as long as you get the correct answer!


Just let you know that "Absolute Beginner Season 2" is my(Tim's) lessons.

Those lessons are very useful, easy and effective for listeners to follow through...


Okay, about your question,

힘들어 (him-deul-eo).

This 힘들어 is often used when you feel "tired" physically and mentally.

어려워 (eo-ryeo-wo).

this 어려워 is often used when you feel "challenging" on something.

You can translate 힘들어 in many different situations; however, the best translation of it would be "feel tired" or "feel exhausted".

You can translate 어려워 in many different situations; however, the best translation of it would be "feel difficult" or "feel challenging".

Both are interchangeable in some situations but, those two are different.

I hope my explanation helps,

cheers,

Tim :cool:

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Mimi
Wednesday at 4:15 pm
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Hi...again...:oops:

Sometimes, I feel a bit shy because I keep asking questions :oops:


Emm...

Ok, so for this lesson "him-deur-eo" means "it's tough". That means "it's hard" right?

So, is it interchangeable with "eo-ryeo-wo"? (which I learned in Lesson 4 as "it's difficult")


Thanks.